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Full text of "Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests of the Province of Ontario, 1919-22"

Belongs To INFORMATION & EDUCATION Rm. 24E1 

REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands, Forests 
and Mines 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



For the Year Ending 31st October 



1919 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 
Printed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 20 



Printed by 
THE RYBRSON PRESS. 



U G 4-7 . 1 ; 



n/^/^ 



CONTENTS 



Appendices : 

PAGE 

No. 1. Statement of OfRcers and Clerks in the Department 18 

2. List of Crown Lands Agents and Homestead Inspectors 21 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased and Collections 24 

4. " Gross Revenue 25 

5. " Receipts Considered as Special Funds 26 

6. " Gross Disbursements 27 

7. " Expenditure on Account of Various Services 37 

8. " Patents, etc., issued 37 

9. " Timber Cut and Amounts Accruing for Dues, etc 38 

10. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 40 

11. " Work Done in Military Branch 41 

12. Supplementary List of Licensed Cullers 41 

13. Statement of Letters Received and Dispatched 42 

14. " Locations, etc., under Free Grants Act 43 

15. •■' Lands Sold 50 

16. " Crown Surveys Completed 55 

17. " Crown Surveys in Progress 56 

18. " Municipal Surveys Ordered 57 

19. " Municipal Surveys Confirmed 57 

20. Surveyor's Report, Township Outlines, Districts of Sudbury and Timis- 

kaming 58 

21. " Township Outlines, District of Algoma 61 

22. " Township Outlines, District of Timiskaming 62 

23. '■ Traverse of Shores of Charleston and Red Horse Lakes 

and Islands Therein .- 65 

24. " Windy Lake, District of Sudbury ; . . , 67 

25. " Lower and Middle Shebandowan Lakes 68 

26. " Base and Meridian Lines, District of Thunder Bay. ... 70 

27. " Meridian Line, District of Kenora 73 

28. " Black Sturgeon River Pulp and Timber Limit 74 

29. *' Township of Williamson, District of Algoma 7S 

30. " Township Outlines between Kapuskasing and Ground- 

hog Rivers, District of Timiskaming 80 

31. " Pic River Pulpwood and Timber Limit 84 

32. ■' Township of Camming, District of Algoma 86 

33. " Traverse Opazatika River and Lakes, Pishkanogama 

Lake, Groundhog and Horwood Lakes, and Sahka- 

tawichtah River and Lake 87 

34. " Township Outlines, District of Sudbury 92 

35. " Traverse Lakes, Rivers and Portages, Timagami For- 

est Reserve. Districts of Sudbury and Nipissing . . 95 

36. Report of Settlers' Loan Commissioner 96 

37. Algonquin Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 98 

38. Quetico Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 102 

39. Colonization and Immigration, Director's Report 103 

40. Forestry, Provincial Forester's Report 105 

41. Fuel Supply, Wood-cutting Permits to Municipalities 126 

42. Colonization Roads, Director's Report 126 

43. Northern Ontario Development, Commissioners' Reports 163 



Report of the Minister of Lands, Forests 
and Mines of the Province of Ontario 

For the Year Ending 31st October, 1919 



To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Hoxour: 

I have the honour to submit for the information of your Honour and the 
Legislative Assembly a report for the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1919, of 
the management of the Crown Lands of the Province. 

Clergy Lands. 

The collection on account of Clergy Lands was $487.70. Xo land was dis- 
posed of during the year. (See Appendix No. 3, page 21.) 

Common School Lands. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 72.33 acres for $109.87. 
The 'Collection on account of these and former ^ales was $7,984.02. (See Appendix 
No. 3, page 24.) 

Grammar School Lands. 

The collection on account of former sales was $627.54. (See Appendix No. 
3, page 24.) 

University Lands. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 119.50 acres for $59.75. 
The collection on account of these and former sales was $2,064.40. (See Appendix 
No. 3, page 24.) 

Crown Lands. 

There was sold during the year for agricultural and town site areas 49,704.32 
acres for $48,119.74. The collection on account of these and former sales was 
$79,841.77. There was sold for mining purposes 10,600.28 acres for $28,350.01. 
There was collected on account of these and former sales $28,510.54. 

There was leased for mining purposes 2,137.21 acres for $1,562.99. Tliere 
was collected on account of these leases and those of former years $14,270.78. 
There was leased of Crown Lands an area of 8,820.41 acres for $2,164.25. There 
was collected on account of these and the leases of former years $66,024.15. 

[51 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



The total area of Crown lands disposed of by sale and lease during the year 
was 71,454.05 acres for a value of $80,366.61, as compared with 103,701.59 acres 
sold and leased in 1917 for $80,345.43. The total collection on account of the 
sales, leases, etc., was $199,810.90. (See Appendix No. 3, page 24.) 



Sales. 

Throughout the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1919, more inquiries were 
received and answered than during any corresponding period since the outbreak of 














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#'* 



1^ 



h m\ 



Field peas, Boulter Ranch, Nipissing District. 



the Great War. While all these did not result in actual sales it is gratifying to 
observe that more purchasers acquired land during the past than the previous 
year although the acreage involved is approximately the same. Appendix No. 15 
is a compilation of all land sales and grants other than those occurring in Free 
Grant Territory and from this may be ascertained in detail the transactions accord- 
ing to townships, agencies and districts. It was necessary to cancel 208 sales for 
failure of the purchasers to meet the prescribed conditions of settlement while 
19 sales were restored for Just cause and 312 settlers, for various reasons, were 
permitted to assign their interests to bona fide tillers of the soil. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 7 

Settlers to the number of 539 proved up and acquired their patents for an 
area of 55,000 acres against approximately 400 and an acreage of 36,000 for the 
year 1918. An evidence of the desire of the settlers to maintain their payments 
in respect of land purchases is found in the fact that the collections on account of 
new and old sales exceeded last year's by nearly $30,000, although in a number 
of cases where returned soldiers presented their credentials the arrears due the 
Crown were remitted. Several old Clergy and Common School land sales were 
paid in full and the proper claimants secured titles. 

The unsolved problems arising out of the war with the general state of unrest 
and the somewhat restricted field from which to draw desirable settlers tend to with- 
hold for the time being a rush to the northern sections of the Province. The 
economic strain of modern life conduces to a desire to a hurried investment and 
a quick and extensive return from the land rather than to an ambition to hew 
out a home by steady and persistent pioneer methods. 




Flock going to pasture; Boulter Ranch, Nipissing District. 

With a gradual return, however, to more stable conditions and to a more 
general realization of the necessity of putting in labour on the undeveloped lands 
of the Crown to secure adequate crop results and, within a measurable degree of 
success, a reasonable equilibrium between production and consumption, there shall 
be an impetus to the " back to the land " movement. Any predictions apart from 
this as respects land purchases and active settlement in Northern Ontario would 
be unjustifiable in the face of problematical immigration conditions and the 
financial aid and general appeal held out to returned men to resume the many 
abandoned cleared farms in the older sections of the Province. 



Free Grants. 

There were 576 settlers who took up free homesteads within the year, or over 
150 more than the previous year. The area thus located comprised 72,420 acres. 
Patents for such homesteads issued to 431 while assignments numbering 253 



EEPORT OP THE No. 3 



covering an area of 34,123 acres were duly approved. The privilege of buying 
an additional area adjacent to a homestead for pasturing fuel or cropping purposes 
was exercised by 140 locatees. 

Although in Appendix No. 14 practically all the Free Grant townships appear 
for the purposes of maintaining a detailed reference according to agencies and 
districts a perusal of same will show that in some no locations were effected and 
in others but few. This is due to the fact that many of the areas involved have 
been in the market for a long period and all the desirable land therein has been 
acquired. 

Checking up delinquents with a view to ascertaining the extent of their 
settlement requirements resulted in the cancellation of 425 persons whose locations 
in a number of instances had been allowed years ago. 

The remarks under the previous heading " Sales " in respect of the future 
of settlement apply with equal force to Free Homesteading. 

A list of the islands sold in Free Grant territory appears in Appendix 14. 

Patents, Leases, Licenses. 

Instruments to the number of 1,394 were issued through the Patents Office, 
an increase of 43 over the year ending 31st October, 1918. 

Of the total 850 covered settlers' patents, 68 veteran grants and 377 mining 
grants and leases. The remaining 190 consisted of Crown Leases, Licenses of 
Occupation, Pine Patents and Orders-in-Council. 

In addition to the entry of all such documents the Patents Office is required 
to prepare references, make daily searches respecting old grants, record new ones 
and to regularly mark and maintain the office maps showing all transactions as 
indicated in the instruments issued in accordance with Appendix 8. 

Military Grants. 

Under the Veteran Land Act, 1 Edward VII, Cap. 6, and amendments thereto, 
there have been issued 13,998 certificates, and although the time for receiving 
applications for these grants expired on the 30th September, 1908, there are still 
letters being received from men who were entitled to this grant, but claim that 
they have only now become aware of the fact. These applications, therefore, could 
not now be accepted and no forms of applications have been sent out. 

During the past year there have been located 45 of these certificates covering 
7,189 acres in the townships open for veterans, making in all a total of 8,329 
certificates thus located. 

In six cases the certificates have been surrendered and applied in payment 
of lands purchased from the Crown, covering in all 960 acres, making a total of 
791 that have thus been applied. 

There were three certificates surrendered to the Crown for the $50.00 com- 
mutation money, making a total of 3,263 certificates surrendered in this manner. 

During the year there have been issued. 34 patents for lands located by 
veterans, and in all 7,371 have thus been disposed of. 

The total number of certificates that have, therefore, been disposed of is 
12,383, leaving 1,615 that are still outstanding. 

During the year 16 veteran locations, covering 2,549 acres, were cancelled 
for the non-performance of the settlement duties to which they became subject 
on account of being assigned before patent was issued. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 9 

Under the Act 1 Edward VII, Cap. 6, and amendments thereto covering 
these grants it is necessar}^ for all locatees of the lands granted under this Act 
to apply for their patents for such lands before ten years have expired from 
the date of location. If this application for patent is not made within ten years 
then the land comes under the settlement regulations, and unless the settlement 
duties are proceeded with, the locations are liable to cancellation. Previous to 
the expiration of the ten years after location, the Department has sent a notice to 
each veteran, who should apply for his patent stating this fact, and in this manner 
has saved many of the locations from becoming subject to the settlement duties. 
See Appendix No. 11. 

Financial Assistance to Settlers. 

The Settlers' Loan Commissioner reports having received up to October 31st, 
1919, a total of 3,001 applications for loans, amounting in all to $776,790.00. 
In all, 1,414 loans have been made to settlers amounting to $442,256.00. In 
addition, an advance of $12,000 was made to the Sudbury Co-Operative Creamery 
Company, to which reference was made in the annual report for the previous year. 

Requests for loans are given most careful consideration, but advances are 
not made except in cases where the security offered is sufficient to afford the Depart- 
ment every reasonable protection. 

It is worthy of note that nearly 90 per cent, of accrued interest payments 
have been taken care of by borrowers, and further that payments on principal 
have exceeded the amounts due on account — ^numerous loans having been paid off 
in advance of date of maturity. 

The settlers of Northern Ontario, generally speaking, appear to appreciate 
fully the advantages afforded by the Settlers' Loan Commissioner, and the amounts 
which have been advanced, undoubtedly, have greatly assisted settlement in the 
north, and have also considerably increased production along agricultural lines. 

Memorandum Re Mineral Industry in Ontario for 1919. 

The chief metallic products of Ontario are nickel, copper, gold and silver. 
The effect of the great war was to stimulate the production of three of these 
metals, namely, nickel, copper and silver, while on gold it had the opposite effect. 

Nickel and copper are essentials for modern warfare, and while the war con- 
tinued their production rose to the maximum capacity of the mines. Of nickel the 
total output in 1918 was 46,072 tons, having a value of $27,840,422. The signing 
of the armistice on the 11th November, 1918, found the allied governments and 
munition contractors stocked with nickel and the demand at once ceased. Curtail- 
ment of operations at the mines and smelters immediately followed, and for the 
larger part of 1919, only a minimum amount of work was done, awaiting the 
absorption of the surplus nickel by peace and reconstruction industries. Towards 
the end of the year demand revived, and the prospect is for an early resumption on 
a pre-war scale. The total output in 1919 was about one-half that of the previous 
year, and the value fell to about $12,000,000. There was a similar reduction in 
the output of copper, say from 23,000 tons to about half the quantity, the value 
being about $3,500,000. 

The extraordinary demand for silver, and the falling off of the output in all 
silver-producing countries, had a marked effect on the Cobalt silver mines. This 

2 F.M. 



10 • EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

demand continued and was intensified during 1919. With silver at $1.25 and 
$1.30 per ounce, waste dumps became valuable, and abandoned properties were 
reworked. Long continued and steady production by the established mines has now 
told heavily on the reserves of ores at Cobalt. Labour strikes brought about a 
stoppage of the mines for nearly two months. When the statistics of production are 
compiled, they will doubtless show a heavy falling off in the quantity of silver 
produced as compared with 1918. " The increased price of the metal will assist 
the figures of aggregate value, but these too will show a decline. 

In the case of gold, the steadily mounting cost of supplies and labour narrowed 
the margin for profits while the war lasted. There has been no relaxation in these 
respects even since, but with the return of the skilled miners the efficiency of labour 
has markedly risen. The gold output for 1919 will be about $10,000,000, or an 
increase of $1,800,000 over 1918. In fact, the outlook of gold mining in Northern 
Ontario is decidedly good. The Hollinger mine at Porcupine, is one of the largest 
gold mines of the world, and is now producing at the rate of about $8,000,000 
per annum. Ore reserves at the Hollinger and Mclntyre mines are being enlarged, 
and the camp is on a solid basis. The position of Kirkland Lake, too, has been 
improved. The east-and-west vein system running through the bed of Kirkland 
Lake and lying to the south of it, contains high gold values, and a group of 
important mines is being established upon it. The Lake Shore, Wright-Hargreaves, 
Kirkland Lake, Teck-Hughes, and others are in this neighbourhood. Tough-Oakes 
and Associated Gold Mines lie further to the east. The newer gold camps, 
including Boston Creek, Bourkes, Fort Matachewan and other*, are passing througn 
the development stage. At Larder Lake there is also considerable activity. Gold 
finds have been made near Schreiber on the main line of the C.P.E. and south 
of Dryden station. It can be truthfully said that in the pre-Cambrian formations 
of Northern Ontario the gold prospector will find as promising a scene for Tiis 
labours as anywhere else in the world. 

Other minerals are being sought for in territory north of the Transcontinental 
railway. Lignite, iron ore, gypsum and refractory clay are known to exist, and 
these deposits are now being investigated. The limestone formations underlying 
the coastal slope by no means preclude the existence of oil, gas or salt. Distances 
are great and the expense of moving machinery is heavy, and it is proposed by 
some to call in the use of the seaplane to assist in exploration. 

The mineral industry in older Ontario is largely a non-metallic one, except 
m Hastings county and the lead deposits on the Ottawa river. The output of 
building materials has been kept down by the high level to which prices have 
risen, and until there is a reduction in values, or what is more likely to happen, 
until the new level becomes a normal one, capital will not flow freely into the 
building trade. Petroleum shows an increase in production over 1918 ; natural gas 
a decline, due both to the failing supply and to the governmental efforts at restric- 
tion to domestic uses. The remaining materials on the long list of non-metallic 
products, continue to be produced in about the usual quantities, but in most cases 
in larger values. 

Collections'. 

The total revenue of the Department from all sources was $2,755,736.28. Of 
this, $79,841.77 came from Agricultural lands and Town sites; Mining lands, 
$28,510.54; Mining and Crown Leases, $80,294.93; Miners' licenses, permits and 
recording fees, $63,962.90 ; Supplementary Revenue tax, $626,321.20. From Woods 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 11 

and Forests the revenue was $1,803,081.36, made up of the following items, Bonus, 
$872,598.69; Timber dues, $663,928.30; Ground rent, $87,682.52; Transfer fees, 
$5,205.00; Fire protection charge, $174,666.85. (See Appendix No. 4, page 25.) 

DISBURSEME^'TS. 

The total expenditure of the Department for ordinary service waS $1,536,766,- 
93. Some of the principal items were : Crown Land agents' salaries and disburse- 
ments, $18,915.79; Jiomestead inspectors, $16,934.76; Crown timber agents, 
$31,580.81; Ottawa agency, $3,240.55; fire ranging, $528,734.64; 'forest ranging 
and estimation of timber, $140,338.50; forest reserves, $6,140.25; salaries, wages 
and expenses of men, re reforestation, $6,923.56; investigation in reforestation, 
$5,465.17; investigation of forest tree diseases, $5,651.77; surve3^s, $128,823.25; 
colonization roads, $390,621.54; printing and advertising, $21,351.13; emigration 
work in Great Britain, $34,052.07; grant to Brigadier-General R. F. M. Sims, 
$5,000.00; purchase and distribution of films, $4,543.95; mines and mining, 
$77,308.29; mining recorders, $24,681.62; Provincial assay, $6,075.21; natural 
gas advisory board, $6,460.13; contingencies, lands and/forests, $31,302.37; Bureau 
of Mines, $12,731.91; forestry, $1,425.29; colonization, $2,100.25; colonization 
roads, $4,130.64. 

A further sum of $177,973.35 was expended under the direction of the Depart- 
ment, distributed as fallows: Algonquin Provincial Park, $31,223.76; Quetico 
Provincial Park, $11,291.69; Veterans' Commutation, $150.00; Royal Nickel Com- 
mission, $46.85; legal investigations, $2,171:50; fuel investigation, $118,089.55; 
fuel problem, $15,000.00. (See Appendices Nos. 6 and 7.) 

Woods akd Forests, 

The accrued revenue from Woods and Forests for the year ending October 
31st, 1919, amounted to $2,278,558.66, which exceeded that of the previous year 
by $642,874.33. 

The revenue collected during the same period totalled $1,803,081.36, or 
$46,996.11 in excess of the amount collected during the year ending October 31st, 
1918. 

The production of pine timber during the season of 1918-19 amounted to 
over one hundred, and ninety-two million feet board measure, as against approxi- 
mately two hundred and eighteen million feet for the previous season, representing 
a decrease of, in round numbers, twenty-six million feet. The production of other 
timber amounted to somewhat over thirty-eight million feet, as against twenty- 
nine million feet for the previous season. 

Pulpwood cut from Crown lands for the season 1918-19 amounted to 320,195 
cords as against 338,563 cords for the previous season. 

A very large increase will be noted in the number of railway ties removed 
from Crown lands. The cut for the current season amounted to 5,140,654 ties as 
against 2,094,099 ties cut during the season of 1917-18. The price of railway 
ties continues to advance. 

No pulpwood concessions were disposed of during the current year. 

It might also be noted that pulpwood amounting to 414,977 cords was removed 
from settlers' lands, also 1,064,675 railway ties. 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Lands Under License. 

The area under license at the close of the fiscal year was 16,231 square miles, 
a decrease of 657 square miles from the previous year. 

Sum:hary of Revenue from Woods and Forests. 

Bonus $872,598 69 

Timber Dues 662,928 30 

Ground Rent 87,682 52 

Transfer Fees 5,205 00 

Fire Protection 174,666 85 

$1,803,081 36 

Cullers' Examination. ' 

Two examinations were held during the year, one at North Bay and one at 
Kenora. Four candidates succeeded in passing the examination and were duly 
granted certificates authorizing them to act as Cullers. For names of Cullers who 
passed at these examinations, see page 41, Appendix 12. For complete list of 
licensed Cullers see Minister's Reports for 1917 and for 1918. 

Fire Protection. 

The season of 1919 was the third season during which the Forestry Branch 
was charged with the work relating to the Forest Fire Prevention Act of 1917. 
In submitting his report for 1919, the Provincial Forester suggests that considera- 
tion be given to legislation which will provide for compulsory fire fighting by 
local labour in cases of necessity. Attention is also drawn to the advisability of 
amending the Forest*Fires Prevention Act to provide more effective penalties for 
violation of the permit regulations. Such violations of the permit regulations 
are punishable at the present time by fine only. 

During the season of 1919, six thousand six Imndred and thirty-five fire 
permits were issued covering a total of 26,790 acres, as against nine thousand 
five hundred and ninety permits for the season of 1918, covering 39,633 acres. 
Twenty-three persons were prosecuted for infractions of the permit regulations 
and convictions were secured in twenty cases. As has been intimated above, the 
time seems opportune for consideration of the insertion in the Act of provisions 
for more drastic penalties in cases of flagrant offences. 

The territory protected was divided into thirty ranger districts. The field 
force consisted of one Superintendent, four Inspectors, tliirty Chief Rangers, 
forty-nine Deputy Chief Rangers, with a maximum of one thousand and fourteen 
rangers. 

Forest Fires. 

During the early part of the fire season the weather was comparatively wet, 
and it was accordingly possible to keep the ranging staff at a minimum. In the 
month of ^lay the weather became very dry, and a period of three months of 
abnormally dry weather conditions followed. Fires became numerous and assumed 
large proportions. 

Difficulty was first encountered in the Clay Belt District. The permit system 
undoubtedly saved the situation from becoming more serious than was actually 
the case. Clearing fires, however, in numerous cases got out of control, and 



1919-20 DEPAKTMEXT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 13 

resulted in the destruction of considerable property but fortunately there was no 
loss of life. 

The most serious loss and damage occurred in the central inspectorate, em- 
bracing, roughly, the middle portion of the white pine belt in Ontario. It does 
not appear that the loss of standing timber was the most serious factor, but 
rather the destruction of young growth. In the strip of country lying between 
Lake Nipissing and Sault Ste. Marie, lying south of the Mississauga Forest Reserve 
it appears that approximately 522,000 acres were burned over. The western and 
southern inspectorates also suffered from severe fires. 

The protracted period of dry weather, in some districts, the scarcity of water 
and the extreme difficulty in securing competent labour, all added to the diffi- 
culties of the fire ranging staff and added to the losses occasioned. 

Measures will have to be taken having in view the more thorough protection 
of cut-over lands, and it would seem the time is opportune to consider the more 
general adoption of slash disposal regulations. 

The total area reported as being burned over exceeded 922,000 acres. 

It is found ^nce again that the various railways were the most fruitful causes 
of fires. Eeports indicate that 48 per cent, of all fires reported originated from 
this source. 8.2 per cent, of all fires reported were attributed to settlers, 11.2 per 
cent, to campers, the remainder from various causes — in numerous cases unknown. 

Improvement Work. 

Improvement work was necessarily curtailed during the season of 1919, owing 
to the serious fire situation and to the shortage of labour. 

Equipment. 

Steps were taken to have all equipment such as canoes, railway velocipedes, 
etc., painted the same colour, and after a uniform pattern. All equipment was 
stencilled, or branded, and the main articles of equipment were numbered on a 
definite system, to assist in the keeping of proper records, and to determine the 
life of various goods supplied by different manufacturers. Considerable new 
equipment in the shape of canoes, power boats, tents, etc., was added. 

Large provision is required for the proper storage of all equipment, and 
accordingly, a number of store-houses have been erected notwithstanding which 
it has been found necessary to rent considerable warehouse space. 

The educational campaign in the way of instructing the public as to the 
prevention of forest fires was continued. Numerous fire signs were posted, and 
in addition, quantities of pencils, calendars and rulers were sent out in quarters 
where it was calculated that the best results would be obtained. 

Locomotive Inspections. 

One thousand and twelve locomotive inspections were made at an average 
cost of $2.07 per inspection. Two hundred and twenty-one inspections showed 
defects. 

Forestry. 

Particular attention is directed to the section of the Provincial Forester's 
report dealing with problems of reforestation. Valuable work is being done at 
tlie Provincial Forest Station in Norfolk County. About 40,000 trees were sent 



14 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

out during the season to private planters. The work at the station has proceeded 
under difficulties for the past few years owing to difficulty in securing reliable 
seed. It is anticipated, that there should, be no great difficulty in placing this 
work on a more satisfactory basis in the near future. 

Tkee Diseases. 

Dr. J. H. Faull continued, his iiivestigations, and. has submitted a very valu- 
able report which will be found embodied in the report of the Provincial Forester. 
A complete summary of the work of the Forestry Branch will be found in Appendix 
40, page 105. 

CROWN SURVEYS. 

Instructions were given to perform tlie following surveys of Crown lands 
during the year and the work was carried out as shown in the latter portion of 
this report. 

These surveys comprise : — 

(1) Three hundred and thirty miles of meridian and base lines including 

parts of the boundary lines between Rainy River, Kenora and Thunder 
Bay Districts. 

(2) Eight hundred and forty miles of township outlines in the Districts of 

Thunder Bay, Algoma, Timiskaming and Sudbury. 

(3) Subdivision into lots and concessions of the Township of Fowler and 

parts of the Townships of Devon, Hanlan, Casgrain and Nansen. 

(4) Traverse survey of lakes west of Lake Timagami in the Timagami 

Forest Reserve, Districts of Nijsissing and Sudbury. 
Dog Lake, Long Lake and L^pper Shebandowan Lake, in the District of 

Thunder Bay. 
Opazatika and Dog Lake, in the District of Algoma. 
Missinaibi Lake, Pishkanogama Lake, Horwood Lake and Sahkatawichtah 

Lake, in the District of Sudbury. 
Charleston Lake in the County of Leeds. 

(5) Retracing of part of the boundary of the Algonquin Provincial Park, 

District of Nipissing. 

(6) Survey of timber limit lines in the Township of Wigle, District of 

Sudbury, and in territory east of the Township of Askin, in the Dis- 
trict of Nipissing. 

(7) Close traverse of shores and islands in Windy Lake, Townships of Dow- 

ling and Cascaden, District of Sudbury, including soundings and the 
fixing of special lines of reference for mining purposes. 

Twenty-five survey parties were engaged on this work and most of the sur- 
veyors report a very difficult and trying season's work due to labour and weather 
conditions. 

The reports received from the Inspector of Surveys show that the work in 
general has been well performed. 

MUNICIPAL SURVEY'S. 

Petitions for Municipal surveys were received from the municipalities of the 
Townships of Williamsburgh, McNab and ^ Southwold, for the survey of certain 
original road allowances within the said townships, and these petitions were acted 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 15 

upon as provided for under R.S.O. 1914^ Cap. 166, sections 13 and 14. In addi- 
tion to the above the survey performed in the Township of Gouibourn on petition 
of the municipality was confirmed. 

Detailed description of the several surveys performed under instructions from 
this Department will be found in Appendices 20 to 35, inclusive. 

Colonization Roads. 

On March 1st, 1919, the Colonization Roads Branch of the Public Works 
Department was transferred to the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines. A 
report as to the work of the Colonization Roads Branch will be found in Appendix 
43, page 126. 

Northern Development Branch. 

The work of the Northern Development Branch was continued as in the past 
under the direction of Mr. J. F. Whitson and Mr. C. H. Fullerton. The work 
on the Saul t- Sudbury Trunk Road, together with the work on the roads on St. 
Joseph's Island was placed under the direction of Mr. John L. Lang,, of Sault Ste. 
Marie. It is expected that the Sault-Sudbury road will be completed during 1920. 
Every endeavour is being made to keep existing portions of this road in a proper 
state of repair. The report of the Northern Development Branch is found in 
Appendix 43, page 163. 



G. H. Ferguson, 

Minister. 



Department of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, October .31st, 1919. 



APPENDICES 



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24 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. S. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased. Amount of Sales and Leases and Amount of Collections 

for the year ending October 31st, 1919. 



Service. 



Lands Sold: 

Agricultural and Townsites. 

Mining 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands , 

Grammar School Lands . . . . . 

University Lands 

Land^ Leased: 

Mining 

Crown 

Temagami 



Acres sold 

and 

leased. 



49,704.32 
10,600.28 



72.33 



119.50 

2,137.21 

8,815.06 

5.35 



71,454.05 



Amount of 

sales and 

leases. 



48,119 74 
28,350 01 



109 87 



59 75 

1,562 99 

2,094 25 

70 00 



80,366 61 



Collection 

on sales 

and leases. 



79,841 77 

28,510 54 

487 70 

7,984 02 

627 54 

2,064 40 

14,270 78 

64,950 00 

1,074 15 



199,810 90 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



35 



Appendix No. 4. 

Statement of Revenue of the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines for the year ending 

October 31st, 1919. 



Service. 



$ c. 




$ c. 



Land Coixections. 

Crown Lands: ^, ^^^ ,^ 

Agricultural ^Hg '^« 

Townsites i3,U4<2 ^8 



Mining Sales isV vA' 

Clergy Lands 487 70 

Common School Lands ' > ^^^ "^ 

Grammar School Lands xf ^ ^4 

University Lands ^'"64 40 



Rent: 

Mining Leases . . . 
Temagami Leases 



14,270 78 
1,074 15 



Crown Leases oc" o?o ?I 

Sand and Gravel Royalty ^^- j}^ ]^ 

" Rentals .?. fAl^Al 

Water Powers ( ^'q?q ^r 

A Igonquin Provincial Park ^"^ '^^ 



Miners' Licenses 

Permits 

Recording Fees . 



Supplementary Revenue: 

Acreage Tax 

Profit Tax 

Gas Tax 

Gas License 



Bonus 

Timber Dues . . 
Ground Rent . . 
Transfer Fees 
Fire Protection 



Woods and Forests, 



27,178 55 

1,697 25 

35,087 10 



33,126.34 

553,027 15 

38,797 71 

1,370 00 



Provincial Assay Fees 

Casual Fees 

Cullers' Fees 

Forest Reserves Guides' Fees 



Algonquin Provincial Park , 



RlETDNOS. 

Forest Ranging 

Fire Ranging 

War Relief 

Emigration Work, Great Britain 

Fuel Investigation 

Explorations and Investigations. 

Agents' Salaries 

Quetico Provincial Park 

Contingencies 

Forest Reserves 



729 60 

1,172 53 

588 50 

50 00 



79,841 77 
28,510 54 



11,163 66 



15,344 93 



64,950 00 



63,962 90 



626,321 20 



872,598 69 

662,928 30 

87,682 52 

5,205 00 

174,666 85 



2.490 63 
29,484 44 



24,324 32 

4,202 65 

840 00 

462 07 

348 41 

153 50 

85 00 

82 00 

46 90 

40 00 



119,515 97 



80.294 93 



690,284 10 



1.803,081 36 



31,975 07 



30,584 85 

2,755,736 28 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



26 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 5. 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines for the year ending 
October 81st, 1919, which are considered as Special Funds. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 




Clergy Lands. 






Principal 




254 80 
232 90 




Interest r 








487 70 




Common School Lands. 




Principal .... . . 




4,515 87 
3,468 15 




Interest 








7,984 02 




Grammar School Lands. 




Principal 




360 28 
267 26 




Interest r 








fi5>7 54 




University Lands. 






Principal 




1,424 20 
640 20 




Interest r - - - - - - 








2.064 40 






. 


11,163 66 



D. GEO. ROSS. 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINEg. 



27 



Appendix No. 6. 

Statemeat of Disbursements of the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines, for the 

year ending October 31st, J9I9. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Agents' Salabies and Disbursements. 
Land, ■$18,91,5.79. 
Anderson, T. V 


633 32 
66 00 


699 32 
200 00 

350 00 

1,123 05 
200 00 

543 98 
1,365 20 

543 00 

515 OO 
1,073 50 

504 00 

586 40 
500 00 

518 00 

975 52 

998 56 

254 90 
300 00 

297 26 

642 77 

700 00 




Disbursements 








Arthurs, E 






Baker, R. H 












Bolger, J. W 


916 66 
206 39 




Disbursements 




Both C . 






Brown, John 


500 00 
43 98 




Disbursements 








Burrows W A 


1,000 00 
365 20 




Disbursements 








Cameron, W 


500 00 
43 00 




Disbursements 








Campbell, Miss I. M 


500 00 
15 00 

1,000 00 
73 50 

500 00 
4 00 

500 00 
36 40 








Dempsay, S. J 




Disbursements 




Dodds, T 








Douglas. W. J 

Disbursements 








Ellis. H. J 






Ereeborn, J S 


500 00 
18 00 












Gibson, J. E 


816 67 
158 85 




Disbursements 








Ginn, F E 


916 66 
81 90 

250 00 
4 90 








Hales, W 




Disbursements 




Hollands, C J 




Jenkin, W 


291 00 
6 26 




Disbursements 










600 00 
42 77 




Disbursements 








MacLennan J K 












Carried forward 


12,840 46 





28 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Continued. 

Land — Concluded. 
Noble, E 



Parsons, W. J. . . 
Disbursements 



Philion, J. A 

Disbursements 



Prince, A 

Disbursements 

Small, R 

Disbursements 

Spry, W. L 

Disbursements 



Thaw, D 

Disbursements 



Teasdale, R. A. 
Watt, F 



Whybourne, W. E. 
Disbursements 



Wilson, A. N 

Disbursements 



Woollings, J 

Disbursements 



Homestead Inspectors, $16,93i.~6. 

Barr. J 

Disbursements 



Bastien. J. A. ... 
Disbursements 



Brown. J. B 

Disbursements 



Burnes. C. W 

Disbursements 

CragR. W. V 

Disbursements 



Dean. T 

Disbursements 



Hughes. T 

Disbursements 



Owens, H. B 

Disbursements 



716 32 
176 50 

500 00 
23 67 



500 00 
30 00 

500 00 
29 00 

600 00 
488 80 



166 00 
2 87 



Carried forward 



300 00 
4 10 


175 00 

7 75 


716 32 

39 00 


1,200 00 
792 90 


916 66 
235 25 

1,000 00 
311 35 

1,000 00 
349 68 

1.200 00 
333 63 


800 00 
186 65 


" 1,000 00 
433 30 


838 48 
914 75 



12,840 46 

300 00 

892 82 
523 67 
530 00 
529 00 
1,088 80 



168 87 
500 00 

300 00 



304 10 
182 75 
755 32 

1 ,992 90 
1,151 91 
1 ,311 35 
1,349 68 
1.533 63 
986 65 
1 ,433 30 
1,753 23 



30,428 44 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



39 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



Brought forward 

Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Continued. 
Homestead Inspectors — Concluded. 



Smith, D 

Disbursements 



Watson, T. P 

Disbursements 



Wigle, R. G 

Disbursements 



Timber, $31,580.81. 



Bremner. G 

Disbursements 



Christie, W. P. . . 
Disbursements 



Hawkins, S. J. . . 
Disbursements 



Henderson, C 

Webster, W. A., Assistant 
Disbursements 



Huckson, A. H. . . 
Disbursements 



Jones, W. M 

McDonald, A., Assistant 

Watts, G 

Disbursements 



MacDonald, S. C. 
Disbursements 



Margach, W 

Legris, J., Assistant 

Cunningham, Mrs. E. A., Stenographer 

Gamble, Miss V., Stenographer 

Disbursements 



McDonald, H 

Disbursements 

McDougall, J. T 

Disbursements 

Oliver, J. A 

Campbell, Miss M., Stenographer 

Godfrey, Miss S., Stenographer . 

Disbursements 



Stevenson, A. ... 
Disbursements 



Carried foricard 



1,500 00 
418 11 



1 ,200 00 
614 75 



1,200 00 
489 25 



1,800 00 
440 38 



1,616 00 
347 80 



1,616 00 
351 15 



2,018 67 
210 00 
419 21 

1,800 00 
750 78 

1,442 30 

1,500 00 

57 70 

242 55 



1 ,700 00 
198 33 



1,600 00 
1.600 00 

442 75 
24 75 

524 37 



1 .500 00 
215 55 

1,716 67 
416 26 

1,724 83 
119 23 
530 93 
565 80 



1,500 00 
373 40 



30,428 44 



,918 11 
,814 75 
,689 25 

,240 38 
,963 80 
,967 15 

,647 88 
,550 78 

,242 55 
,898 33 

,191 87 
,715 55 
, 132 93 



2,940 79 



1, 
65, 



873 40 
215 96 



30 



EEPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



Brought forward 

Agents' Salaries axd DisBVRSEMK^rs^Concluded. 

Timber — Concluded. 
Whelan, P. J., disbursements 



Wood, W. G. A. .. 
Disbursements 



Miscellaneous, $1,562.20. 

Green, H. P., Caretaker, Islands in Charlston Lake 
Jamieson, W. H., Caretaker, Islands in Dog and 

Laboria Lakes 

McArthur, T. A., Inspector of Agencies 

Disbursements 



Ottawa Agency. 



Darby, E. J 
Larose, S. C 

Rent 

Disbursements 



Agent 
Clerk 



Cullers' Act. 



Greer, Wm 

Disbursements 



Jones, W. M Disbursements 

Oliver, J. A Disbursements 



FiRR Ranging . . . 
Forest Ranging 
Forest Reserves 



Salaries, wages and expenses of men, be re- 
forestation 



Purchase, care and feed of horses, and purchase 
of seed, nursery stock, fertilizer and 

NURSERY equipment 



Purchasing options and rentals of land 
Investigation in reforestation 



Allowance to School Section in Township of 
South Walsingham 



Care and maintenance of buildings . . 
Investigation of forest tree diseases 

Surveys 

Carried foricard 



1,400 00 
372 81 



750 00 
712 20 



700 00 
40 55 



12 00 
3 60 



65,215 96 

442 59 

1,772 81 

50 00 
50 00 

1,462 20 



1,500 00 
1,000 00 



740 55 



15 60 
35 70 

9 66 



68,993 56 



3,240 55 



60 96 

528,734 64 

140,338 50 

6,140 25 

6,923 56 



2, 316 63 


90 00 


5,465 17 


150 00 


59 46 


5,651 77 


128,823 25 


896,988 30 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 


31 


Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 


Service. $ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 



Brought forward 
Board of Surveyors . 



CoLONiZATiox Roads 

Annuai, Membership Pees 

Workmen's Compensation 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous 

Unforeseen and Unprovided 

Grant to Canadian Forestry Association 
Refunds (Miscellaneous) 



Colonization and Immigration. 

Printing, Advertising, etc 

Land Guides 

Emigration Work in Great Britain 

War Relief 

Women's Welcome Hostel 

Women's Hostel and Travellers' Aid. Ottawa. 
Grant to Brigadier-General R. F. M. SiMs . . . . 
Rental Immigration Office 



Purchase and distribution of films and moving 
picture machines 



Allowance to J. M. Clark 



Mines and Mining. 

Miller, W. G., Provincial Geologist, services 
Disbursements 



Knight, C. W., 1st Assistant Geologist, services . . 
Disbursements 

Burrows, A. G., 2nd Assistant Geologist, services. 
Disbursements 



Hopkins, P. E., 3rd Assistant Geologist, services. 
Disbursements 



Rogers, W. R., Topographer, services 
Disbursements 



Bell, W. J., Cartographer, services 



5,000 00 
130 36 



3,000 00 
1,611 21 

2,850 00 
546 33 

2,400 00 
524 68 



2,500 00 
952 45 



Mickle, G. R., Mine Assessor, services 
Disbursements 



4, 400 00 
245 40 



Carried forward 



5,130 36 
4,611 21 
3,396 33 
2,924 63 



3,452 45 
1,350 00 



4,645 40 
25,510 38 1 



896,988 30 


200 QO 


390,621 54 


49 93 


150 00 


711 73 


117 86 


370 92 


1,000 00 


3,201 33 



21,351 13 

254 00 

34,052 07 

2,544 07 

1,400 00 

500 00 

5,000 00 

572 15 

4,543 95 
350 00 



1,363,978 98 



32 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Mixes and Mixing — Continued. 

Godson, T. E., Mining Commissioner, services . . . 

Morris, W. H., Mining Commissioner's Clerk, 

services 



Wliite, Miss N., Stenographer 
Booth. Miss E., do 

Disbursements , 



Sutherland, T. P., Chief Inspector of Mines, 

services 

Disbursements 

Collins, E. A., 1st Assistant Inspector of llines, 
services for one month. Resigned 



5,000 00 

1.850 00 

811 84 

98 67 

687 74 



3,800 00 
1,292 29 



Brown, A. H., 1st Assistant Inspector of Mines, 

services for nine months. Died 

Disbursements 

McMillan, J. G., 2nd Assistant Inspector of Mines, 

services 

Disbursements 

Bartlett, J., 3rd Assistant Inspector' of Mines, 

services 

Disbursements 

Webster, A. R., 4th Assistant Inspector of Mines, 

services 

Disbursements 



Jackson, P. A., Surveyor, services 
Disbursements 



Estlin, E. S., Natural Gas Commissioner, services 
Beno, J. W., Inspector Gas and Oil Wells, services 
Scott, J., Inspector Gas and Oil Wells, services.. 
Near, A. E., Inspector Gas and Oil Wells, services 

Burn, B. D., Natural Gas Inspector, services 

Estlin, Miss M., Stenographer 

Estlin, Miss E. M., do 

Estling, H., services 

Disbursements 

McArthur, T. A., Inspector of Recorders' Offices, 

services 

Disbursements 



Burwash, Dr. E. M., services 
Disbursements 



Carlyle, A. W., services 
Disbursements . . . . , 



Conners, P. J., services 

Cross. J G., services . . 

Disbursements . . . . 



Dingman, A. H., services 



Carried forward 



2, 250 00 
361 10 

2,546 28 
182 85 

2,817 00 
1,353 32 


3, 000 00 
1,359 90 


1,700 00 
310 19 


3,600 00 
755 73 
937 48 
937 48 
427 88 
234 62 
530 76 
18 00 

3, 480 39 


900 00 
552 66 



558 65 
999 10 



199 23 
15 95 



875 00 
833 53 



25,510 38 1,363,978 98 



8,448 25 

5,092 29 
125 00 

2,611 10 

2,729 13 

4,170 32 

4,359 90 
2,010 19 



10, 922 34 

1,452 66 
1,557 75 



215 18 
129 23 



1,708 53 
191 53 



71,233 78 1,363,978 98 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



33 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward , ^ 

Mines and Mining — Concluded. 



Elliot, G. R., services . . . 

Fair, H. A., services . . . . 

Gibson, G. A. L., services 

Disbursements 



Heisey, K. B.. services 
Disbursements . . . , 



Hunnisett, J. E., services 

Howell, Edwin, services *. 

Kerr-Lawson, D. E., services . 
Kirkconnell, J. R., services . . 
Montgomery, R. W., services . 
Parsons, Prof. A. L., services 
Disbursements 



Presgrave, R., services 

Stevens, Joseph, services . . . . 

Tyrrell, Geo., services 

Weelands, J. E., services 

Nicholas, F., preparing index 

King's Printer 

Express 

Telegraphing 

Typewriter repairs, etc 

Sundries 



iMlNING ReCORDEBS. 



Campbell, C. A., Recorder 

Loudon, W. E., Travelling Draughtsman 

LeClair, Miss H., Stenographer 

Disbursements 



Gauthier, G. H., Recorder 

O'Brien, J. D., Clerk 

Disbursements , 



Loudon, W. E., Travelling Draughtsman 

Matchett, Miss F., Stenographer 

Robertson, Miss M., do 

Disbursements 



Miller, N., Recorder 
Disbursements . 



Morgan, J. W., Recorder 

McDonald, Mrs. M. M., Acting Recorder 
Disbursements 



McAulay. N. J., Recorder 

Sarsfleld, J. M., Clerk 

Munro, Miss E., Stenographer 
Disbursements 



McQuire. H. F., Recorder 
Disbursements 



Carried forward 
3 F.M. 



300 00 
204 85 



136 16 

60 00 



713 46 
634 19 



1,219 24 
330 77 
437 50 
371 05 

1,500 00 
1,138 80 
1,153 49 



Hough, J. A.. Recorder 1 457 73 

Ginn, H. G., Clerk 1 ' q^i qq 



276 92 
135 00 
127 69 
270 30 



1,138 48 
227 45 



1,140 48 
256 73 
384 73 



1,900 00 

1,318 24 

796 74 

772 77 



500 00 
K7 05 



71,233 78 



233 08 
244 62 



504 85 



196 16 
120 00 
253 85 
199 42 
203 08 
191 53 



1,347 65 
233 08 
124 00 
153 64 
244 62 
250 00 

1,111 52 

47 57 

177 60 

12 00 

226 24 



2,358 56 
3, 792 29 

2,908 64 
1,365 93 

1,781 94 
4,787 75 



657 05 
17,652 16 



1,363,978 98 



77,308 29 



1.441,287 27 



34 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Mining Recordebs — Concluded. 



Sheppard, H. E., Recorder 
Disbursements 



Morgan, M. R., Recorder 

Loudon, W. E., Travelling Draughtsman 
Disbursements 



Spry, W. L., Recorder 
Disbursements . . . 



Ginn, H. G., Recorder 

Loudon, W. E., Travelling Draughtsman 

Matchett, Miss P., Stenographer 

Disbursements 



Express 

King's Printer 

Telegraphing 

Typewriter repairs, etc. 



Provincial Assay Office. 



McNeill, W. K. ... 
Disbursements 



Rothwell, T. E. . . . 
Disbursements 



Leat, Arthur , 

Supplies . 

Disbursements 



MINERA.L Display at Exhibitions. 

Johns, Chas., Services re Toronto Exhibition . . . 

McCarthy, C. P., Services re Toronto Exhibition. 

Disbursements 



"West, W. J., Services re Toronto Exhibition 
General Disbursements re Exhibitions 



Reseabch Wobk 

Society Membership Fees 

EXPEEIMENTAL TREATMENT OF OrES . . . 

Special Surveys in Mining Districts 
Natural Gas Advisory Board 



Contingencies. 
Departraental. 



Printing and Binding 
Stationery 



Carried forward 



550 00 
165 03 



541 50 
359 62 
180 05 


956 73 
215 40 



477 24 

112 49 

357 50 

2,324 05 



86 40 

686 57 

6 53 

10 35 



2,456 73 
49 55 



1,736 48 
100 55 



896 99 
278 91 



150 50 
69 80 



1,166 21 
7,066 65 



17,652 16 

715 03 

1,081 17 
1,172 13 

3,271 28 

789 85 



2,506 28 



1,837 03 
556 00 



1,175 90 



31 50 



220 30 

66 00 

2.316 73 



,232 86 
,232 86 



1,441,287 27 



24,681 62 



6,075 21 



2,634 53 
6 10 

243 89 

2,085 43 

1,602 29 

6,460 13 



1,485,076 47 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



35 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Contingencies — Continued. 
Departmental — Concluded. 

Express 

Postage 

Telegraphing 

Car Fare 

Subscriptions 

Advertising 

Typewriters, repairs, etc 

Bindon, F. W., travelling expenses 

Cain, W. C, travelling expenses 

Carrell, W., travelling expenses 

Ferguson, Hon. G. H., travelling expenses 

Grigg, A., travelling expenses 

Hele, C. C., travelling expenses 

Hutcheon. J., travelling expenses 

Keefer, F. H., Services re Level of Lake of the 

Woods 

Robbins, H. M., travelling expenses 

Rorke, L. V., travelling expenses 

"Work, J., travelling expenses 

Extra Clerks 

Maps 

Sundries 



Bureau of Mines. 

Printing and Binding 

Stationery 

Postage . . - 

Telegraphing 

Express and Cartage 

Advertising 

Subscriptions 

Typewriters, repairs, etc 

Gibson, T. W., travelling expenses . . 

Boogers, L. H., translations 

Douglas, D. S., compiling index 

George, H., rock sections 

Stewart, W. A., rock sections 

Royal Ontario Museum, rock sections 

Work, J., services 

Extra Clerks 

Sundries 



258 68 
1,519 97 



Forestry. 



Printing and Binding 
Stationery 



Carried forward 



382 38 
60 00 

331 23 
3,675 55 



50 00 
246 15 

11 27 
1,000 00 

58 85 
255 58 
498 81 

1,503 00 

44 30 

140 55 

129 75 



9, 278 79 

2,200 80 

741 35 



2,594 72 
4, 483 55 

822 05 

118 38 

21 60 

2,205 14 

324 02 



208 40 
124 07 

37 80 
100 00 

62 30 

6 00 

3 00 

150 00 

1,432 44 

38 44 



190 90 
382 11 



8,232 86 



1,778 65 

742 38 

4,006 78 
382 50 



3,938 26 



12,220 94 



7,078 27 



8,491 19 



691 57 
1,470 88 

573 01 



573 01 



1§485,076 47 



81,302 87 



12,731 91 



1,529,110 



36 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought -forward 

Contingencies — Concluded. 
Forestry — Concluded. 

Zavitz, E. J., travelling expenses 

White, J. H., travelling expenses .... 

Postage 

Telegraphing 

Express and Cartage 

Typewriters, repairs, etc 

Supplies 

Sundries 

Colonization. 

Printing and Binding 

Stationery 

Postage 

Express 

Telegraphing 

Subscriptions 

Typewriter repairs, etc. 

Bindon, F. W., travelling expenses . . . 

Argue, J., travelling expenses 

Jones, R. A., travelling expenses 

Macdonell, H. A., travelling expenses 
McGillivray, A. D., travelling expenses 

Tutt, H., travelling expenses 

Sundries 

i i; Colonization Roads. 

Printing and Binding 

Stationery 

Postage 

Express 

Telegraphing 

Subscriptions 

Typewriters, repairs, etc 

Fullerton, C. H., travelling expenses . 
Meader, C. H., travelling expenses . . . 

Extra Clerks 

Sundries 



224 08 


34 


45 


250 


00 


14 


57 


15 


15 


19 00 


51 


08 


243 95 



34 08 
353 89 



350 49 
236 59 


285 21 
49 36 
29 25 



24 50 

25 25 
332 15 
258 92 

64 35 

4 19 

52 02 



448 07 
418 89 

248 82 
4 64 

49 00 

6 50 

317 50 



511 02 
589 15 



1,485 00 
52 05 



573 01 1,529,110 75 



258 53 



593 75 

387 97 
587 08 

363 82 



761 38 



866 96 
253 46 

373 00 
1,100 17 
1,537 05 



1,425 29 



2,100 25 



4,130 64 



1,536,766 93 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG. 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 37 



Appendix No. 7. 

Statement of expenses on account of various services under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Lands, Forests and Mines for the year ending October 31st, 1919. 



Service. 



Algonquin Provincial Park 


31,223 76 


QuETico Provincial Park 

Fuel Investigation 


11,291 69 
118,089 55 


Royal Nickel Commission ; 


46 85 


Veterans' Commutation 

Legal Investigations 


150 00 
2,171 50 


Fuel Problem 


15.000 00 








177,973 35 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



Appendix No. S. 

PATENTS OFFICE. 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued from 1st November, 1918, to 31st October. 1919. 

Public Lands ( late Crown ) 514 

" ( late School ) 32 

(late Clergy) 4 

" (University) 8 

Free Grant Lands (Act of 1913) 292 

(Act of 1901) Veterans 68 

Mining Lands ( Patents) 310 

" " ( Leases) 67 

Crown Leases 13 

Licenses of Occupation 51 

Temagami Island Leases 4 

Sand and Gravel Licenses 12 

Quarry Claims '. 3 

Pine Patents 6 

Orders-In-Council 10 

Total 1,394 

CHARLES S. JONES, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Clerk of Patents. Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 

W. C. CAIN, 
Chief Clerk. 



38 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 
Woods and 

Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground 

Quantity and 





Area 
covered 

by 
timber 
licenses. 


Saw logs. 


Boom and 


Agencies. 


Pine. 


Other. 


Pine. 




Square 
miles. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Western Timber 
District 

Belleville Timber 
District 

Ottawa Timber 
District 


11,700^ 

6571 

3,873i 


4,979,650 

5,661 

328,997 


174,165,661 

315,899 

11,662,880 


793,696 
100,600 
319,253 


23,476,842 
3,349,668 
9,439.867 


46,321 

43 

3,952 


5,353,802 
5.639 

356,888 




16,231 


5,314,308 


186,144,440 


1,213,549 


36,266,377 50,316 


5,716,329 



General Statement 



Agencies . 


Tan 
Bark. 


Railway 
Ties. 


Posts. 


Poles. 


Bolts. 


Pulp- 
wood. 






Cords. 


Pieces. 


Pieces. 


Pieces. 


Cords. Cords. 


Transfer 
Fees. 


Interest. 


Western Timber 

District 

Belleville Timber 
» District 


1,633 
329 
946 


5,131,073 
3,397 
6,184 


44,853 

5,562 

429 


12,806 

20 

2,347 


1,196 304,017 
450 

i 15,728 

1 


$ c. 
5,095 00 


$ c. 
27,108 86 


Ottawa Timber 
District 


110 00 


127 13 




2,908 


5,140,654 


50,844 


15,173 


1,196 320,195 


5,205 00 


27,235 99 



JOHN HOUSER, 

Chief Clerk in charge. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



39 



No. 9. 

Forests. 

Reat and Bonus during the year ending 31st October, 1919. 

Description of Timber. 



Dimension. 








Tin: „ 




TJIi 




Cordwood. 


Other. 








Hard. 


Soft. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Cubic 
Feet. 


Lineal pj^^^^^ 
feet. 


Feet 
B.M. 


Pieces 


Lineal 
Feet. 


Cords. 


Cords. 


9.517 
1 440 


1,070,460 
258 266 


1,131 


70,287 


197,233 


3,415 


343,399 


596 


17,960 


22,595 

216 

1,500 


45,141 


4,205 


466,489 
















5.424 






















15,162 


1,795,215 


1,131 


70,287 


197,233 


3,415 


343 ,399 


596 


17,960 


24,311 


50,565 



of Timber.— Concluded. 



Amounts accrued. 



Trespass. 


Timber 
dues. 


T, Deposit Ground Fire 

timber sales. rent. protection. 


Total. 


$ c. 

23.863 60 

4 988 18 


$ c. 

883.668 03 

2,997 90 
32.455 58 


$ c. 
597.062 77 

154 68 


$ c. 
438,115 00 


$ c. 
63,978 25 

3,360 00 

20,250 00 


$ c. 
143,758 85 

4,603 80 

26,304 20 


$ c. 

2,182,650 36 

16,104 56 


556 93 




79.803 84 










29,408 71 


919.121 51 


597.217 45 


*438;115 00 


*87,588 25 


*174,666 85 2,278,558 76 



* Amount actually received. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister. 



40 . KEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 10. 

WOODS AND FORESTS BRANCH. 

Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending October 31st, 1919. 

Amount of Western Collections at Department $1,733,550 52 

do Belleville Collections at Department 10,582 26 

do Ottawa Collections at Department 58,948 58 



$1,803,081 36 



WOODS AND FORESTS. 

Bonus. . $872,598 69 

Timber dues . 662,928 30 

Ground rent 87,682 52 

Transfer fees • • 5,205 00 

Fire protection 174,666 85 



$1,803,081 36 



WOODS AND FORESTS BRANCH REVENUE, 

October 31st, 1919. 
Western District — 

Timber dues $621,318 02 

Bonus 434,176 54 

Ground rent 63,978 25 

Interest on dues 27,069 38 

Interest on ground rent 39 48 

Transfer fees 5,095 00 

Timber sale deposit 438,115 00 

Fire protection 143,758 85 



$1,733,550 52 



Ottawa District — 

Timber dues $12,157 25 

Ground rent 20,250 00 

Interest on dues 72 34 

Interest on ground rent 54 79 

Transfer fees 110 00 

Fire protection 26,304 20 



$58,948 58 



Belleville District — 

Timber dues $2,311 31 

Bonus 307 15 

Ground rent 3,360 00- 

Fire protection ;..:.... 4,603 80 



10,582 26 



$1,803,081 36 



JOHN HOUSER, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. Deputy Minister. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 41 



Appendix No. 11. 

Statement of work done in the Military Office, Lands Branch of the Department of Lands 
and Forests, during the year ending October 31st, 1919. 

Reference for Veterans' Patents issued 34 

Locations under military certificates 45 

Certificates applied in payment of lands .... 6 

Certificates surrendered for commutation money 3 

Letters received 1,572 

Letters written 1,869 

Special letters to agents 200 

Special letters to mining recorders 260 

Maps and reports supplied to veterans 150 

Printed forms sent out 90 

Copies of Veteran Act supplied 27 

H. E. JOHNSTON, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Military Clerk. Deputy Minister. 

W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 



Appendix No. 12. 
Memorandum of parties who passed the Cullers' Examination of 1919. 

Acheson, Lloyd, Box 1792, North Bay, Ontario, examined at North Bay, October 8th, 
1919, licensed October 14th, 1919. 

Mantel, Ross, Milnet, Ontario, examined at North Bay, October 8th, 1919,. licensed 
October 14th, 1919. 

McCool, Lawrence, Sudbury, Ontario, examined at North Bay, October 8th, 1919, 
licensed October 14th, 1919. 

McGregor, W. H., Sturgeon Falls, Ontario, examined at North Bay, October 8th, 1919, 
licensed October 14th, 1919. 

JOHN HOUSER, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. Deputy Minister. 



4 P.M. 



43 EEPOKT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No, 13. 

Record Branch, 1918-19. 
Communications received: 

From Crown Lands Agents 7,183 

" Mining Recorders 3,476 

Crown Timber Agents 4,389 

" Homestead Inspectors 1,527 

" Superintendent, Algonquin Park 460 

" Superintendent, Quetico Park 112 

Orders-in-Council 297 

Telegrams 398 

Soldiers and Sailors (letters) 526 

Nickel Commission (Figures supplied by them) 800 

Northern Development Branch " " " 8,367 

Colonization Branch " " " 9,381 

Loan Commissioner " " " 2,767 

Mining Commissioner " " " 3,123 

Forestry Branch " " " 13,134 

Mine Assessor " " " 1,826 

Mine Inspector " " " 818 

Provincial Geologist " " " 472 

Colonization Roads (since May 14th, 1919) " " " 3,529 

All other sources 28,060 



Total incoming (Minister's office not included) 90,645 

Communications sent out: 

To Crown Agents, Inspectors, Rangers and Park Superintendents 18,872 

" General Public 22,340 

" Circular Letters (timber sales) 3,210 

Maps and blue prints 3,606 

Mining Reports to foreign countries 580 

Mining Reports to United States and other countries 3,000 

Mining Acts 2,200 

Nickel Commission (letters) (Figures supplied by them) 600 

Nickel Commission (reports) " " " 450 

Northern Development Branch (letters) " " " 6,715 

Northern Development Branch (seed grain) ... " " " 1,509 

Colonization Branch (letters) " " " 7,781 

Colonization Branch (Northern Ontario litera- 
ture) " " " 28,568 

Colonization Branch (Ontario maps) " " " 7.177 

Loan Commissioner 4,955 

Mining Commissioner (letters) 7,067 

Mining Commissioner (orders) 878 

Forestry Branch (letters) 6,504 

Forestry Branch ( circulars ) 2,300 

Forestry Branch (parcels by post) 810 

Mine Assessor 1,865 

Mine Inspector 711 

Provincial Geologist 318 

Colonization Roads (since May 14th, 1919) 2,906 



Total outgoing (Minister's office not included) 134,922 

Postage : 

Postage for the year , Records Branch $2,975 20 

" " " Colonization Branch 306 12 

" " " Loan Commissioner 180 00 

Forestry Branch 350 00 

" " " Colonization Roads (silice May 14th) 153 40 

Files : 

New files Issued, general ". 4,623 

" " " accounts chargeable 549 

" " " accounts free .' 175 

S. K. BURDIN, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Chief Clerk, Records Branch. Deputy Minister. 



1918-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



43 



Appendix No. IJ^. 



Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of acres sold ; 
of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties and of patents issued in 
Free Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1919, 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


i 

©■—I 


CO 

iz; 


CO 

ft 
« 
w 

S3 

u-i 
O 

d 

2; 


2 

o 

CO 

m 

I 

O 

d 




11 

•4-1 ^ 

o to 

d ^ 


CO 

■*-> 

d 

1 O to 

\ . to 
©•'- 


to . ' 
U « 

dS 


Baxter 

Brunei 

Cardwell . . . 


Muskoka 

Parry Sound.. 
Parry Sound . 


J. B. Brown, Brace- 
bridge 

Miss 1. M. Campbell, 
" Parry Sound 

Dr. J. S. Freeborn, 

" Magnetawan 

« » 
ti <t 


2 

1 
4 
2 


281 
201 
652 
298 


1 
1 


3 
1 


1 
1 

2 
3 


201 
201 
380 
298 


3 

1 

2 
1 
1 
4 
3 


277 
201 
352j 


Chaffey . . . 






200 


Draper 






95 


Franklin .... 
Freeman .... 


1 
1 
2 
3 


95 
100 
164 
203 


1 
1 


3 
25 


1 


95 


208 
200 


Macaulay .... 


1 
1 


64 
203 




Medora 










Monck . 










Morrison .... 
Muskoka 


6 


1,007 


1 

4 

1 
1 

1 


25 
lOff 

111 

34 
3 
6 


4 


553 


3 
5 
4 
3 
3 


120 
225 


McLean 

Oakley 

Ridout 

Ryde 


1 
2 
1 
5 
2 
1 


134 
185 
199 
701 
145 
228 


1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 


134 
85 

199 

601 
55 

228 


500 
280 
267 


Sherborne .... 
Sinclair 


1 
2 


14J 

28 


3 


360 


Stephenson... 






Stisted 


2 
3 
3 


287 
309 
479 






1 
2 
5 


100 
200 
779 


1 
4 
6 


200 


Watt . , 

Wood 

Blair 


1 

4 

1 


1 
17 

19 


220 
675 


Burpee 














Carling 

Christie 


5 
2 
3 


654 
200 
300 


3 


205J 


2 
2 
4 


278 
200 
782 


10 


900 


Conger 

Cowper 


1 


100 


3 
1 
1 


10 
4 


Foley 














20 


Ferguson . .. 


3 
1 


306 
202 






2 


200 




Hagerman . . . 










Harrison 






3 


251 


13 

1 


85 


Henvey 


1 


50 






83J 


Humphrey ... 










McConkey.... 


1 

1 
3 


100 
100 
500 










3 

1 


134 


McDougall . . . 
McKellar .... 


1 


83 


1 
2 


100 
400 


83 


McKenzie .... 






2 
1 
4 
1 

1 
1 


375 


Monteith 


8 


1,152 






5 


717 


254 


Shawanaga . . 


1 
1 

2 


16 
3 

95 


32 


Wilson 

Chapman .... 
Croft 


3 

1 
2 


386 

64 
200 


1 

1 
3 


98 

64 
404 


200 

100 
200 


Ferric 












Gurd 

Lount 


3 
2 

1 
1 
4 


273 
300 
196 
100 
500 


1 


2 


3 
2 
1 


276 

300 

99 


3 


402 


Machar 






6 


860 


Mills 








Pringle 


1 


2 


107 


1 


200 


4 


695 



44 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IJ^. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


i 

£ • 

°§ 

iz; 


Si 
o— ' 

S2; 


09 

cn 

a 

1 

o, 

•4-1 

o 
d 


CO 

s 

o 
6 


d s 


11 

O CO 

d f" 


O CO 

. » 

2; 


P 


Ryerson 


Parry Sound.. 

Parry Sound.. 

II 

Parry Sound . . 

II 
Nipissing 

Haliburton ... 

Peterborough . 

Haliburton . . . 
Peterborough . 

Haliburton . . . 

Hastings 

Renfrew 


Dr. J. S. Freeborn, 

Magnetawan 
II II 

David Thaw, Emsdale 
(1 II 

H. J. Ellis, Powassan. 
II II 

W. J. Parsons, North 
" Bay 

II II 
R. H. Baker, Minden. . 

William Hales, Apsley 

A. N. Wilson, Kinmount 

W. J. Douglas, May- 

"nooth 
11 «> 

Adam Prince , Wilno. . . 






1 


100 






4 
1 
4 

2 


479 


Spence 










200 


Strong 




100 






2 


299 


480 


Armour 


1 


8 


300 


Bethune ..... 












Joly 


f- 


792 

100 

100 

91 


1 
1 


108 
8 


7 
2 
1 


891 
300 
100 


4 
2 


580 


McMurrich . . . 
Perry 


200 


Proudfoot .... 










Hardy 














Himsworth . . 


8 
4 
3 


1,100 
603 
483 






6 
3 
2 


911 
500 
326 


7 

1 
4 

1 

4 
1 
5 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1,186 


Laurier 






100 


Nipissing .... 






325 


Patterson. . .. 






186 


Bonlield 

Boulter 


6 

3 

14 

6 

1 


7681 
3501 
1,666 
559 

182 


1 


11 


4 

3 

11 

5 


368^ 
250i 
1,132 
459 

182 


330 
200 


Chisholm .... 
Ferris 


2 


14 


685 
395 


Anson 






100 


Glamorgan . . 






287 


Hindon 














98 


Lutterworth. . 














160 


Minden 












100 




Snowdon .... 














Stanhope 


1 
1 


100 
98 








100 






Anstruther .. . 






.... 




Burleigh, N.D. 












S.D. 












93 


1 
1 
1 

4 


175 


Chandos 


1 
2 

3 
3 
1 
4 

3 
1 

1 
4 
2 
6 


110 

300 

388 
348 
125 
333 

268 

199 

100 

474J 

203 

639J 

200 

256 

101 

200 

400 






174 


Methuen 








100 

392 
224 


200 


Cardiff 

Cavendish. . . . 


1 
4 
1 
1 


122 

62 

m 

7 


450 


Galway 


2 
3 


117 J 
369 


Monmouth . . . 
Bangor 


5 

2 

1 


420 

189 
100 


Carlow 






4 

1 


277 


Cashel 






200 


Dungannon . . 






1 


88 




Faraday 


1 
2 
1 
1 
3 


i 
104 
5 
56 

7 


1 
5 
1 
5 
6 
1 
2 


66 


Herschel 

Limerick 

Mayo 

Monteagle . . . 


3 
2 
1 


345 
300 
128 


640 

100 

740 

1,000 


McClure 






97 


Wicklow .... 


2 


89 






247 


Wollaston,... 


1 


195 




Algona, S. ... 




100 










Brougham.... 










3 
1 
2 


500 


Brudenell .... 


b 


590 






4 


362 


200 


Burns 


1 


2 


56i 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OP LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



45 







Appendix No. IJf 


. — Continued. 












Township. 


i 

1 
1 

District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


g 
. o 


«t-i e3 

2; 


t 

CO 

1 

•s 

1 


1 

09 
09 

2 

o 

o 
d 


CO 


•si 

d ^ 

:z; 


to 

«4-. S 

O CO 
. M 

o — 




G rattan .... 


Renfrew 

» 
» 

Renfrew 

ft 
<• 

« 
Nipissing .... 

Algoma 

Algoma 

« 

Algoma 

Algoma 

Thunder Bay. 

•• 


Adam Princci Wilno. . . 






2 


128 






2 


1285 


Griffith 


•• It 
tt It 
tt tt 
ti It 
It tt 

It tt 

tt tt 

Finlay Watt, Pembroke 
tt It 

tt It 
tt tt 

it tt 
tt tt 

tt tt 

Robt. Small, Mattawa 

It It 
tt It 

Edward Noble, Sault 
" Ste. Marie 

Thos. Dodds , Thessalon 
It It 

It It 

ti tt 

It It 

W. E. Whybourne. 

MarksTille 

Edward Arthurs, 

" Espanola 

W. A. Burrows, Port 
" Arthur 


2 


150 








Hagarty • • 










1 
2 


50 


Jones 


2 
3 


143^ 
250 










200 


Lyell 






2 


205 




Lyndoch 










Mata watchan . 


1 
4 
3 
6 
3 
1 


100 
551 
283 
797 
285 
121 






1 
2 
3 
4 
3 
2 


100 
269 
410 
401 
285 
171 


2 
1 
2 
4 


260 


Radcliffe .... 
Raglan . 


2 


103 


195 
325 


Richards 






400 


Sebastopol . . 
Sherwood . . . 


.., 






1 

1 
5 
2 


87 


Algona N 






100 


Alice 














475 


Buchanan .... 


7 
3 
1 
2 


817 

461 

99 

196 


2 

1 


82 
57 






200 


Clara 








Fraser 


1 
1 


100 
100 


1 

1 


55 


Head 






165 


Maria . . . . 








McKay 


















Petawawa ... 


5 

1 


472 
112 






3 

1 


301 
100 


2 


200 


Rolph 








Wilberforce . . 






1 
1 

2 
3 


170 


Wylie (pt.) ... 


1 

2 
13 

4 
1 
2 


200 

212 
1,466 
493 
100 
200 






1 

3 
7 
2 
3 
3 


100 

283 
686 
292 
291 
300 


100 


Calvin . ... 






310 


Cameron (pt.). 






500 


Lauder . 








Mattawan. . . . 






1 


198 


Papineau . . 






111 


Korah . . 








Parke 


















Prince . 


1 


160 






1 


^0 


1 
• 7 


108 


Aberdeen .... 


1 


80 


580 


ad. 












Galbraith .... 














2 


3185 


Lef roy 














Plummer .... 


















ad. 



















St. Joseph Is'd 


7 


722 






7 


738 


7 


82Q 


St. Joseph 

Ch'nl Is'd 








Baldwin 

Merritt 


8 
2 

1 
3 


1,118J 
309i 

160. 
400 


1 


157a 


1 

1 

1 
4 
1 
6 
3 


162 
150 

160 
5545 
72 
469 
4295 


\ 

1 


1585 
1595 


Blake 






Conmee 

Crooks 


2 
1 
1 

1 


13a 

30 
40 
80 


6 
3 
4 
5 
3 
7 


600 
508 


Dawson Road. 
Dorion ....... 

Gillies 


7 
2 
1 
2 


569 
280 
801 
223^ 


475 
626 
465 


Gorham 

Lybster 


2 

1 
2 
3 

1 


96J 
80 
8U 
66 
•lOi 


1 

2' 
3 


160 
181 
401 
616 


9S0 


Marks........ 

McGregor .... 

Mclntyre .... 


1 
3 


80 
457 


2 

Ij 


3215 
2 



46 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. l-k. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


i 

m 

Si 

o o 
. o 


tn 

9 . 

. o 
o—' 


2 

CO 

1 

ft 
"g 

d 


CO 
CO 

2 



eS 

■s 

d 



ft'aj 

11 


CO 

d f^ 


s 

ft jj 

•)H 
CO 
. CO 


It 


O'Connor 

Oliver 


Thunder Bay. 
Rainy River.. 

Rainy River.. 
* « 

Kenorn. 


W. A. ] 
Williai 


Burrows, Port 
Arthur 

n Cameron, 

Stratton 


1 
3 
1 


162 
481 
100 


2 


4 


1 

3 

1 


162 

482 
100 


3 
3 

1 

1 


478 
400 


Paipoonge.N R 






100 


SR 






189 


Pardee 


1 

3 

5 

12 


160 

354 

678 

1,8361 












Pearson 






1 
4 
9 


160 
558J 
1,435 


4 
3 
3 
1 

8 

***2 
1 


641 


Scoble 






429 


Stirling 

Strange 


3 


103J 


196 
156 


Ware 

Atwood 


3 


480 


1 


631 


8 


1,2531 


950 


Blue 


5 


430J 


1 

1 


2 
2 


4 
2 


4721 
322 


243 


Curran 


• 162 


Dewart 








Dilke 


















Morley. 

Morson 


5 

12 
4 
2 
4 
3 


487 
1,685| 
4793 
2391 
406 
381ii. 


4 


4 
284J 

""9" 
167 


3 
11 
5 
2 
3 
1 


405 
1 , 1661 
6411 
238 
322 
40 


1 

1 


81 
140 


Nelles 

Pattullo... .. 
Pratt 


3 
3 
1 


242 
488 
160 


Rosebery .... 










Shenston. . , . 


1 
4 
2 
6 
2 
3 


81 
561J 
323 
881 
164 
4981 






1 
3 
2 
6 
2 
3 


81 
4404 
344 
7911 
246 
3571 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 


155 


S if ton . 






160 


Spohn 

Sutherland ... 

Tait 

Tovell 


1 
2 
2 


2 

96f 
8 


1595 

40 

164 

880 


Worthington. . 


1 


114 




Aylsworth 


Alex. Mf^Tfavrlpn 'RImn_ 














Barwick . . , . 






















Burriss . . 


1 
2 
3 
3 


159J 
223 
444 
514 






1 
2 
2 
6 


159J 
223 
281 
1,029 J 




/ ■ '■ 


Carpenter ... . 

Crozier 

Dance 

Devlin . ... 


2 

1 
1 


1001 
2 

2 


2 

1 

1 


358 
162 
162 


Dobie 

Fleming 


3 


4651 


2 


27J 


3 
1 
2 

1 
2 
4 
5 
2 


465J 
160J 
3181 
81 
336 
5961 
803i 
368J 


3 


413 


Kingsf ord .... 


2 
1 
3 
4 
4 
2 


318i 
81 
496J 
656J 
6381 
319 






1 
1 
,2 
3 
1 


40^ 


Lash 


1 

1 


2 

79J 


162 


Mather 

Miscampbell . 


159 
460 


Potts 

Richardson. . . 


1 

1 


16 

80 


176 


Roddick 






Woodyatt .... 


















Aubrey . . . 


J. E. Gil^o^Ti Drvrlpn 


6 


842^ 






6 
1 
3 
1 
3 


810J 

160J 

400 

160 

476 


4 


485 


Britton 
















Eton 


•4 
2 


547 
2431 


1 


80 


6 


960 


Langton 




Melgund 






.2 
3 


60 


Mutrie 


2 
2 


3021 
359 






415 


Redvers 






1 


1605 




Rowell 










Rugby .. ..... 


















Sanford 

Southworth . . 


4 

7 


552 
744 




35| 


16 
4 


2,2931 
421 


J 


400 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



47 



Appendix No. IJf. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


m 



o 

Si 


•si 

o— ' 


2 

ai 

ei 


P. 

«IH 
O 


i 

CO 
Oi 

2 

o 

e4 
<i-i 
o 

d 

52; 


CO 

to '^ 

11 


to . 

<i-i 

w 

<u 
6 ^ 


CO 



«fH 
CO 
. CO 


to . 

11 
It 


Temple 


Kenora 

Kenora 

Sudbury 


J. E. Gibson, Dryden.. 






1 
1 

1 


10 
80 
751 


I 

7 
5 
5 

6 
4 

1 
1 
1 
1 


80 1 1 

316 3 

1,0331 1 

795 J 1 


10 


Van Home . . . 
Wabigoon .... 
Wainwright .. 


W. L. Spry, Kenora. . . 
J. K. MacLennan, Sud- 


2 
1 
6 
2 

1 
1 


816 

im 

953J 
444J 

160 
110 


160 

145i 

1184 


Zealand 

Melick 

Pellatt 

Balfour 


5 

1 

1 


270 

1 
36 


763 

881 
519 

159^ 
40 


6 
4 

1 


276 

460 
125 


Blezard 


Sudbury 

It 
Nipissing .... 

« 
>< 

Lennox and 

Addington 
Frontenac... 

Lennox and 

Addington 
Frontenac .... 

Haliburton — 
Nipissing 

Temiskaming. 


" bury 
II i< 

11 II 
II <i 

II II 
II II 

John Brown, Markstay 
II II 

i< II 
J. A. Philion, Sturgeon 

II II 
li II 

Charles Both, Denbigh 
II II 

II II 

II 11 

Unattached 


1 
2 
1 


160 

268i 

1631 






? 


200 


Broder 






114|l 2 
16311 1 


262J 
144 


Capreol 






Chapleau 












Dill 














1 

1 


160 


Garson 

Hanmer 


2 


2531 


1 


88 


1 

1 


160 


248 


Lumsden 


3 
2 


323 
240 






2 


317J 






Morgan 


1 


80 






Neelon 




1 


157 


Rayside 














Appelby 


4 

4 

1 

22 

1 
4 
5 

2 
2 
3 


639J 
627J 
161 
3, 458 J 
166^ 
649 
814J 

320 

319J 

452* 












Casimir 

Dunnet 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


7 

1 

160 

U 

7 


1 


160i 


3 
1 
3 


487 
161 


Hagar 

Jennings 


12 


1,891 


462J 


Kirkpatrick .. 
Ratter 


1 
2 


183i 
320 


J 


120 


Caldwell 






2 
5 


231 


Cosby........ 






! 


650 


Grant 






1 


135 




Macpherson . . 






3 
2 


477J 
309J 


Mart land 


2 
3 

2 


298 
340 

196 






3 
1 

1 


455 
100 

96 


Springer 






Abinger 






1 


100 


Canonto, S.... 








N... 
















Clarendon . . . 






1 




4 
2 


500 


Denbigh.. . 


5 


681 






5: 


654 


398 


Miller (pt.) . . . 








Palmerston 
















McClintock . . . 
















Airy 


« 


6 
5 
4 
3 

29 

10 

2 


667 

64 

388^ 

391 

2,535 
990 
194 






' 


3 
7 
1 

4 


472 


Finlayson.... 


6 


74 




89 


Murchison ... 


1 


200 


41 


Sabine 






650 


*0'Brien 










*0\vens 












*Williamson.. 




















. . . • 






576 


72,420.5 


140 


4, 878 J 


425 55,278i 


431 


49,6855 



^Ijocated under Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act, 1917 
No. of lots assigned 253 No. of acres assigned 34,123 



48 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



By Special Regulations under Order in Council, dated 7tli February, 1919, Returned 
Soldiers were permitted to acquire fifee grant locations or have their arrearsi due the 
Crown in respect of land for settlement purposes remitted, and the following list com- 
prises the extent of such transactions.' 



In Sale Tebbitoey. 



District. Agency 

Algoma Thessalon 

Nipissing North Bay . . . 

Markstay 

Sudbury Espanola . . . . 

Massey 

Timiskaming Haileybury . . 

" New Liskeard 

Elk Lake 

" Englehart . . . 

" Matheson . . . . 

" Cochrane .... 

Algoma Hearst 

Peterboro Unattached . . 



In Fkee Grant Territory. 



Number 


No. 


arrears 


Locations 


remitted 


1 






3 




1 


1 




• • 


2 






1 




, , 


2 




1 


1 




9 


1 




, , 


9 




7 


23 




30 


66 




32 


24 




10 


2 




•• 



136 



Total 



90 



226 



Thunder Bay Port Arthur 

Parry Sound Parry Sound 

Kenora Kenora 

Nipissing North Bay ., 

" Unattached . 

Rainy River Stratton .... 

Sudbury Sudbury . . . 

Muskoka Bracebridge 

Hastings Maynooth . . . 

Renfrew Pembroke . . 



21 



21 



247 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



49 



Appendix No. IJf. — Concluded. 



ISLANDS SOLD 



Township 



District or County 



Agent 



No. of Acres 
sold 



Harrison : Parcels 4 & 5 of Island 
1143a 



Conger: Part Island B 90 . 
Shawanaga : Island C 389 . 
Cowper: Island B349.... 



Harrison : 
Carling : 



Harrison : 
Conger : 



13a. 
C 372. . 
C 42.. 
C 23.. 
C 24.. 

178.. 

419.. 
B 17.. 
B 19.. 



Parry Sound. 



Shawanaga : Island 395a 

" 987b 

Harrison: Parcel 6 of Island 96a 
" 14&75 " ' 
" 2 of "26a 

Island 497a 

" 516a 

" '' 553a 

" 559a 

" 557a 

Cavendish : Island No. 2 Catcha- 

coma Lake 

* ' Island No. 3 Catcha- 

conia Lake 

Island No. 4 Catcha- 

coma Lake 

* * Island No. 6 Catcha- 

coma Lake , 

Franklin: Vimy Ridge Is' and . 

Watt : Balthayock 

Sherborne : Pt. Denison Island, 

Hollow Lake . . . 
Morrison : Lalla Rookh Island 
Temple: Pt. Island 55, Eagle Lake 
Melick : Island N, Black Sturgeon 

Lake 

Nipissing : Pt. Island B, South Bay 
Macgregor : Island No. 17 



Miss J. M. Campbell, 

Parry Sound 



Peterborough. 



Muskoka 



Haliburton . 
Muskoka . . 
Kenora . . . . 



Parry Sound . 
Thunder Bay. 



A. N. Wilson, Kinmount. 



J. B. Brown, Bracebridge 



J. E. Gibson, Dryden. 



W. L. Spry, Kenora .... 
H. J. Ellis, Powassan . 
W. A. Burrows, Port 

Arthur 



10 

7.10/100 
1^ 

3.70/100 
6.90/100 
1.36/100 
II 



7.35/100 
5.15/100 
15/100 
1.02/100 
1.80/100 
1.40/100 

16.40/100 

16 
9 

21 

14 

2.40/100 
60/100 

I 

1.30/100 
90/100 

8 

16 

28 

2 

53/100 
61 

1.27/100 
10 

1 
23 



244 



SELBY DRAPER, Free Grants Clerk. 
W. C. CAIN, Chief Clerk. 



ALBERT GRIGG. 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



50 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 15. 



Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold ; of lots resumed for non-per- 
formance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than Free 
Grant during the year ending 31st October, 1919. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


•31 
1" 


U CO 
Pi <0 


CO ^ 

11 


CO . 


CO 

s . 

P « 

. CO 


c8"3 

6 ft 


Blount 

Brower 

Calder 

Clute.. 




S J De"'"°''^ nnp.Virnnp 














J 










135 


1 


2 


295J 






6 
5 


649 


1,653 


13 


13 


1,920 


780 


Colquhoun 

Fauquier 

Fournier 

Fox 




1,984 


14 


4 


599 


5 
1 

1 
8 


863 

158J 

1491 


1,116 
152 
151 
168J 
289 
6381 
966J 
501 

3181 
1581 
200 

160J 
3191 
916 
480 
3 
320 
360 
4301 

45 
161 
159 

41 

80 


8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
7 
3 

3 

1 
2 

1 
2 
8 
3 
1 
2 
10 
4 

\ 

1 
1 

1 


10 
4 
1 


1,589J 
601 
150 


Glackmeyer .. 

Kennedy 

Lamarche .... 

Leitch 

Newmarket. .. 


1,112 


2 


319 


1 
3 
2 


145 
470 
319 












Shackleton . . . 

Catharine 

Chamberlain . . 
Dack 


1 


23i 




Jos Wool li Tiers TflnplpVinri 


4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
7 
1 


625J 
159 
319 
37S 
317 
479J 
1,054 
160 










4 
3 
1 

1 


588^ 
456 


Eby 


371 


Evanlurel .... 

Gross 

Ingram 

Marter 

Marquis 

Ot.to 


161J 


2 
3 


242 
350 






4 
19 


241 J 


Pacaud 

Pense 

Robillard 

Savard 

Sharpe 

Truax 

Armstrong . . . 
Auld 


1 

1 
1 
3 


1591 
160 
161 
481 


917J 


6 
3 
2 
1 

6 


918^ 
467J 
248J 
162J 

7164 








J W B"!"*^^ Mpwt T.ic_ 












' " keard 






Beauchamp . . . 

Brethour 

Bryce 

Bucke 


468J 

687 

160 


3 
5 

1 


3 

1 
3 


472 
158 
480 


8 
5 
2 
5 
4 

10 
4 
3 
9 
6 
7 
6 
3 

12 


1,281 J 
784 
3171 
5001 
479 


160 
200 


1 
3 






Casey 

Dymond 

Firstbrook .... 

Harley 

Harris 

Henwood 

Hilliard ; 

Hudson 

Kerns 

Lundy 

Tudhope 

Smyth 

Lorrain 


2 


80 


l,332i 
558^ 
250 

1 174 


162J 


1 


8 


1,249 J 


316i 
962J 
784 


2 
6 
5 






684 


■"3 


480 


1,042 
937 




483J 
1,238 












1 
2 


165J 
283i 








5 
3 
1 


204J 
1801 
176 


Temiskammg. 
Temiskaming 


Mark Morgan, Elk Lake 

Neil J. McAulay, Hailey- 
bury 


163J 
201 


1 
3 


2 


319J 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



51 



Appendix No. 15. — Continued. 



Township. 



District 

or 
County. 



Agent. 



M 


I . 


^^"^ 


U 


h c« 




O 


s ^ 


cS^ 


eS , 


Pi 0) 


CO 0) 


o —> 


-^ 


'^a 








6 «= 


o « 


o « 


^23 


!2i 


1^ 



03 a 



Oi 0) 



Ft? 



Beatty 

Benoit 

Bond 

Bowman 

Calvert.. . . .. 

Carr , 

Clergue 

Currie 

Dundonald . . . 

Evelyn 

German 

Hislop 

Matheson 

Mount joy 

McCart 

Playfair 

Stock 

Taylor 

Walker , 



Temiskaming. F. E. Ginn, Matheson 



Casgrain 
Eilber . . . 
Hanlan . . 
Kendall . 
Lowther . 



Forbes . 
Lyon . . . 
Nepigon 



Algoma . 



Thunder Bay. 



T. V. Anderson, Hearst. 



W. A. Burrows, Port 

" Arthur 



Aweres Algoma E.Noble,SaultSte.Marie 

Tarentorus . .. ; " " " 

Vankoughnet 



Wat ten , 



Bright . . . 
Day 

Glsuistone 
Haughton . 
Johnson . . . 
Kirk wood. 
Parkinson 
Patton . . . 

Rose 

Striker .. 
Thompson 
Wells .... 

Drayton .. 

Hallam . . . 
Harrow . . 

May 

Salter .... 
Shedden . . 
Victoria . . 



Dowling , 

Scollard , 
Mason . . , 



Rainy River. . C. J. Hollands, Fort 

{ Frances 

Algoma jThos. Dodds, Thessalon 



Kenora W. L. 

Sudbury R. W. 



Algoma. 



Sudbury . 
Nipissing 



Spry, Kenora .... 
Teasdale, Massey 



J. K. MacLennan, Sud- 
bury 
J. A. Philion, Sturgeon 
" Falls 



1501 
483J 
3231 

\m 

251 

670 



613 



1656 
760 



l,134i 

620 

1,767 J 



317 



430 



882 
113 
595 

384 
161 
4641 



80 
188 

296 



289 
230 



160 

974 

160^ 

159J 



1021 



160J 
162a 



247J 
828 
1,768 
640J 
140 
817i 
486 
322 
618 



387 
36 
603 
32U 
638i 
151J 



446 



2,810 

"'362' 

112 

320 

1,981 



142 
258 



135i 



83| 



160 



793i 
161 
1 
375 
2431 
1,400 
223 
423 



172 
36 

76 



900 

144 

470i 

14 

750 



97 
710 



7 

291 

1,224 



400 



135 
156 
472 
127 
230 
83J 
680 
154 



93 

964 

159J 

418 

160 

3011 

220 

583 

16U 
2 



52 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 15. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


o 

6 M 


1^ 

Pi <o 
O « 


tOprt 
to 4> 

= 1 

6 « 


U 

O M 

62 


CO 

Id 
1 • 

O CO 

. cr 
o •- < 


No. of acres 
patented. 


Hugel 

Widdifleld .... 


Nipissing 

Nipissing 

Sudbury 

Renfrew ..... 

Lennox 

Grey 

Bruce 

Frontenac . . . 
Lanark 

Essex 

Norfolk 

Ontario 

Vietoria 

Grenville 

Peterborough. 

Hastings 

« 

Lennox and 

1 Addington 


John Brown, Markstay. 

W. J. Parsons, North Bay 

Edward Arthurs, 

Espanola 
Unattached 


2,0241 
1,832 J 


15' 

1 
12 






6 

8 


995 


9 


1,313J 


1,078 


Admaston .... 


248 
500 
290 
100 
100 


2 
4 
2 
1 
1 






5 
7 
2 


654 


Bagot 

Blithfield 








1.800 


X 




, 


480 




<( 










« 






2 

1 


180 


Westmeath. . . 


.. 






78J 


EflBngham .... 


Unattached 


117 

84 
45 


1 

1 
1 






TTnlnHar .... 








3 
3 

5 
1 
3 
5 
5 
1 
2 
4 
3 

4 


310J 
200 


Sheffield 


« 






Bentinck 


Unattached 






401 








■ 




76 


Egremont .... 

(rlPTlP.lfir 


•i 




1 




200 


M 




1 




404 


Holland • . 


<< 


30 


1 
1 






411J 

h 

198i 

347i 




X 






Osprey 

Proton 


« 






« 










Rnnivan .... 


« 










250 




Unattached 










243 


















•< 










8 
5 
3 

2 

1 


523 


Elderslie 


« 










583 


Huron 


« 










200 


Rarrip 


Unattached .... . . . 


67 
200 


3 

1 






2 


Olden 








200 


Beckwith 


Unattached 








Darling 




100 
200 

105 


1 
1 

1 






1 


100 




I, 








Sandwich E. . 


Unattached 






1 
2 

i 

3 


50 


Haughlon 

Rama 


Unattached 






Unattached 










100 


Garden 












284 


Dalton 














Laxtoh 


.1 










1 
2 

1 

3 

1 


100 


Somerville . . . 


« 


299 

50 

. 145 


2 
1 
2 






251 


Edwardsburgh 


Unattached 






50 


Harvey 


Unattached 




144 


535 


Smith 




100 


Elzevir 


Unattached .... . . . • 


61J 
224 
99 

100 
151 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 








Grimsthorpe . . 
Tudor 












« 






4 


367 


Ashby 


Unattached 








Sheffield 








9 


I 380 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



53 



Appendix No. 15. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


CO 

% 
52; 


ti CO 
S ^ 

Pi <U 


6 " 


en . 

!3 


CO 

s 

. CO 


to . 
d » 


Kitely 


Leeds 

Stormont.... 

Simcoe 

Wellington... 

Welland 

Wentworth .. 
Temiskaming. 

Sudbury 

Nipissing 

Kenora 

Thunder Bay. 

Thunder Bay. 
Kenora 

i 

Algoma 


Unattached 


151 


1 






1 
1 

2 
2 


151 


Elizabethtown. 








100 


Cornwall 


Unattached 


145 

100 

16 


2 
1 

2 






145 


Roxborough . . . 








200 


Matchedash . . . 


Unattached 








Arthur 


Unattached 






1 

3 

1 

6 
1 

2 
1 

4 
2 

1 


109 


Bertie 


Unattached 


42 
69 

1 
1 

17 
319 


4 
1 

1 

1 

1 
2 






41i 


Barton 








69 


Cody 


Unattached 






183 


Maisonville . . . 








1 


Bigwood 


Unattached 






17 


Burwash 








159 


Creighton 


X 






313J 
233 


Dennison 


<< 


323 

164 

1601 

160J 

341 


2 

1 
1 
1 
4 






Drury 


.. 


.... 




80 


Dryden 


<> 




Falconbridge . 


« 










Lome 


•< 






1 
3 

1 
1 

? 

4 

7 
10 


mi 

283J 


Louise 


« 








« 


248 


2 






154 J 


MacLennan . . . 


X 






35i 


Shakespeare . . 
Snider 


M 


iei 


1 






320J 
330 


« 






Wn tpr<? 


(< 


402 

1,452 
1,248J 

308 
l,0.83i 

665 
64 


3 

11 

11 

2 

7 
4 
4 






361 


Badgerow . . . 


Unattached 


1 


160J 


890 






1,480 




« 








Field 


i< 






6 
3 
3 

5 

1 


561 




1. 






460 




X 






41 


Jaff ray 

MoTavi'^h 


,, 






538 


,J 


160 
8 


1 

2 
2 

1 






160 


Townsites — 
Armstrong.. 


Unattached 














5 


1 


MnpParlanp 


.. 








Dryden 

Sioux Look- 


<• 






1 

1 
1 

8 


•i 

\ 

17 


jj 










Waldlmf 


<. 


17 

100 

1 

i 

19^ 

i 


1 

1 

1 
20 






Winnipeg 
River 
CrossinL . . 

Hearst . . . . 








23 


T. V. Anderson 

W. E. Whybourne, 








Hilton 






15 


161 









54 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 15. — Concluded. 


Townsites. 


District 

or 
County 


Agent. 


CO 

^_^ O 
O CO 

d 


1 


to . 
o « 


CO 
O CO 

. « 

O !-i 



P. 

et_, CD 

0.22 
d 


CO 

cS S3 

d a 


Capreol 


Sudbury .... 
Temiskaming. 

Muskoka 

Wellington. .. 

Grey 

Renfrew 

Victoria 

Frontenac . . . 

Lambton 

P^ssex 

York 

Renfrew 

Sinicoe 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Frontenac . . . 

Lennox and 
Addington . 

Simcoe 

Kenora 

Total 


Unattached 














Frederickhouse 




1 


5 






5 


1 .^A 


Iroquois Falls 


F. E. Ginn, Matheson . . 








Kirkland Lake 


Unattached 


1 


3 










Smyth 








3 
2 

10 


li 

Q 38 


MuskokaviHe . 


J.B. Brown, Bracebri'ge 
Unattached 


1 

h 
2 


1 

1 

1 

17 






Alma 






"100 
1 


Ayton 








3 83 


Petewawa .... 


Finlay Watt, Renfrew . 
Unattached 






Bobcaygeon . . . 






i 

•> 9 6 


City & Towns : 
Kingston . . . 


WATER LOT 
Unattached 


S. 

9 9 6 
^100 

100 


1 
1 






Sombra 










Ford City. . . 








1 
2 

2 

1 
1 


«S4 


Windsor 


„ 


2 
3 

2 

1 12 
-"^100 


1 
2 






2 


Keswick 


,, 






2 


Pembroke . . . 


,, 






1 2 


Belle Ewart 


,, 


1 






i 


Burgess — 
Whiskey Is'd 


ISLANDS. 
Unattached 






27 


Bastard — 
Kitchener Is- 
land 




5J 
2h 

/ 100 
1 


1 

1 

1 
2 

2 
1 






5i 
1 


Mink Island. 


(( 






Barrie — 
Pyne Island. 


jj 






Island in 
Shahbome- 
kah Lake. 








2 


Bedford- 
Bedford Is'd 


^j 








Ashby — 
Round Island 


(( 




Honeymoon 


(( 


6r> 


Island.... 








Matchedash — 
Island in Bur- 
rows Lake. 




1 


Malachi— 
Island G . . . 


jj 






1 ^ 


















49,864i 


414 


208 


30, 363 J 


566 


55,078il« 


Number 
Number 


of lots assignee 
of sales restore 


i 312 Numb 

d 19 Numbe 


iv of acres 
r of acres 


assij 
resto 


?ned 
red. 




i4,2C 

2,7C 


11 
31 



W. R. LEDGER, Sales Clerk. 

W. C. CAIN, Chief Clerk in Charge. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



Appendix No. 16. 

Statement of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st. 1919. 



Date of 
Instructions. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



Description of Survey. 



Amount 
m Paid 



No. in 
Acres 



Sept. 7, 1917. 

June 17, 1918. 

Apr. 20, 1918. 
May 20, 1918. 
June 14, 1918. 
June 26, 1918. 
Nov. 19, 1918. 

Apr. 15, 1919. 
9 May 16, 1919. 



A. L. Russell 



Phillips & Benner 



Apr. 15, 1919. 

Apr. 15, 1919. 
Apr. 15, 1919. 



H. J. Beatty 

David Beatty . . . 
E. R. Bingham... 

Lang & Ross 

Lincoln Mooney. . 

M. E. Crouch 

Lincoln Mooney.. 



Sutcliffe & Nee- 
lands 



T. J. Patten . . , 

Speight & Van 
Nostrand . . . . 



Survey of the shores of Lower She- 
bandowan Lake, District of Thun- 
der Bay 

Survey certain boundaries of the 
Black Sturgeon Pulp and Timber 
Limit, District of Thunder Bay. . 

Survey of certain township out- 
lines. District of Timiskaming. . 

Survey of the Township of William- 
son, District of Timiskaming. . . . 

Survey of certain base and meridian 
lines, District of Thunder Bay. . . 

Survey of the Township of Gum- 
ming, District of Algoma 

Survey of a line dividing the Town- 
ship of Wigle in the District of 
Sudbury into north and south 
halves 

To survey certain boundary lines 
of the Pic River Pulp and Timber 
Limit, District of Thunder Bay. . 

To survey timber limits in the 
Timagami Forest Reserve, east 
of the Township of Askin, Dis- 
trict of Nipissing 

To survey certain township outlines 
in the District of Timiskaming.. 

To survey a meridian line in the 
Districts of Kenora and Patricia. 

To survey certain township outlines 
on the Ground Hog River, Dis- 
tricts of Sudbury and Timis- 
kaming 

Scythes & Co., Ltd., iron posts.... 



$756 90 



1,766 75 


1,117 05 


3,062 25 


1,614 25 


3,548 10 


499 85 


8,605 68 



1,078 25 

7,618 23 
3,723 88 



5,697 75 
575 00 



51,878 



51,898 



39,663 94103,776 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



56 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appenflix No. 11. 
Statement of Surveys in progress during the twelve months ending October 31st, 1919. 



Date of • 
Instructions. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



Description of Surveys. 



Amount 
Paid 



Ulay 16, 1919. 

July' 8, 1919. 

Apr. 30, 1919. 

Apr. 15, 1919. 

Apr. 15, 1919. 

May 2, 1919. 

May 8, 1919. 

Apr. 22, 1919. 

Apr. 15, 1919. 

Apr. 15, 1919, 



Apr. 25, 1919. 
May 9, 1919. 



May 8, 1919. 



May 1, 

Aug. 6, 

Apr. 15, 

May 1, 

Sept. 30, 

Apr. 15, 

May 1, 

June 30, 



1919. 
1919. 
1919. 

1919. 
1919 

1919, 
1919. 
1919 



Apr. 15, 1919. 
July 22, 1919, 



E. R. Bingham. . . 
E. R. Bingham. . . 

David Beatty . . , 

H. J. Beatty 

A. S. Code 

T. G. Code 

S. B. Code 

Cavana & Watson 

Jas. S. Dobie 

J. W. Fitzgerald. 



C. E. Fitton . . 

D. J. Gillon . . . 



C. R. Kenny 

Lang & Ross . . . . 
J. L. Morris 



McAuslan & An- 
derson 



N. B. MacRostie. 
Phillips & Benner 

Phillips & Benner 
G. L. Ramsey. . . . 
A. L. Russell .... 

Wm. A. Sibbett.. 
G. L. Ramsey . . . 



Survey of part of the Township of Devon, 
District of Thunder Bay 

Survey outlines of certain townships west 
of the Townships of Marks and Conmee, 
District of Thunder Bay 

Traverse certain lakes in the Timagami 
Forest Reserve, Districts of Nipissing 
and Sudbury 

Survey certain township outlines, north of 
Lake Abitibi, District of Timiskaming. . 

Survey certain township outlines in the 
District of Algoma 

Traverse certain lakes and rivers in the 
Districts of Sudbury and Algoma 

Traverse the shores of Charleston Lake, 
Townships of Lansdowne and Escott, 
County of Leeds 

Survey certain township outlines. District 
of Sudbury 

Survey a meridian line between the Dis- 
tricts of Thunder Bay and Kenora 

Survey a meridian line in the vicinity of 
the Ground Hog River, and the residue 
of the Township of Nansen, District of 
Timiskaming 

To inspect Crown Surveys 

Survey a part of the boundary line between 
the Districts of Rainy River and Kenora, 
and certain meridian lines in Rainy 
River 

Traverse Missinaibi Lake and River and 
tributary waters. Districts of Algoma 
and Sudbury 

Survey certain township outlines. District 
of Algoma 

To re-establish part of the boundary of the 
Algonquin Provincial Park, District of 
Nipissing 

Survey certain townships in the District 
of Algoma 

Survey certain township outlines on the 
Kapuskasing River, District of Algoma. 

Survey a meridian line and that portion of 
Dog Lake lying north of the Township of 
Fowler, District of Thunder Bay 

To survey the Township of Fowler, in the 
District of Thunder Bay 

To survey certain base and meridian lines. 
District of Thunder Bay 

Traverse the shore of Upper Shebandowan 
Lake and Green Water Lake, District of 
Thunder Bay 

Survey the residue of the Townships of 
Casgrain and Hanlan, District of Algoma. 

Traverse Long Lake, District of Thunder 
Bay • 



$3,320 00 

2,700 00 

4,000 00 
5,650 00 
4,000 00 
3,440 00 

1,350 00 

3,200 00 

11,900 00 



4,550 00 
3,650 00 



4,900 00 



3,240 00 


5,700 00 


2,500 00 


5,312 50 


4,000 00 


500 00 


5,860 31 


4,586 50 


500 00 


2,500 00 


1,800 00 



89,159 31 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 57- 



Appendix No. 18. 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during the twelve months 

ending October 31st, 1919. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



No. 



Geo. L. Brown 



H. J. Beatty 



James A. 
& Son 



Bell 



720 



721 



722 



Date of 
Instructions. 



July 2, 1919, 



Aug. 26, 1919, 



Aug. 27, 1919. 



Description of Survey. 



To survey the road allowance between the 4th 
and 5th concessions of the Township of 
Williamsburg, across lots 10, 11 and 12, in 
said township, and that stone or other dur- 
able monuments be placed to mark the 
boundaries of the same. 

To survey the road allowance between the 9th 
and 10th concessions across lots 1, 2 and S 
in the Township of McNab, and that stone or 
other durable monuments De placed to mark 
the boundaries of such road allowance. 

To survey the boundary line between the 
Village of Port Stanley and the Township of 
Southwold, in the County of Elgin, and that 
stone or other durable monuments be placed 
marking such boundary and the intersections 
of the roads or streets running from the said 
village into said township. 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



Appendix No. 10. 

Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1919. 













Date when con- 












firmed under 




Name of 




Date of 




R. S. 0. 1914, 




Surveyor. 


No. 


Instructions. 


Description of Survey. 


Chapter 166, 
Sees. 10-15, In- 


^ 










clusive. 


1 


S. B. Code 


717 


June 4, 1918. 


To survey the road allowance 
between concessions 5 and 6, 
in the Township of Goulburn, 
across lots 16, 17 and 18, and 
that stone or other durable 
monuments be placed to mark 
the limits of the said road 
allowance 


Nov. 18, 1918. 



L. 



V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG. 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



58 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 20. 
SuiivEY OF Certain Township Outlines in the Districts of Sudbury and 

TiMISKAMING. 

Toronto, October 31st, 1919. 

Sir, — We have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
certain township outlines in the Districts of Sudbiiry and Timiskaming, made 
by us during the past summer, under instructions from your Department, dated 
.15th April, 1919. 

Upon receipt of the instructions, arrangements for the organization and 
equipment of the necessary party were begun, and, on the 15th of July, a party 
in charge of T. B. Speight, O.L.S., assisted by E. M. Anderson, O.L.S., was 
assembled at Kukatush on the Canadian National Eailways. The following day 
part of the supplies was taken from there some distance down the Ground Hog 
Eiver. Great difficulty was found, however, in obtaining sufficient men of the 
proper stamp for survey work, owing partly to the abundant opportunities for 
employment at points along the railways, and partly, to the high prices recently 
obtained for furs having rendered the Indians, who usually form a large proportion 
of the party, less inclined to supplement the proceeds of the hunt in this way. It 
was, therefore, the 18th of July before the survey was commenced, at the north- 
east corner of the Township of Muskego. The point of commencement had been 
reached the previous day by a good canoe route of about ten miles from the 
railway crossing at Winter Spawning Lake, a few miles west of the Ground Hog 
Eiver. We found the north-east corner of the Township of Muskego marked by 
an iron post planted beside a wooden post, both of which were marked " IX M " 
on the south side, and " Muskego " on the south-west side. From this point we 
ran due east, astronomically, delimiting the south boundaries of the Townships 
of Melrose and Frey. We intersected the west boundary of the Township of Keefer 
at chainage seven miles and 3.07 chains from the south-west corner of Frey. 
Wooden posts of the most durable material obtainable within reasonable distance 
were planted at the end of every mile on eacli of the boundaries run, and were 
marked on the west side with the distance from the south-west angle of the 
township. In addition, iron posts, li/4 inches in diameter were planted at the 
ends of the third and sixth miles in each case. Iron posts were also planted 
at the south-east corners of the townships, and both wooden and iron posts marked 
with the names of the adjoining townships. 

From the south-east corner of Melrose, we ran eight miles and 73.92 chains 
due north between the Townships of Melrose and Frey, to O.L.S. Niven's base 
line of 1899. Wooden posts were planted at every mile, and iron posts at the 
third and sixth miles. At the intersection of O.L.S. Niven's base line, a wooden 
post and an iron post 1% inches in diameter, both marked " Melrose " on the 
south-west, and " Frey " on the south-east, and " Eight miles and 73.92 chains " 
on the south side, were planted. 

We then proceeded west to the 45th mile of O.L.S. Niven's line, which we 
found defined by an iron post and a wooden post marked " XLV M " on the 
cast sides. We ran north, astronomically, from this point, three miles and 54.37 
chains to the south boundary of the Indian Eeserve surveyed by O.L.S. J. S. 
Dobie, in 1909. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 59 

]?eturning to the Ground Hog River, we proceeded down it to the north 
boundary of the Township of Straehan. O.L. Surveyors, Sutcliffe and Neelands 
had, earlier in the season, run this line from the north-west corner of the town- 
ship, as far as the west bank of the Ground Hog River, and planted a post on 
that bank at two miles and 62.69 chains. We continued the line east from this 
point to chainage eight miles and 78.12 chains, where we planted iron and wooden 
posts to mark the north-east corner of the township. From there we continued 
east, astronomically, along the south boundary of the Township of Fortune, eight 
miles and 66.35 chains to the west boundary of the Township of Cote. 

From the north-east corner of the Township of Straehan, we ran south, 
astronomically, one mile and 20.21 chains, to the north boundary of the Indian 
Reserve, which boundary we intersected at a point 6.98 chains east of post No. IV 
on that boundary. From the same corner we ran north, astronomically, nine 
miles along the east boundary of the Township of Montcalm to the north-east 
corner of that township. 

It became evident at this time that it would be impossible to complete 
the work described in your instructions this season, owing to the trouble we had 
experienced and were experiencing in obtaining and holding men, so it was decided 
not to attempt to complete the north boundary of Montcalm or the lines to the 
north at this time, beyond doing what work was possible from our camp at this 
corner. Accordingly, after running two miles to the north, and two miles to the 
west, we proceeded to run the north boundary of the Township of Fortune to the 
Township of Byers. The west boundary of Byers was reached at chainage eight 
miles and 63.71 chains. 

We returned to the railway via the Nat and Ground Hog Rivers, reaching 
the steel on the 16th of September. 

All east and west lines were run as chords of the parallels of latitude, passing 
through the corners of the respective townships. 

All lines were well opened up and properly blazed. Wherever possible, 
cairns of stone were built about the posts planted, and bearing trees, in each 
case, were carefully marked, with bearings and tlistances noted. Frequent astrono- 
mic observations were taken on Polaris throughout the survey. The notes of a 
number of these accompany the field notes. 

General Features. 

Practically all the area embraced by this survey lies in the valley of the 
Ground Hog River, and its tributary the Nat River. Generally speaking the 
country is rolling in the southern part, gradually becoming flatter to the north. 
Along the south boundaries of Melrose and Frey, the line crossed a succession 
of low to moderately abrupt sandy and gravelly ridges with a few outcrops of 
granite rock. Between Melrose and Frey, and north of O.L.S. Niven's base line, 
considerable stretches of flat land were crossed, varied in places by rock and gravel 
ridges. Few lakes were encountered, nor were any streams of any size crossed 
with the exception of the two rivers — the Ground Hog and the Nat. Large 
sections of the townships were burnt, apparently about twenty-five to thirty 
years ago, and more recent burns were crossed on the south boundary of Melrose, 
and on the south and west boundaries of Fortune. 



60 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Soil. 

No clay soil was found on the south boundaries of Melrose and Frey, but 
on the boundary between Melrose and Frey considerable stretches were crossed. 
This boundary lies between the Ground Hog and Nat Elvers, and the ground 
was, generally speaking, flat and wet, with clay and sand sub-soil alternating. 
The section north of O.L.S. Niven's base line showed about 30 per cent, clay 
soil, most of it light and intersected by sandy ridges. Much of the land was 
swampy, but there was comparatively little muskeg, the only large muskeg crossed 
being at the south-east corner of Poulett. 

Timber. 

Much of this area has been burnt over within the last twenty-fiye or thirty 
years, but some good stands of timber were noted. The best timber seen was 
along the south boundary of Melrose on both sides of the Nat Eiver, where there 
is a considerable area of exceptionally fine Banksian pine. In this area there 
are also some heavy stands of spruce of pulpwood size. Along the boundary 
between Melrose and Frey, the timber, mostly spruce, is generally light, with 
much balsam and undergrowth. Along the south boundary of Strachan; spruce, 
poplar, and birch, with occasional groves of Banksian pine, were found, and 
similar country was encountered as far as mile six of the south boundary of 
Fortune. Between miles six and seven there are some gravel ridges, which are 
heavily timbered with Banksian pine, birch, poplar, and scattered Norway pine. 
Bere was the only place we found Norway pine, and at no place did the lines 
pass through stands of white pine. From mile seven eastward the timber has been 
burnt off leaving sand hills almost bare except for small groves of spruce and 
cedar. 

Between Fortune and Parke there is a fair stand of spruce and Banksian 
pine, poplar, and birch, and the timber along the north boundary of Fortune is 
of the same general character. 

Wateb. 

The Ground Hog Eiver supplies a good canoe route from the railway as far 
north as the north limit of the Indian Eeserve. Several rapids and a fall of 
about fifteen feet are capable of supplying considerable power. From near the 
north limit of the. Indian Eeserve to well below the crossing of the north bouiulavy 
of Strachan lie what are known as the Six Mile Eapids, practically continuous 
swift water. 

The Nat Eiver between the south boundary of Melrose and the Indian 
Reserve, is a sluggish stream with, generally speaking, low marshy banks. Bromley 
Lake and a large marsh to the south form considerable storage basins. From 
the Indian Eeserve north, there are several rapids and small falls, but the river 
forms an excellent canoe route to the south boundary of the township of Aitken. 
The Nat may be reached from the Ground Hog Eiver by several portages, of 
which the best is about five miles south of the south limit of Melrose. 

Minerals. 

The rocks seen were mostly granite, and the area does not look promising 
from a mining standpoint. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 61 

Game. 

Moose were numerous, and signs of bear and wolves were noted at Yarious 
times. Beaver, too, were present in all streams. Pike and pickerel were plentiful 
in the Nat River, and sturgeon were found in the Ground Hog. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Speight & VanNo strand^ 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 21. 

Survey of Certain Township Outlines in the District of Algoma. 

North Bay, November 19th, 1919. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions from your Department dated April 
15th, 1919, we have surveyed certain township outlines in the District of Algoma, 
and beg to report thereon as follows: — 

Commencing our survey at the north-east corner of the Township of Coderre 
on June 1st, we ran north astronomically nine miles between the Townships of 
Mons and Champlain ; thence west astronomically to O.L.S. Speight's meridian 
line of 1910. Returning to our meridian, we proceeded across country to O.L.S. 
Speight's line of 1909, which had been run two miles between the Townships of 
Mons and Radisson. We produced this line west astronomically to intersect our 
meridian line. We then continued our meridian line north astronomically between 
the Townships of Ericson and Radisson and between Cromlech and Usnac, 
intersecting O.L.S. Speight's base line of 1910, forming the north boundary 
of Cromlech. From this point we ran the line between the Townships of 
ITsnac and Opazatika east astronomically, returning to our meridian we ran 
north astronomically between the Townships of Abbott and Opazatika. Return- 
ing to the south-west angle of Usnac, we ran west astronomically to the 
Missinaibi River between the Townships of Ericson and Cromlech and east astron- 
omically between the Townships of Usnac and Radisson to intersect O.L.S. 
Speight's meridian of 1909 forming the east boundary of Radisson; thence we 
ran north astronomically between the Townships of Usnac and Oscar and between 
Opazatika and Bourinot intersecting O.L.S. MacRostie's lines forming the north 
iiiui south boundaries of the township of Oscar and posting these intersections, 
returning via Opazatika Lake and portage to the Missinaibi River we picked up 
our line between Ericson and Cromlech and continued it west astronomically to 
O.Ti.S. Speight's meridian of 1910, thus completing the survey. 



62 REPORT OP THE No. 3 

A large portion, probably 40 per cent, of the eastern portion of the lands 
traversed by the survey, i.e., the Townships of Mons, Radisson, Usnac and Opaza- 
tika and the eastern part of the Townships of Champlain, Ericson, Cromlech and 
Abbott has been burned over within the last fifteen or twenty years and is covered 
with a very thick growth of small poplar and birch or spruce and jack pine and 
alder brush. With regard to the timber the balance of the land may be divided 
into two classes, i.e., the high land and the low land. The former being generally 
heavily timbered with white spruce, ranging from 5 in. to 24 in., birch, 5 in. to 
16 in., and balsam, 2 in. to 16 in., with an occasional ridge of jack pine, chiefly 
with black spruce 4 in. to 14 in., and in some places cedar 5 in. to 20' in. 

The lines dividing the Townships of Ericson, Champlain, Mons and Radisson 
indicate mostly sandy land with some areas of good clay land and occasionally 
a rock ridge. Generally speaking, the townships lying to the north of these 
are of good clay land, but slightly broken with rock ridges and swamps. Most 
of the swamps, however, could be drained and are of very fertile soil having from 
18 in. to 30 in. of moss and black muck with a clay subsoil. Judging by the 
numerous varieties of wild fruits which grow abundantly in this country, it ivS 
very suitable for agricultural purposes. 

No economic minerals were met with. The country rock is generally of a 
coarse-grained granite of the Laurentian Series, containing numerous veins of 
quartz and dykes of trap. 

There are no water powers of any importance in the territory embraced bv 
this survey, though the Missinaibi River throughout, has a very considerable fall. 

Accompanying this report are the usual return of field notes, etc., together 
with mounted plan and timber plan. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

We have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) MCx4usLAN & Anderson, 

Per H. M; Anderson. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 22.. 
Survey of Certain Township Outlines in the District or Timiskaming. 

Pembroke, December 12th, 1919. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
certain township outlines in the District of Timiskaming made by me under 
instructions from your Department, dated April 15th, 1919. 

On July 2nd, I left Pembroke with my party and proceeded via C. N. Railway 
and T. & N. 0. Railway to Cochrane, thence via C. N. Railway to Low Bush 
Station where I arrived on the 5th about eleven o'clock and proceeded up Low 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 63 

Bush Eiver that afternoon and camped at the north boundary of Bowyer Town- 
ship, about a mile and a quarter east of north-west corner of that township, that 
being the starting point of my first meridian, the survey of which was commenced 
on the morning of the 6th, and then run north a distance of fifteen miles in 
accordance with your instructions. At the sixth mile post I ran west along the 
north boundary of Findlay Township a distance of six miles, but owing to the 
north-east corner of the Township of Sweatman coming in open muskeg which 
has been frequently burned over, I was not able to locate it, and after searching 
for half a day, returned to the north-east corner of Findlay and ran east along 
north boundary of Henley Township. I then went down to the corner of Bowyer 
and Purvis Townships and ran north between Henley and Pliny intersecting my 
base line at five miles and seventy-eight chains and twenty-six links. I then 
continued east along north boundary of Pliny Township intersecting the west 
boundary of Steele Township one chain, thirty-seven and seven-tenth links south 
.of its north-west corner. 

I then packed my outfit across the north boundary to the north-east corner 
of the Township of Steele and ran the north boundary of the Township of Scapa, 
a distance of six miles, then went south to north-east corner of Bonis Township 
and ran the east boundary of Scapa north, intersecting my base line at five mile, 
seventy-eight chains and ten links, I then continued my base line, and established 
the corner of Abbotsford and Adair Townships at a distance of nine miles from 
north-east corner of Steele, from here I ran the line forming boundary between 
Abbotsford and Adair Townships north a distance of nine miles, and returning 
south to my base line I continued east intersecting the Quebec boundary at a 
point thirty-six chains and eighteen links north of the one hundred and third 
mile post. I ran the meridian forming west boundary of Abbotsford Township 
north from the north-east corner of Steele, a distance of nine miles and then 
turned east along north boundary of Abbotsford and at chainage eight miles plus 
seventy-nine chains and five links, I intersected the east boundary at seventy-nine 
diains and three links north of the eight-mile post. I then continued along 
north boundary of Adair Township intersecting the Quebec boundary at a point 
thirty-six chains and forty-five links north of mile post one hundred and twelve, 
I then packed down the Interprovincial boundary to my southerly base line 
which I followed west to the old portage on which I went south to the Okikodasik 
liiver where I had sent my canoes. We came down this river to La Peine Station 
on the Canadian National Railway. 

Meridian lines were all run north astronomically and base lines east or west 
on chords of latitude. Wooden posts of the most durable material available, 
properly marked, were firmly planted at intervals of one mile with iron posts 
alongside, where shown on plan and in field notes, two bearing trees for each 
post were taken where available and stones were placed alongside posts when they 
were procurable within a reasonable distance. 

All lines were well opened and properly blazed. Frequent observations for 
azimuth were taken, a number of which are recorded in the field notes, but owing 
to the magnetic needle on my transit being out of order, I have not obtained 
the magnetic variation. 

The area embraced by this survey has a total depth of eighteen miles north 
and south and a })readth of forty and one-half miles east and west. 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Soil. 

Along the base and meridian lines run by me forming boundaries of Findlay, 
Henley and Pliny Townships, the soil is practically all clay with comparatively 
small swampy areas covered by deep moss, and the land is suitable for agricul- 
tural purposes, this also holds true with reference to my first meridian for a 
distance of about four miles north of my first base line. The remainder of this 
meridian is not good land, and on the northerly two miles the soil is mostly 
sandy with occasional granite outcrops. 

Along the base and meridian lines forming boundaries of Scapa, Abbotsford 
and Adair Townships I do not consider the land suitable for agricultural purposes, 
about fifty per cent, being sandy soil and of the balance a considerable percentage 
is swampy. 

Timber. 

The timber throughout is principally spruce from four to eight inches in 
diameter with scattered areas of spruce, jack pine and poplar from' six to ten 
inches in diameter, a fairly dense growth of underbrush covers the country 
generally. 

A small area of Jack pine up to fifteen inches in diameter is situated in 
the south-west corner of Abbotsford Township. 

Old brule was found on the sixth mile of the north boundary of Findlay 
Township, on the second, third and fourth miles of the west boundary of Abbots- 
ford Township and along the easterly three miles of the south boundary of 
Adair Township. 

Fresh brule of 1919 origin was encountered on northerly thirty chains of 
my first meridian, the southerly limit of this fire apparently extended in a southr 
easterly direction for a distance of about two miles, that being as far as we 
could see from the high ground just west of the north end of this meridian. I 
can give no estimate of the distance it extended to the west. Fire also ran through 
the south-east corner of Adair Township this season, crossing south boundary 
just east of five mile post and extends southwesterly about two miles, Avhile in a 
northeasterly direction it extended to Joe Lake, crossing Interprovincial boundary 
about mileage one hundred and seven. 

On August 22nd, we saw smoke rising about three miles to the north of 
fifth mile post on north boundary of Adair Township. 

Minerals. 

No indications of economic minerals were noted. 

Streams and Lakes. 

Low Bush River is navigable by canoes from station of that name on Canadian 
National Railway to where it crosses north boundary of Findlay Township, there 
being three short portages in Boyer Township and one in Henley. Circle River 
is also navigable by canoes from Low Bush Station, the first portage being about 
a half mile south of north boundary of Pliny Township and I understand there 
is a long portage commencing about thirty chains north of this boundary. I 
understand that Mud River which runs along west boundary of Abbotsford is 
occasionally used as a canoe route but we did not use canoes there. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 65 

Patten or Woman Eiver flowing through Township of Adair is a stream 
of considerable size, has its source in Province of .Quebec and flows through Joe 
Lake near south-east corner of Adair Township, thence in a north-westerly direc- 
tion crossing the north boundary of that township about one mile east of the 
north-west corner, where it is between three and four chains wide, but we did 
not use it as a canoe route. From Joe Lake there are two portages south to the 
Okikodasik Eiver. The one crossing the south boundary of Adair near the five 
mile post is the shorter and is used by the Indians in high water, this portage 
is very wet and swampy; the other is the older and longer portage and crosses 
a high granite ridge and strikes the river about two miles lower down. The 
Okikodasik Eiver is navigable by canoes from both of these portages to La Eeine 
Station on the Canadian National Eailway, there being five or six portages 
varying from five chains to thirty-five chains in length. 

There are no water powers capable of development. 

Game. 

Game was very scarce, only a few moose being seen during the season, and 
only occasionally evidence of beaver noticed. 

Generally speaking, the Townships of Findlay, Henley and Pliny appear 
to be suitable for agricultural purposes, with a fair amount of timber suitable 
for pulpwood. I do not consider the Townships of Scapa, Abbotsford or Adair 
suitable for agricultural purposes, but there is considerable timber of pulpwood 
size throughout these townships, but the streams practically all flow north. 

Accompanying this report are a plan and field notes of the entire survey, with 
accounts in triplicate, and the customary affidavits. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

YouT obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Herbert J. Beatty, 

Ontario Land Surve3-ov. 

The Jlonourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 23. 

TUAVERSE OF THE SHORES OF CHARLESTON AND EeD HoRSE LaKES AND OF THE 

Islands Therein. 

Smith's Falls, November 10th, 1919. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions dated the 8th day of May, 1919, 
to make a traverse of the shores of Charleston Lake and Eed Horse Lake and 
of the islands in each, I have the honour to transmit herewith my report, plan 
on linen on a scale of 20 chains to the inch, field notes and affidavits, etc., in 
<'onnection therewith. 

5 F.M. 



66 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

After a few preliminaries, I commenced my survey of the traverse of tlu 
shore of Charleston Lake on the 3rd day of June, from an iron pin planted on 
Slack's Point, near the intersection of the 11th concession line with the shore. 
.1 ran easterly and southerly from this point to the outlet reach, and then came 
back and continued the traverse westerly and southerly to this same reach. 

On the opposite shore from the iron pin at the outlet four feet above, which 
marks the height to which the Gananoque Water Power Company may hold the 
water in the lake, I established a bench mark, a cross in the rock, Station 123 
of my traverse, which is seven feet and three inches above the iron pin. 

The Power Company are entitled to keep the water four feet above the 
iron pin. 

The astronomic bearing and distance of this bench mark from the iron 
pin is north 57 degrees 49 minutes east 73 feet. 

On August 19th, I ran a line of levels from the shore of Donaldson's Bay 
in Charleston Lake, to the easterly shore of Eed Horse Lake, following along the 
portage, and found the elevation of the water surface in Eed Horse Lake to be 
3. 69 feet lower than the surface of the water in Charleston Lake. 

1 fixed a bench mark on a maple tree near the shore of Eed Horse Lake, as 
shown by the notes, and also one on the rock surface, Station H, eight feet 
westerly therefrom. 

As shown by the attached index there are 133 islands in Charleston Lake 
and ten islands in Bed Horse Lake. 

Most of the desirable islands in both lakes appear to be claimed by some 
person or other. The information furnished me on the ground was to the effect 
that Mr. Joe Banta, a wealthy American, owns several islands including Sheep 
Island, on which he has his summer home. I was unable to locate Sheep Island 
on the plan furnished me by the Surveys Branch, but concluded that the small 
one directly south of Orange Island must be intended for it. This is probably 
the most valuable island in the lake from the viewpoint of location, trees and 
timber, and general appearance. It was formerly the property of the late Walter 
Beatty, O.L.S. Mr. W. Parish, of Athens, is also the owner of several islands. He 
lias his summer home 'on Little Bluff. Eabbit Island is partly cleared and 
cultivated, and the remainder is covered with second growth pines and other 
small timber. William Crozer appears to have squatted upon this island some 
years ago, cleared up part of the island, built a house and barns upon it, cultivated 
the cleared portion, and raised his family there. 

I have divided the lower or southerly end of what was known as Democrat 
Island into two new numbered islands, viz., 11 and 12. 

There was a separation by water from the mainland at the places shown 
on the plan to justify making separate islands of these two. J. Mulvenna, of 
Athens, has a cottage on the southerly end of No. 11. 

I cannot find any islands in the lake to correspond with what is marked 
on the Department's plan as " Hobson's Choice." There are only five small 
islands in this locality; three of these, viz., Grape and Twin Islands are owned 
by Norman Dowsley, and "Heart's Delight " and "Happy Thought" by John 
E. Wemple. Bear Island near these is owned by E. Donovan, M.P.P. 

As will be noticed by the plan the sideline between Lots 15 and 16 inter- 
sects the 10th Concession on the westerly shore of the lake. 

I have renewed the high water mark cut on the rocky shore between Charleston 
and the Townline Eoad Allowance between Escott and Lansdowne, by Willi? 
Chipman, C.E., some years ago. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OP LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 67 

I placed a water gauge on the wharf on Bertha Island at the commencement 
of my work, and from then, that is about the first of June until the 4th of 
September, the water had fallen by 2i/^ feet. 

I have shown the principal shoals by a small cross for each on the plan. 

1 am also enclosing with my field notes and report, my diary, as directed 
in your instructions. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) S. B. Code, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 2Jf. 



SuiivEY OF Windy Lake, in the Townships of Dowling and Cascaden, 

District of Sudbury. 

North Bay, May 27th, 1919. 

Sir, — The survey of Windy Lake in the Townships of Dowling and Cascaden, 
performed under instructions from your Department of February 21st last, has 
been finished and we are sending you herewith our plan of the same and our 
report. 

Governed by those instructions we ran a close inshore traverse of the lake, 
carrying continuous azimuth and station to station chainage. 

The original survey lines were picked up at their shore intersections and 
marked at these points by iron posts, on which posts were carved the distinguish- 
ing lot and concession numbers. Certain other prominent points on the • shore 
line were also marked by iron posts and these posts were consecutively marked 
"LP.l," ''I.P.2," etc. 

No trace of the original line between Lots 2 and 3, Concession IV, Cascaden, 
could be found except on Green Island and at the mainland immediately north 
and south of it. 

Islands were also tied into the traverse, and on each island a squared tree 
or stump was likewise marked " P.P." with a designating number. 

The contact line between the Laurentian and the nickle eruptive series was 
delineated across the ice and for a distance of 10 chains on each side thereof 
soundings were taken at five chain intervals, while throughout the rest of the 
lake similar soundings were taken at ten chain intervals, east and west, by twenty 
chains north and south. 

No traverse was made of the C.P.P. track, but a copy was made of the 
revised plan from the company's own survey and this is included in our returns. 
The track was tied in to our traverse at one point. 

The level of the lake as at March 27th, 1919, stood at 1.10G.7 feet above 
mean sea level, deduced from C.P.P. base of rail at Windy Lake Station, there 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

being no other available bench, mark from their records. This base of rail eleva- 
tion 1,233-0 is recorded in " Canadian Altitudes " last edition. 

A profile of the soundings is also included showing the depths of these 
souiidings except those along the contact line, and indicated from vk^est to east 
by consecutive numbers and each line is indicated alphabetically from north 
to south. 

An imaginary base line was run from point number 3 on the traverse south 
astronomically and the numbers are indicated by a plus sign if to the east of 
that line and by a minus sign if to the west. 

Field notes are included showing the length and azimuth of each course, the 
stations being numbered consecutively from 1 up. Shore offsets are shown together 
^yit^l ties to all the iron reference points. 

We trust all returns may be found in order. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

'. Your obedient servants, 
i 

' (Sgd.) McAusLAN & Anderson, 
' Per H. M. Anderson. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto,. Ontario. 



Appendix No. 25. 
Survey of Lower and Middle Shebandowan Lakes. 

Port Arthur, March 22nd, 1919. 

Sir, — I beg to report as follows on the survey of Lower and Middle She- 
bandowan Lake undertaken in accordance with your instructions of September, 
1917, for the purpose of ascertaining the area of the lake, the contour of the 
shore line and islands therein. 

As previously reported the very early advent of winter and unusually stormy 
and wet weather rendered it impossible for me to continue the field work without 
serious loss and impairment of efficiency. Micrometer work was consequently 
abandoned, as approved by your Department, and survey resumed with stadia 
measurements in the following spring on the ice. 

As you will notice by the field notes every detail in the shore line has been 
carefully outlined — the number of measurements being in excess of the actual 
requirement of the instructions. The chief difficulty lay in tracing out the lines 
and posts of the old Mining Location Surveys, an especially difficult matter when 
the snow is deep. Many could not be found. Their proper position on the map 
can, however, be readily approximated by the interaccordance of the two outline 
surveys. Hereafter an explorer or prospector will find no trouble, by means of 
this map, in locating his find so that the area intended will be distinctly evident 
and the work of the Department likewise greatly lightened. Delay in making 
out the more than usually intricate set of field notes and plan occurred by my 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 69 

appointment as Registrar for this District under the " Canada Registration " Act, 
also as supervisor for the subsequent " Resources Committee " work. The urgency 
of " winning the war " tempted me to undertake these responsibilities. The 
loyalty of this District becomes conspicuous when I state that, with the exception 
of only three specially avidious workers, the numerous deputies and other officials 
volunteered their services free of cost. Another unfortunate delay was caused by 
the accidental omission by one of my assistants to record one of the larger (5 
chain) stadia rod divisions, causing a break in the survey, which was not found 
out and corrected until much time and labour had been expended. 

I discovered amongst the effects of the late S. J. Dawson, C.E., of Dawson 
Route fame — a large (800 foot to an inch) plan of Shebandowan Lake, being a 
trigonometrical survey made by the then (1869) Department of Public Works 
of Canada. This plan is very unsatisfactory and highly erroneous in many places 
but the long distance trig, measurements afford a good check on the stadia and 
micrometer survey. The extremes in sixteen miles apparently coincide very closely 
with my plotting, as you will observe on comparing the reduction to 20 chains 
to an inch, which I made and forwarded with my original plan — the original is 
available if desired. 

As over sixty-two (62) islands, many very small, had to be surveyed and 
tie lines run to them, the work occupied more time, both in the field and office 
than was anticipated. 

The total mileage of shore line of main land was: — 

Mainland 68.30 miles 

Islands (shoreline only) 14,17 " 

Total 82.47 " 

The results of observations and stadia and micrometer comparisons are 
shown at various intervals in the field notes. There is a small dam at the outlet 
of Shebandowan Lake to assist in lumbering operations. Its height is necessarily 
limited — a further increase would endanger the National (C,N,0,R.) Railway 
roadbed besides affecting mining and summer resort properties. In future patents 
it might possibly be well to guard against any claims which might arise from a 
f^light increase in level for hydro-electric storage purposes, 

I have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Alex, L, Russell, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The llotioiirnhle, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



70 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 26. 

Sdkvey op Base and Meridian Lines in the Distkiot of Thunder Bay, 

Fort William, Ont._, January 23rd, 1919. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the followmg report on the survey of 
base and meridian lines in the District of Thunder Bay, carried out under your 
instructions dated the 14th of June, 1918. 

Before the receipt of my instructions I was notified that this was to be a 
cruising proposition as well as a survey, and was instructed to find a cruiser. 
I spent at least two weeks endeavouring to secure a satisfactory man for the 
work. I hired two men for this purpose, but both cancelled the arrangements 
made, one two days before the date set for leaving, after shipping arrangements 
and connections for the men had been made. In this awkward situation I was 
fortunate in engaging at the last moment so desirable a man as Mr. Ben Howson 
for the work. 

Immediately after receipt of my instructions I proceeded to Whitefish Lake 
with a small party, located my starting point, took an observation for azimuth 
and carried the line across Whitefish Lake. It will be noted that the line strikes 
at the mouth of Sucker Creek, which flows in from the west, and not on the 
headland as shown on the compiled plan accompanying the instructions. Several 
of the lines strike points considerably different and at different distances from 
those shown on this plan, particularly on the boundary waters. 

Eeturning to the city I completed the organization and equipment of my 
party, and proceeding once more to Whitefish, had my party and outfit taken 
down the lake to a point convenient to Sucker Creek. From this point the line 
was carried south in accordance with the instructions. 

The country was so mountainous, however, that it was impossible to move 
the whole outfit along the line, particularly with the men available, and I made 
arrangements to have the outfit and party moved back up the lake to the Old 
Pigeon River Lumber Company's tote road. A raft was built and horses brought 
across the lake, and a waggon hauled through the water close to shore from a 
point some two or three miles above the road. The whole party was then set to 
brushing out the road, laying corduroy, re-building bridges, etc., and the outfit 
was hauled to old Pigeon Eiver Company's Camp 3, where we camped for some 
days. 

The line work was then proceeded with according to instructions, but through- 
out the first half of the survey the country was so rough that nearly all moving 
was done along the old trails which I opened up, in many instances at considerable 
distances from the work, involving long walks and lost time and slow progress. 

Labour conditions were such, both as to the securing of men and getting 
them to camrp — owing to the phenomenal wages then being paid in Fort William 
on war work being done on a percentage basis, and which eventually proved a 
disturbing factor in labour conditions from" coast to coast — and the keeping up 
of camp supplies in the rough country with the shortage of men who could pack 
anything was becoming such a seriou.; problem, that I engaged the services of 
Mr. John Shaw, O.L.S., to assist me in the work, when about half was completed. 

From this time I devoted myself more particularly to securing bushmen and 
tlie forwarding of supplies, but even so, only for a very short time were there 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 71 

enough men available to run double party. 

The weather throughout was exceptionally fine, and was possibly responsible 
for the comparative absence of fly pests. On the other hand, in a rocky, hilly 
country, continued dry weather made the water problem serious, and it became 
necessary to procure closed vessels to carry water along the line for use during 
the day and at meal time. 

Before commencing the work the chainmen were well posted in their work, 
but frequent change of the front chainman after the original man gave out 
through exhaustion made constant watchfulness and checking necessary. 

The lines will be found to be well opened, well blazed, and with large well 
marked posts planted throughout, and bearing-trees well chosen and marked 
where such were at all available. 

All points required by the instructions were marked by iron posts, except 
at Mountain Lake. A raft broke up on the Arrow River, and this post with other 
things was lost. At this point, however, I personally constructed a stone cairn 
almost as high as the post, and in a well protected position. 

The traverse of the part of the south shore of Whitefish Lake was left by 
arrangement to be done on the ice. An attempt was made to carry out this work 
during the week before Christmas, but owing to the peculiar winter weather, 
including heavy rain, this had to be abandoned, and this work was only recently 
completed. 

Watch was kept for signs of old survey lines throughout the progress of the 
work, but at only one point were lines and post found. Connection was made, 
however, at the termination of all lines where such existed with international 
or township boundaries. 

Observations for azimuth were taken at least once on each line. Observations 
on tlie sun for time were frequently taken. 

Soil. 

All lands of an agricultural nature are shown on the plan of survey coloured 
brown. These areas are carefully plotted not only from the field notes of survey, 
but from the observations made by the cruiser. The greater part of the lands 
passed through or cruised are totally unfit for agriculture, being mostly rock, 
sometimes bare, but usually with a shallow covering of leafy loam. 

The agricultural land referred to consists mostly of clay, white to light 
brown in colour, and clay loam. Except in some wet areas there is not heavy 
moss. As the hills are approached stones and boulders are met in increasing 
quantities. Frequently in the larger clay area patches were seen several acres in 
extent where fires had removed most of the timber, and very little clearing was 
necessary before ploughing could be done. 

In some of these patches and along the old tote roads clover and timothy 
grew spendidly. 

Minerals. 

The rpck throughout the greater part of this country is granite, hornblendic 
rocks being found in the south, while east of South Fowl Lake there is consider- 
able showing of low grade iron. The variation of the compass going round the 
sharp point on the south shore of Whitefish Lake near its east end, differences 
of 25 deg. being noted in going half a mile round the point, would indicate 
bodies of iron ore. 



72 - - EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

TiMBEB. 

This whole country has been lumbered over at a comparatively recent date. 
Nearly all of it shows signs of having been burnt over at some period. There 
is practically no valuable timber apart from what is now being taken out im- 
mediately south of Whitefish Lake. There are odd clumps of trees to be met 
with, at one or two points considerable parcels of white pine, as on the range 
of hills south of the first mile of the line running west to South Fowl Lake, but 
these are usually so situated as to make their removal a losing proposition, though 
ill the future, settlers may find it worth while to ^iut and remove for their 
own use. 

The country is covered principally by small birch and poplar. On the first 
meridian immediately south of the Arrow Eiver is a small area of spruce thai 
would make pulpwood were it more accessible and of a larger area. 

Game. 

There was seen but little trace of the small fur-bearing animals, mink, 
marten,, etc., but bears are very plentiful, as are moose ; there were some red 
deer seen. Beaver are the principal occupants of the region, in fact, not a member 
of the party had seen them so plentiful elsewhere. At nearly every point where 
there was enough water available beaver dams were to be seen; at times several, 
one above the other, on the same stream. There are beaver houses along the Arrow 
Eiver. In fact, the one thing the westerly part of the territory is suitable for 
is a game preserve. 

There are numerous trails throughout the country covered, opened up origin- 
ally by the various lumber companies who have operated here. Most of these 
have grown up considerably with brush, and are obstructed by fallen logs, but 
should it be decided to lay out the agricultural area for settlement a little atten- 
tion would make these available for the first needs of the settler, the South Fowl 
Lake Eoad and the road north of the Arrow Eiver as far as the dam in particular, 
requiring little to make them at least travelable; in fact, they were both travelled 
this last summer, but would be better for some attention in the wet spots. 

The " Hospital " bridge, over which the former road crosses the Arrow 
Eiver, is still in fair condition, and well worth taking care of. 

1 am forwarding herewith field notes of survey and lake traverse, plan of 
survey, plans of traverses, timber plan, affidavits, etc., and trust that everything 
upon inspection will be found satisfactory. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) E. E. Bingham, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 73 

Appendix No. 27. 
Survey of a Meridian Line in the District of Kenora. 

Little Current, Ont., October 1st, 1919. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the following report on the survey 
of a meridian line in the District of Kenora under instructions from your Depart- 
ment dated Toronto, April 15th, 1919. 

I commenced the work on the 12th of June at the iron posts at the north- 
west angle of the Township of Rowell, as directed, with a party of 18, composed 
of 9 from this vicinity and 9 from the Lac Seul country. My intention was 
to add to the party, Indians, as guides and canoemen, after crossing Lac Seul, 
and for which I had arranged with the Hudson's Bay Co. 

Owing to the Winnipeg strike which interrupted seriously the transportation 
of supplies on the Canadian Government Railways, I was unable to proceed 
earlier with the work. - 

The line was continued to the north shore of Lac Seul, a distance of 33 miles 
and 5 chains, which point was reached about the 10th of July. Here the Indian 
packers from the Lac Seul country refused to proceed any further — three of them 
had deserted some miles back — and of the canoemen and guides arranged for only 
three arrived. They also intimated that they could remain only a few weeks. 
An effort was then made to obtain more help at the Lac Seul and Pine Ridge 
posts, but hardly any good men appeared to be available. Finding, therefore, 
that I would probably not be able to proceed much farther this season, and 
being much broken in health, I concluded to discontinue the work for the time. 

At the end of each mile a wooden post 6 inches square, of the most durable 
wood convenient was planted and marked on the south side the number of miles, 
as 1 M., etc., from the initial point. In addition to this at the end of every 
third mile an iron post li/4 inches in diameter was planted beside the wooden 
one and similarly marked. Where a mile came in a lake a post was planted on 
the nearest shore and the miles and chains marked on it. Two bearing trees 
were also marked at every post, all of which was duly entered in the field notes. 

The line was well blazed in the usual way — a blaze on the side of the tree 
facing the line and on the north and south sides of it. 

Frequent observations of Polaris were made to check the bearing of the line 
which was projected north astronomically. 

The first mile is mostly large timber, the swamp areas containing m*uch black 
spruce and some cedar, and the higher ground jack pine, poplar and balsam. 

From the 2nd to the 16th miles the country is principally brule, on the 
high land, with a growth of jack pine, birch, spruce, balsam and poplar about 
3 inches in diameter. In the lower tracts which escaped the fire there is consider- 
able black spruce up to 12 inches in diameter. Between Ord and Miller Lakes, 
in the 6th mile, there is big green timber. From the 16th mile to the end of 
the work it is mostly big timber of the same kind and quality. In many places 
there is some good cedar. 

The entire country traversed appears to be red granite and destitute of 
mineral. 

Rocky ridges with sand, boulders and gravel interlying are the main features 
up to the 17th mile where the south cove of Lac Seul was intersected. From 

6 F.M. 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

the 17th mile to the end of the line there is cpnsiderable clay land and probably 
a sufficient area of it might be found fit for farming settlements. 

I enjoined on every member of my party the necessity of great care being 
exercised in order to prevent fire. 

Moose and deer abound, also the smaller game, and fish. 

I have the honour to be. Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) T. J. Patten, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Tlie Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 28. 

Survey of the Black Stuegeon River Pulp and Timber Limit, in the 
District of Thunder Bay. 

Port Arthur, Ont., December 9th, 1919. 

Sir, — "We beg to report that in accordance with your instructions dated 
June 21st, 1918, we have completed the survey of the south boundary, west 
boundary and part of the north boundary of the Black Sturgeon River Pulp 
and Timber Limit. 

This survey was commenced from the north-west angle of the Township of 
Hele, where an iron post 1% in. in diameter and a cedar post were planted by 
M, E. Crouch, O.L.S., in 1916. From this point the south boundary was run 
west astronomically a distance of thirty miles, fifty-one chains and twenty-one 
links to the south-west angle of the limit. This line was run in chords of six 
miles, with reference to a meridian through their central points, the deflections 
being made at the 7th, 13th, 19th and 25th miles. The west boundary was run 
north astronomically, from the south-west angle, a distance of twenty-eight miles 
to the north-west angle of the limit. From the north-west angle the north boundary 
was run east astronomically a distance of twenty-one miles, eleven chains and forty 
links to intersect the high water line of Mclntyre Bay of Lake Nipigon. This 
boundary was run in chords of six miles with reference to a meridian through 
their central points, the deflections being made at the 6th, 12th, and 18th miles. 
A careful stadia traverse was made of the shore line of Mclntyre Bay from the 
point where our line intersected it to the west boundary of the Township of Innes. 
Frequent astronomical observations were taken to verify the accuracy of the 
direction of the line. 

Wooden posts were planted according to instructions, the first post on the 
south boundary being planted at chainage fifty-one chains and twenty-one links 
and this chainage was marked on the post. Thereafter posts were planted at 
intervals of one mile, the next post being marked " 2M " and so on to the 31 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 75 

mile post. The posts on the west boundary were marked from 1 to 28 from 
.son til to north and on the north boundary from 1 to 21 from west to east, the 
liiial post being marked " 21M 10' chains " and being planted at the chainage. 
Iron posts li/4 in. in diameter were planted at intervals of three miles from east 
to west on the south boundary, from south to north on the west boundary and 
from west to east on the north boundary. Iron posts 1% in. in diameter were 
planted at the south-west and north-west angles of the limit and a chainage 
21M 10 chains on the north boundary. These posts were all marked with the 
mileage at which they were planted. 

The ends of the 21st and 29th miles on the south boundary and the 13th 
on the west boundary came in places where it was impossible to plant posts. The 
first two being in lakes, the posts were planted on the nearest shores. In the third 
instance the mile point came on top of a large boulder and the post was moved 
forward. These posts were marked with the chainage at which they were planted. 

Survey Lines. 

The only line established by an Ontario Land Surveyor encountered was a 
meridian run by A. H. Macdougall, in 1903. This was intersected by our south 
boundary at chainage 6M 51.805 and the distance to the nearest mile post was 
ten chains and thirteen links to the south, the post being marked " XIV M.'"' 
This line was also found at its intersection with Mclntyre Bay, or the closing 
point of our survey. 

Other lines found were numerous trial lines surveyed by the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company, about eight years ago, in an endeavour to locate suitable 
grades for a railway from Nipigon to Savanne. The direction of these lines 
was not noted but the chainage of those intersecting our lines are indicated in 
the field notes. 

Topography. 

The region in the vicinity of the Black Sturgeon River is very rough, the 
river valley being about four hundred feet deep with summits from twenty chains 
to three miles inland. For two miles after crossing Sucker Creek the land is. 
fairly level and from here west to the Spruce River is a very rough broken 
'^ountry with hills from fifty to three hundred feet high. The land along the 
west boundary is not rough but has a continual slope to the north. There Avould 
be a drop of about six hundred feet in this line. On the north boundary from 
the Poshkokagan River to the north-west corner of the limit there is a slope to 
the east. East of the Poshkokagan River to the portage from Lake Nipigon to 
Black Sturgeon Lake is fairly level and from the portage east to the twenty 
mile post is a high rocky country the slope being to the south. East of the 
twenty mile post is nearly level. 

Soil. 

On the south boundary the best soil found was from about the 3rd mile 
post to the 6th mile post. This graded from sandy loam at the cast to a red 
clay loam on the west. The subsoil is clay. West of here to the Spruce River 
the country was nearly all rocky and the soil either light or very stony. West 
of the river good land was again found. This area extended from the 25th 
mile to the 28th and is nearly all a sandy loam. On the west boundary good 



76 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

soil was found along the greater part of the line. The best areas are from the 
corner to the 10th mile post and from the 17th mile to the north-west corner 
and of these areas the first mentioned is probably the better since in the latter 
there is a considerable area of swamp land. Between the 10th and 17th miles 
the soil, though good in places is mostly rocky. On the north boundary good 
land was found from the north-west corner to the eleventh mile and east of 
this to the 20th mile is mostly all rocky. The remaining part is fairly good 
though rather stony. 

EocK Formation. 

The predominant formation is diabase. Intrusions of the red stones of the 
Nipigon Formation were observed in places. Banded granite was found in the 
hills east of the Spruce Eiver. No minerals of economic value were found. 

Timber. 

The country within the limit is nearly all well timbered, the only burned 
over area observed being between the 11th and 15th miles on the north boundary. 
This was burned in 1917 and nearly all the timber was destroyed. A fire of 
considerable extent has passed over portions of the limit about forty years ago. 
The second growth timber on these portions extend from the 19th mile to the 
26th mile on the south boundary, from the 11th mile to the 21st mile on the 
west boundary (areas of large timber intruding in places here), and from the 
10th mile to the end of the line on the north boundary. In these areas the 
young growth on the higher lands is mostly birch, spruce, jack pine and poplar, 
the amount of each being in the order mentioned. On the low land the pre- 
dominant species is spruce. The average size of the timber would be about four 
inches. The remaining portions of the line are well timbered with spruce, birch, 
poplar and jack pine with considerable balsam. The average size would be between 
seven and ten inches. The spruce is the species occurring most often in the 
blocks of any value. The largest areas of this species on the south boundary 
are between the 3rd mile and the 6th mile and between the 26th mile and the 
south- we^t corner. Here the timber is very suitable for pulpwood on the lower 
land and on the high land for logs and piling. On the west boundary good 
spruce is found from the south-west corner to the 11th mile. This is larger 
than that on the south boundary but there is a considerable amount of it blown 
down by wind. From the 21st mile to the northwest corner is a better stand, 
this area containing many swamps where spruce is the only species found. On 
the north boundary it extends from the north-west corner to about the 10th mile 
and here the best spruce was found. There appeared to be a very large area 
of spruce swamps to the north of the line here and also extending to the west 
for several miles. Two areas of jack pine were noticed, the first being from 
the 5th mile to midway between the 6th and 7th miles on the south boundary 
and the second along the 17th mile on the west boundary. No white pine of 
value was seen. 

EouTEs, Waterways, etc. 

The main rivers draining the Limit are the Black Sturgeon, Nonwatin, 
Spruce and Poshkokagan. The Black Sturgeon is the outlet of the Nonwatin 
and Spruce and is the most important one. It is navigable by canoe at all 
seasons and would require very little improvement for driving timber. The 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 77 

Spruce is very shallow and can be used to advantage for canoeing only in the 
early summer months. It was necessary for us to use it, however, and from 
Little Sturgeon Lake to the south boundary of the limit between twenty and 
thirty portages were cut out. The Spruce is joined by a smaller stream, the 
Eaglehead River about eight miles from the south boundary. The Poshkokagan 
River appears to have a greater flow than the Spruce. It was only used from 
Chief Bay to the north boundary of the limit (about ten miles) and in this 
distance there are only two portages and both are short. The portages further 
up the river are well cut out and are used by Indians in the spring. 

Black Sturgeon Lake was made the supply base for the performance of the 
survey. Supplies were brought here via Lake Nipigon and were cached with 
the forest rangers. The mam party was taken in via Black Sturgeon River and 
the first meet with the packers made at the Spruce River. 

Water. 

A.11 water was free from alkali. The water in all the lakes was clear and 
clean while that in the rivers and small creeks was dark in colour but had no 
objectionable taste or odour. 

Game. 

Moose are plentiful in all parts and particularly near the Black Sturgeon 
River. No caribou tracks were seen but signs of deer were noticed on the north 
boundary. 

Beavers are the most numerous fur bearing animals and nearly all creeks 
and lakes showed indication of their work. Bears are also numerous along the 
Black Sturgeon River but further in no signs of them were seen. The Indians 
report lynx, fisher, mink and fox in abundance, but rabbits, partridge and wolves 
are almost extinct. 

The lakes and rivers are well stocked with fish, pike being the most numerous. 
Black bass are found in the Black Sturgeon River and in Black Sturgeon Lake. 
The waters tributary to Lake Nipigon are nearly all good trout streams. 

The magnetic variation remained fairly constant at one degree and twenty- 
five minutes to one degree and thirty minutes. 

The maps supplied by your Department were found to be very reliable in 
most cases as also were those of the Geological Department of the Dominion 
Government. 

We have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Phillips & Benner, 

Per J. K. Benner. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



78 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 29. 
Survey of the Township of Williamson, in the District of Algoma. 

Parry Sound, October 15th, 1918. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
the Township of Williamson, in the District of Algoma. 

This township is bounded on the south by the Township of Owens, surveyed 
by O.L.S. Anderson in 1917, on the west by the Township of Idington, surveyed 
by O.L.S. Dobie in 1917-18, on the north and east by the unsurveyed Townships 
of Nixon and Teezel, respectively. The National Transcontinental Eailway crosses 
the south boundary about seventy-six miles west of Cochrane near the corner of 
lots eleven and twelve, a short distance west of Secord Station, and bearing in a 
direction a little north of west, crosses the west boundary in the fourth con- 
cession. It is therefore well supplied with railway facilities. 

I commenced my survey by chaining and posting the south boundary, making 
the lots the width shown in the field notes and from this boundary meridians 
were projected north astronomically in the centre of the road allowances, between 
lots six and seven, twelve and thirteen, eighteen and nineteen and between lots 
twenty-four and twenty-fi.ve. 

The centre lines of road allow^ances between the concessions were run as 
chords of latitude making the depths of the concessions as shown on plan and in 
the field notes, the survey being carried on in accordance with instructions; the 
lines being well cut out and blazed and substantial wooden posts planted at the 
corners of the lots with guide posts in the centre of the road allowances between 
the concessions opposite the lot corners. Bearing trees were marked for all lot 
posts as recorded in the field notes. Iron posts were planted alongside wooden 
posts where directed and their location is shown on plan and recorded in the field 
notes. I endeavoured faithfully to carry on my survey throughout in accordance 
with my instructions and the results in detail are shown on the plan and recorded 
in the field notes. Frequent observations for azimuth were taken, the magnetic 
variation being about seven degrees and fifteen minutes west of. north, 

A road allowance one chain in perpendicular width was laid out on each 
side of the right of way of the Trancontinental Eailway, on each side of Lost 
Eiver and around the lakes shown. I made a careful traverse of Lost Eiver, the 
course of which is very crooked, particularly in the first eight concessions, this 
stream has a considerable volume of water during spring freshets and early 
summer, and is navigable throughout by loaded canoes, but in August it became 
very shallow and had very little water in it so that we had difficulty moving 
our outfit up to the railroad, although canoes were not heavily loaded. That 
part of the river between lot fourteen, concession seventeen and the north boundary 
as well as that flowing through concessions eighteen to thirteen is obstructed with 
boulders in many places and must be rather turbulent in high water. I under- 
stand that the fire rangers travel up this river from the Kapuskasing to the 
railway. During August the water did not appear to be safe for drinking purposes 
without boiling. 

Timber. 

The township is thickly covered with timber and fire has run over about 
six per cent, of it, there being two small brules in the south-east corner, coverino- 
about four hundred acres, there is also between six and seven hundred acres 



I 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 79 

burned over in the south-west corner of the township and the largest area extends 
easterly from the west boundary in concession nine and covers an area of about 
two thousand acres. About fifty per cent, of the township is covered with spruce 
swamp with deep moss, the timber being from four to seven inches in diameter, 
the balance is principally spruce, poplar, balsam and white birch from four to 
twelve inches in diameter, the timber plan accompanying the report shows the 
dill'erent areas as accurately as could be ascertained during progress of survey. 
The largest timber being located east of Lost River, concessions one to six, 
inclusive. 

Soil. 

The soil generally is clay, about fifty per cent, of the area being covered 
with moss from six inches to two feet in depth and the balance with little or no 
moss. I estimate that about seventy-five per cent, is suitable for development 
for agricultural purposes but it will require considerable drainage, the highest 
area is along the railway and in the south-easterly portion of the township. 

Minerals and Rock. 

No indications of economic minerals were observed and comparatively few 
outcrops of rock were noted. A small quarry was opened on lot seventeen, con- 
cession three, on the east side of Lost River by the railway contractors. There 
are frequent rock outcrops in the bed of river in lots twelve and thirteen, con- 
cession eighteen. 

LiiKES AND Streams. 

Lost River varies in width from about one chain near the south boundary 
to one and one-half chains at the north and east boundaries. It has a good 
strong current during times of freshet and is rapid from concession seventeen to 
the north boundary and where it flows through the easterly part of township. 
Freshet level is about six feet higher than low water level and there are no falls 
within the limits of this township. There are only a few small lakes and they are 
shallow with low banks. 

Fisii AND Game. 

The fishing is rather poor l)ut during June and July we caught a few fair 
sized pike in Lost River and Solomon Creek and I understand pickerel and pike 
are plentiful in some of the lakes, particularly in the one on lots nineteen and 
twenty, concession five. 

Moose were very plentiful along Lost River, 

In conclusion, I consider that about seventy-five per cent, of this township 
will be available for agricultural development, the timber being chiefly valuable 
for pulpwood. Summer frosts occurred throughout the season which was a cold 
one, in places we found that the frost did not go out of the ground this year. 

Accompanying this report are a timber plan, general township plan, field 
notes, account in triplicate and the customary affidavits. 

I have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) David Beatty, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 

The llonourahle, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



80 . EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 30. 

Survey of Township Outlines Between Gkound Hog and Kapuskasing 
EiVEES^ IN the District of Timiskaming. 

New Liskeard, Ont., August 30th, 1919. 

SiR^ — Under instructions to us from Mr. L. V. Rorke, Director of Surveys, 
bearing date April 15th, 1919, our Mr. Neelands proceeded to Foleyet on the 
Canadian Northern Eailway, May 19th, and personally conducted the survey up 
to the time of its completion, July 10th. The party was supplied and outfitted 
by Mr. Henry Charron, Foleyet, and everything found satisfactory. Through 
the courtesy of Mr. Cyril T. Young, Supt. of The Eastern Lands Co., our supplies 
and equipment were delivered at Sandy Lake, two miles west of Foleyet, from 
which point a good canoe route via the Pishkanogama Eiver led directly to our 
starting point — the 63rd mile post on the late O.L.S. Niven's base line, N. lat. 
48 degrees, 27 minutes, 54 seconds; longitude 82 degrees, 26 minutes west. 

Sun and stellar observations were taken May 25th and 26th, at the post 
marked 63 M. -2 chains on the west bank, the 63 Mile Post coming in said river ; 
and the two chain offset made to the east and the meridian started the latter 
date. A wooden post and 1% in. iron post was planted on the north bank of 
the river 1.15 chains due north of said 63 M. point in river and wooden posts 
planted every mile and marked consecutively on the north side, while 11/4 in. 
iron posts were planted beside every third mile post except at township corners 
where 1% in. iron posts were planted. 

Our assistant, a returned man, was unable to handle the instrument, due 
to the rough nature of the ground in places and the extreme heat, but rendered 
valuable service in keeping notes copied and checked. 

Our original intention was to keep a small party on the meridian while a 
larger party took the east and west lines, but circumstances made it compulsory 
to conduct only one party. The 15 mile lake and the innumerable watercourses 
with which the country^ was reported to abound in, evaporated and we were 
forced to abandon canoes and use the pack strap to the end of the work. 

After the meridian had been run 9 miles, we ran east on a 9 mile chord 
of a parallel of latitude intersecting the Pishkanogama Eiver 1% miles east of 
said meridian, and planting posts as indicated above, except that a wooden and 
1% in. iron post was left at the 9 mile point with only township names thereon 
to be moved to the intersection by O.L.S. Fitzgerald. This line was then con- 
tinued on another 9 mile chord of the same parallel of latitude to the Ground 
Hog Eiver, a distance of 2 M. 62.69 chains where a wooden post was planted 
at high water mark and the above chainage inscribed thereon. Two l^/i in. iron 
posts were left beside said wooden post and Mr. Speight notified by letter con- 
cerning same. 

Eeturning to the starting point, a line was run west on a 9 mile chord of a 
])arallel of latitude a distance of 8 M. 77.95 chains to its intersection with 
O.L.S. Speight's meridian of 1909 hitting said line 0.87 chains north of the post 
as shown on copy of notes of said line furnished by your Department, but 0.02 
cliains south of a 2 in. hub planted in sink hole marking the intersection of a 
surveyed line running due west and on which was planted 0,54 chains west of 
said intersection and on the westerly bank of said sink hole a 6 in. spruce post 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OE LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 81 

marked on east side 54 and tied in two by two bearing trees, namely, 10 in. spruce 
N. 15 degrees west — 0.17 chains and 5 in. Balsam S. 45 degrees west^O.076 
chains. 

The hour being late and the distance to camp long and never doubting at 
the time but that the latter post was due west of the 9 mile point, the markings 
on the other post were neglected. So far we have been unable to get any light 
on the matter. 

The meridiffli was then produced another 9 miles and from this point a 
second east line run 9 miles with posts planted as per instructions, and a line 
west to said O.L.S. Speight's line, a distance of 8 miles 75.73 chains intersecting 
said line 0.49 chains south of XVIII mile post. 

The meridian was then produced 9 miles further and a third line run east 
and west, the latter at VIII M. 73.73 chains intersecting the production of said 
O.L.S. Speight's meridian 1.33 chains north of the XXVII mile post. 

Provisions by this time were running low, but we were able to run six 
more miles of meridian before being forced to abandon the work within sight 
of the goal. Had we been able to bring all the canoes along we would have 
completed the contract but the one small canoe was capable of carrying only our 
assistant and two canoemen to Fauquier on the T. C. Ey. over a route, the nature 
of which we did not know, but which if navigable would prove the most con- 
venient route by which to return to complete same or continue the outline work 
farther north another year. With this idea in mind we had our assistant make a 
compass survey of the route and have drafted same as per his notes on our returns 
to your Department. 

Instrument Woek. 

A Light Mountain Gurley instrument was used on the work, and from two 
to four observations taken every night that polaris was visible. These observations 
were facilitated by the use of curves previously plotted in our office for the 
latitude and longitude of the work, a copy of which we attach, and our watch 
set for solar time and corrected every few days. 

We found observations solved by the use of this curve to check to the half 
minute. 

Chainage. 

A chain of 400 links Avas used and the chainers cautioned not to break 
chain but read the inclination with an Abney hand level and reduce to horizontal 
distance, curves being also used for this purpose, a copy of which we attach. 
The chainers were duly sworn in on the ground at the starting point, the chain 
tested and re-checked twice during the survey, and we believe they strived hard 
to render correct measurements. 

Elevations of all hills were solved from the inclination angles ts&en while 
chaining. 

Posts and Bearing Trees. 

The most durable wood obtainable was selected and often carried many 
chains and marked by a scribe, while the iron posts were marked with a cold 
chisel. The largest trees were not selected for bearing trees but smaller and 
more healthy ones which would not likely for some time fall a prey to the axe 
of the lumberman, and these trees were chosen as far as possible in such a 



82 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

position that lines drawn from them to the post, formed an angle of approxi- 
mately 90 degrees or less, thereby making it the more easy at a future date to 
relocate the position of the post, should such be lost. 

Astronomic bearings of these trees were taken by the use of a wooden disk, 
so constructed that it rested firmly on the top of the post planted, in whatever 
position set, and the face of this circular disk was carved into ridges and grooves 
radiating from the centre and along which the chainman sighted after having 
set the cardinal points to correspond with the direction of the line being posted. 

Blazing of Lines. 

As five axemen in all were used on line the picket man was held responsible 
for the blazing and very satisfactorily accomplished same almost unaided. 

Timber. 

A great portion of the land lying east of the meridian has been burned over 
some twenty or thirty years ago and is being rapidly reforested with birch, 
poplar, spruce and tamarac. 

In this section on the first line east and on the fifth mile a narrow but good 
belt of jack pine has escaped and apparently runs in a northerly direction while 
.scattered trees occur a few miles east on same line. 

Very narrow ridges crossing the second line running east indicate what may 
be the northern boundary of a fair belt of tie timber, as jack pine suitable for 
tie timber also is present between the tenth and fifteenth mile posts on the 
meridian. 

The forest bordering the third line running east and as far north as the 
Wokomeesee River, for the most part is second growth as far as we could observe 
from the tops of hills and trees. 

West of the meridian the timber is very large and dense in many places, 
particularly in the Township of Wadsworth where spruce, balsam, balm of Gilead, 
poplar, birch and cedar attain a large size being sound as well, and some white 
pine and much scattered jack pine also is present although the white pine is not 
sound. 

The only clearly defined spruce forest present within the limits of our survey 
is located along the western side of the Townships of Wadsworth and Lisgar, 
apparently widening out farther north and following the western bank of the 
Wokomeesee River. Much of this timber is suitable for pulp and the balance 
will soon be large enough. 

Water Courses. 

Due to the drought, navigable routes, if they exist in average years, were 
limited in our case to the Osishana Creek and Paypeeshekameka River as far we§t 
as the meridian, also the Wokomeesee River for some distance south into Lisgar 
Township, but the Koamakashekak Creek and Otapingshewee River might be 
improved for driving purposes. 

Many of the lakes and creeks within the township lines were obtained from 
sketclies by trappers familiar with the country and although vouched for by tliom 
are not considered authentic by us, but have been shown with a vie\v to givin<:r 
i\]] the information acquired during the progress of the survey. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOKESTS AND MINES. 83 

EocK Formation. 

The country rock met with was for the inost part granite with a high per- 
centage of mica present in places, the only other formation met with being two out- 
croppings of schist, one in the third line east on the second mile and the other 
north of the XXIX mile post on the meridian. 

Agriculture. 

Most of the arable land is somewhat sandy and in places is suited for farming, 
but on the whole we think it better left unoccupied until present merchantable 
timbei* has been removed. 

Animal Life. 

Moose abound, indications of a few red deer were seen, wolves and bear are 
numerous, while the better class of fur bearing animals appear plentiful. 

Brook trout were caught in the Koamakashekak Creek and the Paypeesheka- 
meka Eiver with hook and line, and pike and pickerel in several lakes with the 
trawl, but further than this we cannot say with what varieties the lakes and 
streams are stocked. 

Flowers and Shrubs. 

None other than the varieties commonly met with in the great clay belt 
were observed along the lines surveyed by us. 

Water Powers. 

We did not have occasion to pass by any waterfalls but know of the existence 
of four in the Township of Stanley on the Pishkanogama Eiver, with an average 
head each of possibly 15 or 20 feet, three being within sight of each other. 

In conclusion, we beg to thank you for the work allotted to us and assure 
you that every effort was made to accomplish the character of work required by 
your Department, and at the same time make a few sorely needed dollars to 
lielp tide us over another year. 

We sincerely trust that the accompanying plan and field notes togetber with 
the timber plan will meet witli your approval, all of which is respectfully submitted. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) SUTCLIFFE & NeELANDS, 

Ontario Land Surveyor-;. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



84 - . . EEPORT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 31. 

Survey of the Outlines of the Pic Eiver Pulpwood and Timber Limit, 

District op Thunder Bay. 

NiPiGON, Ont., August 2ncl, 1919. 

Sir, — I beg to submit the following report on the survey of the outlines of the 
Pic Eiver Pulp and Timber Limit, surveyed by me under instructions from 
the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines, dated Toronto, April 15th, 1919. 

Pursuant to instructions, I commenced my survey at the point in which the 
centre line of the main track of the Canadian Pacific Eailway is intersected by 
the line between townships numbers 73 and 74, as located on the ground by 
E. Stewart, O.L.S., in his survey of township outlines along the C.P.E. in 1894. 
From this said point I ran north astronomically a distance of 32 miles and 25 
links to the north-east angle of the pulp limit, this said line forming the easterly 
boundary thereof. I planted the 4 Mile Post as directed in my instructions and at 
the end of each mile thereafter I planted a wooden post. These posts were made 
of the most durable wood obtainable. In a very few instances it was found 
absolutely necessary to use balsam posts but the great majority of the posts, as shown 
on my field notes, are either of spruce or of Banksian pine. Wherever possible, I 
placed a cairn of stones about the post. I planted iron posts beside the wooden 
posts at the end of every third mile, as instructed and marked the iron posts 
with a cold chisel. The iron and wooden posts are marked with Eoman numerals, 
marked with the number of the mile from the initial point of each line. I 
marked two bearing trees, wherever possible, for each mile post. These are shown 
on my field notes. In some instances, it was impossible to get any bearing trees; 
these instances are also noted in field notes. Unless otherwise specified in my 
field notes, all wooden posts planted were dressed six inches square. All posts were 
firmly planted in the ground, and after being set, stand at least three feet above 
tlie ground. 

From the north-east angle of the Pulp Limit, I ran west astronomically on six 
mile chords of the parallel of latitude, a distance of 46 miles to the north-west 
angle of the limit, and from that point, I ran south astronomically to the shore 
line of Lake Superior. Where the end of a mile came in a lake, as it did in several 
instances, I planted a post on the nearest shore and marked it to show its distance 
from the true position. 

Where the distance across a lake or river could not be obtained with a steel 
tape in the usual way, I obtained the width by triangulation. The base of the 
triangles employed in this work was, in all but two or three instances, made of 
sufficient length to give an angle opposite the base of not less than ten degrees. 
Frequent astronomical observations for azimuth were taken and the notes of these 
I am enclosing with my field notes. My lines of survey were well cut out and 
particular attention was paid to the blazing thereof. On ithe north boundary there 
is a burnt area of eleven miles in extent. There was no timber on this area 
so no blazing at all could be done. However, I had my picket man plant pickets 
with a mound of stone about them whenever he could do so, to render it possible 
to find and follow this line. Wherever there was green timber, the line was well 
hlazed in the prescribed manner. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AN D MINES. 85 

Soil. 

The easterly boundary of the limit, ran, for the better part of its length 
through rocky country, this being granite. There were some sandy areas, as 
shown on the field notes, but for the most part, this line ran through a rough, 
rolling, rocky country. This kept up along the northerly boundary until I had 
crossed the Pic River. From this point on, along the northerly boundary, the 
soil was clay, Avhere it was not rocky. The westerly boundary was also rocky, 
very rough, with, however, sandy soil between the areas of rocky land. In general, 
the entire outline of this limit may be said to be very rough and rocky, especially 
along the northerly boundary where sheer cliffs of from 100 to 400 feet are met 
with. The areas of clay and sandy soil met with were so small in extent as 
to be of no interest from an agricultural standpoint. 

Timber. 

As shown on the field notes for the several lines, the prevailing timber is 
spruce and balsam, birch and poplar. There was some Banksian pine met with 
but not in sufficient quantities or of sufficient size to be of commercial value. 
In fact, no tie timber was encountered at all on this survey except through the small 
area that had previously been cut over on the westerly boundary. Although the 
survey lines ran through spruce and balsam, in some cases of considerable size, 
there were no areas encountered that would be of interest commercially. It was a 
constant source of wonder to me as to where the areas of pulpwood did lie, I 
having heard that this was a wonderful limit for pulpwood. Undoubtedly, the 
areas referred to must lie well within the limit. There was no white or red pine, 
and no cedar met with. As stated above, there is an eleven-mile burn on the 
north boundary, twice burnt over, extending four miles to the south and two miles 
to the north of the northerly limit. 

Minerals. 

The formation for the greater part of the area, as covered by me, was of 
granite. There were small areas, especially on the northerly boundary which would 
warrant the attention of prospectors. My men brought back samples of free gold 
and some samples of copper. If it is the wish of the Department, I will be glad 
to forward these to Toronto. I might add that iron pyrites were found to some 
extent along the westerly boundary. 

Game. 

The country abounds in wild game. Moose and cariboo were found in great 
abundance. The smaller lakes along the northerly boundary being great natural 
feeding places for them. Partridges were found in large numbers. As shown 
on the notes, there are many small beaver meadows. Beaver are very plentiful 
in this area. The fishing is excellent, speckled trout being in abundance in all of 
the streams met with. The lakes are full of pike and pickerel. On two of the 
larger lakes, lake trout seemed very plentiful. 

Lakes and Streams. 

A glance at the plan will show better than a description can, the lakes and 
rivers met with on this survey. The principal rivers being the Pic, Little Pic 



86 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

and Steel. The larger lakes being the Whitefish, Trout and Owl. There arc 
innumerable small streams and small lakes in this large area. I have endeavoured 
to show these and the connections between them on my plan. It must be under- 
stood, however, that this is a most incomplete plan, as far as water routes are 
coiicerned. There were no places where I considered that a reservation should 
be made to the Crown of water powers. There may be such areas within the 
limit, but at or near the boundaries as run by me, there were no areas of sufficient 
importance to warrant any special attention. 

Conclusion. 

I feel, sir, that this report is not complete in detail, but the plan and field 
notes will show the extent of the timber areas, will show the rivers and lakes, 
canoe routes, burnt and cut-over areas, better than they can be covered in any 
report. If there are any inquiries that you, sir, may wish to make, or that the 
Department wishes to make, I will be glad to go into further detail as well as 
I can. As a timber report, this report will be of no value, for we encountered 
no timber on the survey — that is, no timber of commercial value and in sufficient 
quantity to warrant timbering operations to drive it to the lake. 

I trust, sir, that my plan and field notes will be found to be correct and 
in good order, and that the lines of survey as run on the ground, may be found 
by your Inspector to be well cut out and blazed, the posts well marked and planted. 
All possible care was taken to follow the instructions, both written and printed 
in this and other respects. 

I have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) M. E. Crouch, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honorable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 32. 
Survey of the Tow^nship of Gumming, District of Algoma. 

Sault Ste. Marie, January 16th, 1919. 

Si]^^ — We have the honour to report that under instructions dated the 26th 
of June, 1918, we have subdivided the Township of Cumming into farm lots 
of approximately 100 acres each. We commenced the survey by running south 
astronomically the sideline between Lots 6 and 7 from the north boundary of the 
township. This line is a continuation of the corresponding sideline in the Town- 
ship of Idington subdivided by O.L.S. Dobie. We cut this line for approximately 
9 miles taking a number of observations. We next ran the south boundary of the 
township running due west from a post marked 9 M. planted by O.L.S. Niven in 
1906 to the intersection with another meridian also run by O.L.S. Mven in 1906. 



k 



[ 1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 87 

These meridian lines are approximately 9 miles apart. We continued the survey 
tliroughout the township observing Polaris frequently for meridian and correcting 
any small errors found in the direction of the lines. A traverse was made of all 
lakes found in the township. 

There are no rivers of importance in the township. Lost River is not navi- 
gable and cannot be used even for canoe travel as it is filled with log jams and 
contains many beaver dams. During the summer season parts of this river are 
practically dry. 

The whole of the township is quite level, there are a few clay ridges which 
are unimportant. Rock outcrops only in three or four places in the whole town- 
ship. The formation consists of Keewatin greenstone and schist. Near the south 
boundary of the township there are strong indications of magnetic deposits. A 
few mining claims were staked on these indications in 1913 but were apparently 
al)andoned as there are no signs of work having been done. 

The soil is principally clay or clay loam. This is covered in the green bush 
with about tAvelve inches of moss and black muck but in the brule the clay is lying- 
exposed. We would consider fully seventy-five per cent, of this township fit for 
agricultural purposes. Portions of the brule are sparsely timbered and could be 
(bleared with very little work. 

The timber in the township is nearly all spruce up to about 8 in. in diameter. 
On the ridges and higher ground considerable poplar and birch is found. There 
are also quantities of cedar in the swamps near the west boundary of the township. 
The brule is generally covered with small spruce and alders and is about twenty 
years of age. Evidently this country was fire swept about eighty years ago as no 
standing timber exists older than this. 

No fish of any importance were noticed in the township. The lakes are all 
marshy and shallow and only a few pike exist in these. Moose and beaver are 
quite plentiful. There is no settlement of any description within the limits of 
tlio township. 

The average magnetic variation we found to be 7 deg. west of north. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Lang, Ross & Ramsey, 

Ontario Land Surveyor?. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 33. 

Traverse Survey of the Opazatika River and Lakes, Pishkanogama Lake, 
Ground Hog and Horwood Lake, and SAiTKATAWiciiTAti River and Lake. 

. Cobalt, November 12th, 1919. 

Sir, — In obedience to your instructions, dated May 2nd, 1919, to traverse 
certain lakes and rivers in the Districts of Sudbury and Algoma, I have surveyed 
as much of my contract as was possible and beg to report as follows: — 



EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



EouTiNE OF Work. 

On May 16th, I left Cobalt with my party. We commenced the survey of 
Opazatika Eiver at the south boundary of McCrea Township on May 19th, and 
worked upstream in a southerly direction through Opazatika Eiver, Eufus, Penelton 
and Opazatika Lakes, finishing this portion of the work on July 4th. From 
Opazatika Lake we came down stream to the National Transcontinental Eailway 
and boarded train to Foleyet on Canadian Northern Ontario Eailway. 

The survey of Pishkanogama Lake was commenced at the south boundary of 
Foleyet Township on July 14th, and finished on August 5th." Camp was moved 
to Ground Hog Lake. 

The survey of Ground Hog Lake was commenced at the south boundary of 
the north half of Keith Township on August 9th, continued through Ground 
Hog Eiver to Horwood Lake. Through Horwood Lake and the north-east arm 
thereof and tied on to the north boundary of Dale Township. This work was 
finished on September 13th and camp moved south to Sahkatawichtah Eiver. 

The survey of Sahkatawichtah Eiver was commenced at the south boundary 
of Dale Township on September 16th and continued southerly to Sahkatawichtah 
Lake. The survey of this lake was completed with the exception of a small 
portion. at the north-west end. This is shown dotted on the plan. 

For some time the weather had been stormy and wet, making it difficult to 
get readings and dangerous for men in canoes owing to the size of the lake. On 
the morning of September 30th I moved camp to Ground Hog. On October 1st, 
I paid off my party with the exception of C. E. Code, O.L.S.,. who has assisted 
me in preparing plans of the work. 

From considerable traverse work I have done in winter I think that about 
as good progress can be made then as in summer. As blazed trees are used to 
tie in traverse points, the difficulty of planting posts in winter is not encountered. 
The main traverse being chained on the ice, is very accurate. Even with the 
snow, the shore line can be determined very accurately. If you so desire, I shall 
be glad to continue the survey as soon as the ice becomes good. 

The following is the mileage of traverse : — 

Opazatika — Sahkatawichtah River 6.5 

River 25.5 Sahkatawichtah Lake ... 20.0 

Lakes 83.5 Sahkatawichtah Islands ... 1.5 

Islands 16.5 28.0 

125.5 

Pishkanogama — 

Ground Hog — Shore Line Blue .... 61.7 

Horwood Lake 45 . 8 iShore Line Brown 69.8 

Ground Hog River 4.5 Islands 4.7 

Ground Hog Lake 10.5 136.2 

Islands G. H. L 2.0 

Islands Horwood Lake... 3.0 Total 355.5 

65.8 

This total is only approximate. 

Method of Survey. 
(a) Instruments used. 

Except in the survey of Pishkanogama Lake, where most of distances between 
stations were chained on the sand, the traverse was made by stadia readings for 
distance. Azimuth ano^les were carried through with a transit. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 89 

The stadia rods used read direct to tenths of links. The accuracy of readings 
was checked from time to time by readings on measured lines and also on the 
sides of triangles, calculated from chained base measurements. They were found 
to be very accurate. Eesults are shown in the field notes. 

Field Notes. 

(6) One form of field notes was kept throughout the course of the work. 
The notes were transcribed in ink and carefully checked. They show — station, 
azimuth, distance, angle right, bearing, and under remarks, the point on which 
the reading was taken. 

(c) Observations, — Observations were taken frequently on Polaris and the sun 
for azimuth. The calculations are shown in the field notes. 

(d) Posts and blazed trees. — On rivers and around the shores of lakes, trees 
were blazed at intervals of about one mile and were marked " 1 M," " 2 M," 
" 3 M," etc. Records of these are shown on the plans and in the field notes. 

On islands, stump posts were made. A good sound tree was felled and the 
stump squared and marked with a letter " A, B, C," etc. Except in a few cases 
where the islands were very small, when a tree was blazed. The bearings shown 
to posts and trees are astronomical. 

(e) Survey lines, township boundaries. — In all cases where survey lines were 
found ; they were tied in and are shown on the plans. Posts were planted one 
chain from the shore on each side of the river or lake, where this had not been 
done in the original survey. 

At the south end of Pishkanogama Lake, on the Avest side, we found what 
appears to be the production across the lake of O.L.S. Sinclairjs line, run in 
1867. We tried to find more blazed trees by turning an azimuth of 90 degrees, 
but the others seemed to have been burned as it is a very old brule at this point. 
The tree we found is a fourteen-inch cedar, blazed on three sides and marked 
" IXMIX." The wood grown over the blazes seems to be about 32 years old 
and the cedar has been dead probably 20 years. 

Descriptions of Lakes and Rivers. 
(a) OpazatiJca River and Lakes. 

Shores. — Opazatika River has an average width of about two chains. The 
sliores are clay, except in a few places where rock outcrops. The land back from 
the banks is nearly all an old brule grown up with poplar of from three to four 
inches in diameter down to mere brush. The soil is a good clay loam very 
suitable for agriculture, and very easily cleared at present while this growth 
is small. 

The shores of Rufus, Penelton and Opazatika Lakes are rocky and, as the brule 
extends here also, there is very little valuable timber. 

Water Powers. — There is only one falls of real value from a power viewpoint. 
This is on the Opazatika River at the eleventh mile post of the traverse, south 
of McCrea Township. 

Owing to wind I was unable to get the flow measurement. The head is 
23.7 feet. 

One hundred and sixty acres should be quite sufficient land for development 
purposes. The two snapshots shown below are of this falls. 



90 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Islands. — There are thirty-six islands in Opazatika Lake. The largest one 
contains 776.8 acres. The next largest 24 acres. The majority of the remainder 
are small. They are almost all very rocky and timbered with jack pine, spruce, 
birch, poplar and balsam. A3 which is the largest is nearly all brule. 

(&) Pishkanogama Lake. 

Shores. — The shores at the north end of Pishkanogama Lake are of sand. 
Sandhills rising from the original shore line are timbered with jack pine, some 
spruce and balsam, birch and poplar. At the narrows of the lake rock outcrops. 
From this point to the south end of the lake, the shores are rocky. 

A considerable amount of the timber has been destroyed by fire, particularly 
at the south end of the lake and along the west shore from the narrows south. 
There is, however, considerable good timber on the west side of the lake. Jack 
pine and spruce averaging from 10 to 13 inches in diameter, also balsam, birch 
and poplar. 

Towards the south end of the lake the ground rises very quickly from the 
shore line, and from portions I was over, I would say was not favourable for 
agriculture. 

The original water level of the lake has been lowered at the north end 19.4 
feet. This leaves a series of small mud rapids at the narrows. The water im- 
mediately above the narrows is very shallow, making progress in canoes difficult 
for a distance of about one mile. The difference in elevation between the original 
and present water level above the rapids at the narrows is 10.8 feet. At the 
south end of the lake the water has been lowered 11.7 feet. The two snapshots 
showji below were taken from the north end of the lake looking south. 

At the north end of the lake, the bottom exposed is sand. From the narrows 
south, it is a mixture of sand and clay. 

On the plan of survey I have shown the land between the original and present 
water level coloured a light brown. 

Islands. — There are fifteen islands in Pishkanogama Lake. The largest, 
Island F, containing 34.6 acres. The next largest. Island C, 6.8 acres. The 
remainder are, very small. With the water at its present elevation, most of. the 
islands are really mainland. The acreage shown on the plan is for that area 
which is within the original shore line. All the islands are well timbered, and 
under natural conditions must be very pretty. The soil is sandy with rock out- 
oroppings. 

(c) Ground Hog Lake and River. 

Shores. — The shores of Ground Hog Lake are fairly high. The ground 
rises sliarply from the shore line. The land is rocky covered in places with a 
heavy overburden of clay and gravel. 

The north, west and south shores are fairly well timbered, but the east shore 
is most brule. 

Islands.^There are five islands in Ground Hog Lake. Island A, containing 
28.8 acres. The next largest. Island C, containing 5.2 acres. The remainder are 
very small. With the exception of A, which is sand and gravel, they are rocky. 
All are well timbered. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT 0¥ LANDS, FOKESTS AND MINES. 91 

The river south from Ground Hog Lake has an average width of five chains. 
The current is slow. At station 16, 17 and 18, there are rapids with a total fall 
of 4.6 feet. The banks of the river are mostly flat. Considerable ash is to be 
found along them, some of it running as large as ten inches in diameter. 

(d) Horwood Lake. 

Shores. — The shores of Horwood Lake are very rocky. The north-east arm 
shores being particularly high and rough. 

Timber. — The west side and the north-east end of the lake proper, are well 
timbered with jack pine, spruce, balsam, birch and poplar, while the remainder 
is old brule with patches of second growth jack pine, spruce, poplar and birch. 

The north-east arm from the narrows at its outlet up to about half way up 
the arm, say to station 64, is old brule with patches of jack and red pine. From 
station 64 to the north end is good timber, jack pine, spruce, balsam, birch and 
poplar with good cedar along the shores. 

Islands. — The islands in Horwood Lake are all rocky and with the exception 
of the large island at the north end of the lake proper, which is brule, are all 
well timbered. 

(e) Sahhatawichtali River and LaJce. 

Shores. — The shores of Sahkatawichtah Eiver and Lake are fairly rocky. 
The ground back from the shore is high and rough. 

Timber. — The shores along the river are mostly old brule. 

The north-west side and the north-east end of the lake are practically all 
brule, while the south-east shore is well timbered with spruce, jack-pine and 
balsam. 

Islands. — The islands are all rocky and fairly well timbered. They are all 
small. 

Accompanying this report are: — ' . . 



Plans. 



Opazatika River and Lakes. 
Pishkanogama Lake. 
Ground Hog and Horwood Lakes. 
Sahkatawichtah River and Lake. 



Field Notes. 



Three field books containing notes of all the above plans. 
The above is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant. 



(Sgd.) T. G. Code, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



The Honourable, the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



92 EEPOET OP THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 34^. 

Survey of Township Outlines in the District of Sudbury. 

Orillia, October 31st, 1919. 

SiR^ — Upon receipt of your instructions bearing date of the twenty-second 
day of April, 1919, for the survey of township outlines in the District of Sudbury, 
we proceeded to make such preparations as were necessary to carry out the work 
outlined therein. 

The unsettled condition due to after-war unrest, effecting especially the labour 
market, and to a lesser extent the procuring of certain kinds of supplies and 
their transportation, consumed a good deal of time, and it was not until the 
27th day of June following, that we were able to leave with our party for the 
site of the work, although we had men stationed at Agate for some time previously 
awaiting the arrival of supplies. All through the work this state of unrest was 
reflected in the working forces, and added not a little to the difficulties ordinarily 
encountered. 

The Indians in the upper country also, admittedly the best men procurable 
for this class of work, experienced a heavy mortality during the past winter, through 
the outbreak of Spanish influenza, and many of those who were fortunate enough 
to recover, were in poor condition to withstand the hard work and exposure 
involved. 

Heavy bush fires to the south and west lent an occasional smoke pall of some 
days* duration, at times thick enough to render sighting difficult; while from 
the latter part of August and through September, there was a period of almost 
constant rain. 

Sending our main supplies to Agate to be transported up the Chapleau River, 
we left the Canadian National Eailway at Missonga and proceeded to the south- 
west angle of the Township of Shenango, where the survey was commenced. 
Running the meridian from this point due south to its intersection with the 
base line run by O.L.S. Speight, we proceeded west, and in general followed the 
programme laid down in the instructions. Six inch square wooden posts were 
planted at every mile, or at the nearest shore where water interruptions occurred, 
with the addition of an iron post at three mile intervals, and marked with the 
mileage or the township names. Astronomical observations were taken wherever 
desirable, when weather conditions permitted, and a close alignment maintained. 
Base lines Avere run on the chord of the parallel. Details of all operations will 
be found in the plans and field notes returned herewith. 

The country traversed, lying as it does along the southerly edge of the 
clay belt, possesses the characteristics of border topography, and marks the transi- 
tion from the rougher rockbound hill country to the south, to the level expanses of 
the clay belt. The surface is one of short broken undulations, seldom interrupted 
by sharply rising hills, and such of these as do occur rarely exceed forty or fifty 
feet in altitude. Comparing this section with surrounding areas, we might say 
that to the south are storm tossed waves, here .a rippled surface and to the north 
a placid calm. 

Rock outcrops are not numerous, the country being well covered, and such 
exposures as do occur apparently belonging to the Laurentian formation. 

Two main drainage, channels traverse this area, flowing toward the north. 
Trout River crossed by the base line between Sherlock and Lincoln at VI 3-4 M. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 93 

and following closely the course of the meridian between Lincoln and Copperfield, 
is a leisurely stream affording an excellent canoe route, and imposes only one 
obstacle in its course through these townships, in the form of a fall of some 
fifteen feet, opposite the four mile post, where a portage of about five chains 
is required. From opposite Vi/^ to VIIII/2 miles, this stream widens into a 
lake expansion, with well wooded shores and four islands of six to eighteen chains 
in length. From the last mentioned point the course of the river turns south- 
easterly. 

Chapleau River, crossed by the base line between Bonar and Copperfield at 
mileage 3i/4 and by the meridian Sherlock-Bonar at VI M -|- 22.70' chains and 
entering Agate Lake in the Township of Kapuskasing; is of quite a different 
character; and is marked by many shallow rapids in its course through Bonar 
and Sherlock, rendering it a poor stream for travel by canoe. A fall of about 
fifteen feet occurs a short distance north of the south boundary of Bonar, and 
another about two and a half miles further south. The banks of this stream 
are usually low, and must occasion a good deal of flooding at spring levels. Its 
general width is from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet, of comparatively 
shallow depth, and good current. 

A creek or river enters the Chapleau about opposite IV M. on the Bonar- 
Sherlock meridian. This stream flows from a considerable lake, approaching the 
south boundary of Bonar at V. M. and in its westerly continuation crosses the 
meridian Bonar-Lloyd at II M -[- 67 chains. It is also shallow and tortuous, 
with many rapids, and difficult of navigation. Its general width is about one 
hundred feet. 

The lake through which this latter river passes, is of peculiar bifurcated 
outline, about two and a half miles from north to south by an extreme width of 
a mile and a quarter. It possesses deep, clear water, high and beautifully wooded 
shores and sand beaches; a campers' playground were it for difficulty of access. 

The only other considerable lakes noted were that at the intersection Shenango- 
Sherlock-Lemoine-Lincoln ; and one whose easterly end is crossed by the meridian 
Lemoine-Lincoln between VII and VIII M. Both these lakes find an outlet to 
ihe east. 

Soil. 

The soil throughout the area through which the outlines pass is of a sandy 
character, usually mixed with boulders or gravel, and cannot be classed as even 
fair agricultural land. In places, notably along the Sherlock-Bonar meridian, a 
very hard subsoil occurs, of a sand-clay mixture, at a depth of a foot, and effectually 
prevents trees from obtaining an adequate roothold. 

Timber. 

Extending from ID/^ M. to VII14 M". on base line Sherlock-Lincoln, there 
is an area of heavy timber, chiefly of jack pine of a diameter from six to twenty 
inches. This is in thick stand, tall and good, and would afford excellent oppor- 
tunity for log and tie making. Many of the trees of smaller size would cut out 
five to six railway ties. Large single trees of spruce, poplar and birch also occur 
in this area. 

Considerable jack pine of merchantable size also grows along the south boundary 
of Bonar west of the Chapleau River from IV M. westerly and extends northerly 



94 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

along the west boundary of that township, where, however, it takes on a more 
limby character, than that further east. 

Eed pine up to twenty inches, and to the extent of perhaps a thousand trees, 
was found growing on the peninsula separating the two arms of the lake opposite 
V M. south boundary of Bonar, Exclusive of scattered trees of rare occurrence, 
this was the only block of white or red pine observed, save for a clump of mature 
white pine apparently of small extent, on the hill at IV M. + 50 chains on the 
meridian Lemoine-Lincoln, 

Outside of the two areas above described, the central southerly part of 
Sherlock-Lincoln, and southwesterly part of Bonar, the forest throughout this 
region, in so far as could be observed from outlines run, does not appear to offer 
great encouragement for timbering operations. Everywhere large single trees are 
met with, especially of spruce which furnishes some fine examples of tree growth, 
and occasional large poplar and white birch. In some of the swamps, also, and 
along the river banks, cedar from fifteen to twenty-four inches in diameter is 
found growing. This is of fair length and sound, but no large area of this species 
was seen. 

The general character of the growth, however, is immature and would afford 
but a small proportion of timber of logging size. This condition may be due 
to fornier fires, where sufficient time has not elapsed to give a mature growth, 
except for those trees which weathered the conflagration. In some localities it 
would appear, however, to be due to a hard impenetrable subsoil; where as soon 
as a tree attains a height of thirty to forty feet, it is in imminent danger of being 
uprooted by the wind. This latter condition is specially evident along the Sherloek- 
Bonar meridian. Indeed, through the whole area windfallen timber is much in 
evidence and constitutes a serious fire menace. Almost everywhere the ground 
is covered with a thick undergrowth; alder on the lower levels, moosewood and 
hazel, on the higher lands. 

To the southward and extending up to the lake expansion of the Trout Eiver 
in the southwesterly part of Lincoln, which marks its northerly limit; the country 
has been effectually fire scorched, and is occupied by young growth of a few 
years. Crossing the south boundary of Bonar from V M. -j- 16 chains to 40^ 
chains and extending northeasterly to the lake shore; there is also a small burnt 
area, but only in these two localities does the country show the effect of fires of 
the past thirty or forty years, being uniformly green. 

In common with much of the country to the south, this area would probably 
find its most advantageous disposition by being included in forest reserve; and 
the greater part of it by being allowed a considerable time to mature its timber 
before logging operations are undertaken. This, of course, being contingent upon 
the feasibility of properly protecting it from fire. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Cavana & Watson, 

Ontario Land Surveyor^ 

The Honourable, ihe Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 95 



Appendix No. 35. 

Traverse Survey up Lakes, Rivers and Portages in the Timagami Forest 
Reserve, Districts of Sudbury and Nipissing, 

Parry Sound, December 5th, 1919. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the traverse survey 
uplakes, rivers and portages in the Timagami Forest Reserve, Districts of Sudbury 
and Nipissing under instructions bearing date April 30th, 1919. 

I left Parry Sound with cook and one man May 15th, and proceeded by rail 
to Timagami Station, reaching there in the afternoon of May 16th, where I was 
met by assistant Coltham. 

Owing to the high wind on Timagami Lake, I was compelled to secure the 
services of a gasoline launch to transport my men and supplies to Bear Island 
which I reached late Tuesday evening, thus compelling me to put up my men 
and myself at the hotel for night. Owing to rain on May 17th, we were com- 
pelled to seek the shelter of the hotel until evening, when we were able to pitch 
our tents where we remained until the following Monday morning. At Bear 
Island we secured the services of two Indians. 

May 18th we proceeded to Gull Lake which we reached the same evening in 
time to pitch our tents. After testing our micrometer by chained distances, we 
commenced the traverse of Gull Lake the following Tuesday. This is a fair size 
lake with numerous islands, covered with red and white pine. The shores of- 
Gull Lake are Jiigh and very rocky and in some places are steep. 

After completing this lake we traversed Skunk and Allan Lake, and also 
made a chained traverse of the portages between these lakes. 

On June the 3rd, we moved camp to Turtle Lake, where on the following 
morning we obtained a Polaris observation. The shores of this lake are high 
and rocky. 

From here we moved camp back to Gull Lake, where we traversed the two 
small lakes Long and Cummings. 

June 16th we moved from Gull to Devil's Lake, which we commenced to 
traverse on the following day. This lake appears very deep with high rocky 
shores. There are the remains of a mining shack on the east shore of this lake. 

The next lake to be traversed was Emerald, a beautiful lake with numerous 
sand beaches and projecting points. The remains of a mining camp with numerous 
buildings are found along the west shore. 

On June 27th, we proceeded to make a traverse of the small lakes, Aleck, 
Woods, Moses and Kibble. These lakes are situated among high hills with high 
rocky shores, therefore, joined by portages. i^ 

From here we moved camp to Obabika Lake. This is the largest lake that 
we encountered on our work and was visited by a large number of tourists during 
the summer. The shores are generally high and rocky with numerous sand beaches 
and a few marshy bays. Along the banks are red and white pine, cedar and 
birch. On completing this lake, and smaller ones adjacent thereto, we made a 
traverse of the Obabika River as far as the storage dam. 

Our next lake was Wakimika whicli was reacbed by a river of the same name. 
Tlio south end of this lake is marshy with high rocky shores elsewhere. 

I'lom here we proceeded across two portages to Diamond Lake. The shores 
of tbis lake are high and rocky with higli hills surrounding them. 



96 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

Completing this lake we moved across a one and three-quarter mile portage 
to Willow Island Lake. This is a long narrow lake with a few scattered islands. 
The shores are generally rocky with numerous sand beaches. This lake is con- 
nected by a narrow strait of water with Lake Sucker Gut, the survey of which 
was completed on August 27th. From here we moved camp across many lakes 
and portages to the Obabika Eiver, on arrival there- we traversed river to the 
junction with the Sturgeon. The Sturgeon Eiver averages between one and one- 
half to two chains wide with high clay banks ranging between six feet and fourteen 
feet high, very few outcrops of rock are found. The land is a sandy loam and 
appears well adapted for agricultural purposes. Considerable horse-power could 
be developed on the Upper and Lower Goose Falls met with on this river. 

Our next work was the traverse of Grassy Lake which was reached by canoe 
and portage. The west end of this lake is marshy with sand beaches on the east 
side. After completing the traverse of portage route to Devil's Lake, we con- 
nected up our survey with previous work. 

Along the shores of the lakes and rivers trees were blazed and marked with 
a designating number as 1, 2, 3, etc., where shown. 

On each island of any size a tree was blazed and marked with the numbers 
" A," " B," " C," etc., as shown in plans. 

Fish and Game. 

Fish of many kinds, especially trout and black bass were found in the different 
waters throughout the work. 

Moose and red deer were very plentiful, with many signs of beaver workings. 

Accompanying this report are my diary; plans of Jakes on linen, scale twenty 
chains to an inch; field notes of part of line between Townships of MacBeth and 
Clement; and my account in triplicate, which I trust you will find in order. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

- ' Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) David Beatty/ 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



Appendix No. 36. 
Settler's Loan Commissioner. 

Toronto, October 31st,«1919. 
l^o the Honourahle the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, Toronto, Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to herewith submit a report of the operations conducted by this 
Department under the Northern & Northwestern Ontario Development Act, 
Amending Acts 1916 and 1918. 

Up to October 31r *-, 1919, a total of 2,001 applications for loans were received, 
asking for an amount of $776,790.00, an average of $382.39 per application. With 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 97 

every desire to co-operate and assist deserving settlers, careful consideration was 
given to each individual request, and loans advanced, on the basis of security 
offered in the way of improved land, where it was clearly shown the money could 
be used to good advantage in the improvement of settlement conditions. 

A total of 1,414 loans were made to settlers amounting to $442,256.00, an 
average of $312.76, and in addition a loan of $12,000,00 was advanced to the 
Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co.^ Ltd., the loans being distributed over the 
various districts as follows : 

District. No. of Loans. Amount. 

Algoma . . ' 17 $4,525 00 

Kenora 115 33,545 00 

Nipissing 64 22,750 00 

Rainy River 121 38,300 00 

Sudbury 29 21,725 00 

Temiskaming 635 197,265 00 

Thunder Bay 434 136,146 00 



Totals 1,415 $454,256 00 

Reports received and observations made would indicate that the loans granted 
have been of great benefit to the settler struggling to get sufficient clearing to 
enable him to stay at home and work the land, and to get some live stock with 
which to carry on. 

Repayment of loans has been very satisfactory as is evidenced by the fact 
that almost 90 per cent, of the interest payments are up-to-date and payments 
of principal have exceeded the amount due, on account of some loans being paid 
oif in advance. 

In conclusion, would direct your attention to the following memorandum giving 
further details of operations carried on, and would say that appreciation of the 
small loans granted under easy conditions of repayment has often been expressed 
by the individual settlers concerned. 

MEMORANDUM OP SETTLERS' LOANS TO OCTOBER 31sT, 1919. 

Applications. 

Total number of applications received 2,001 

Total amount applied for $776,790 00 

Average per application 382 39 

Amount applied for under approved applications 564,640 00 

Loans. 

Number of loans issued 1,415 

Equal to 70% of applications. 
Amount granted $454,256 00 

Equal to 58% of total amount applied for and 

Equal to 80% of total amount applied for under approved 
applications. 

Average loan $312 76 

Total acreage covered by liens 217,040 

Acreage improved land 29,729 

Equal to 13.6% of total acreage. 

Average loan per acre on total acreage $2 03 

Average loan per acre on acreage improved land 14 87 

Note. — 'Figures, except averages, include application for, and loan of $12,000 to 
Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd. 

7 F.M. 



98 EEPOET OP THE No. 3 



Repayments. 

Accrued interest due $48,402 90 

Accrued interest received 42,974 63 or 88.78% 

Payments on principal due 70,469 71 

Payments on principal received 70,500 25 or over 100% 

Total payments due 118,872 61 

Total payments received 113,474 88 or 95.45% 

Unpaid Principal and Accrued Interest Outstanding. 

District. Amount. 

Algoma |4,026 74 

Kenora 28,492 00 

Nipissing 19,042 50 

Rainy River 33,184 15 

Sudbury 20,544 55 

Timiskaming 162,168 78 

Thunder Bay 121,725 30 

Total $389,184 02 

Yours very truly, 

F. Dane^ 
Settlers' Loan Commissioner. 



Appendix No. 37. 

Algonquin Peovinoial Paek. 

Supeeintendent's Eepoet. 

Algonquin Park, October 31st, 1919, 

Honourable Sie^, — I beg to hand you my twenty-first annual report on the 
Algonquin Provincial Park for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1919. 

Situated as Algonquin Park is, only 169 miles from the capital of Canada, 
206 miles from Toronto, within easy journey of the principal cities of the United 
States and crossed by two important railways, the Grand Trunk and Canadian 
ISTational, it has become a very popular health and pleasure resort. The angler, too, 
from all over the continent has found in the hundreds of lakes and the numerous 
rivers which take their rise in the Park, sport that cannot be surpassed in any 
part of America. Salmon trout are found in all our lakes, and speckled trout in 
most of them and all our streams. During the past season some very fine speci- 
mens were, taken, the largest'being a salmon trout weighing about 26 lbs. The 
small-mouthed bass was introduced here a number of years ago and has proven 
a great success. It has not* only furnished splendid sport within the park, but has 
stocked the waters for a distance of a hundred miles tributary to the Madawaska 
river. Bass are not native to these waters, but thrive wonderfully where introduced. 

The Park covers an area of some 2,741 square miles or 1,754,240 acres, in 
the district of Nipissing. It is a net-work of lakes and rivers, five important 
rivers taking their rise here. It is densely wooded with pine, maple, birch, beech, 
hemlock, spruce, etc. 

That the object in setting aside this territory as a game preserve and breeding 
cfround for wild life and a health and pleasure resort for the people of the 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 99 

Province has been attained, is beyond dispute. Thousands of visitors annually 
enjoy the attractions of this health-giving region. 

There are five hotels, all of which have been filled during the past season 
to their utmost capacity, and many visitors had to be refused for want of room. 
The largest hotel is the Highland Inn, situated on Cache Lake at Headquarters, 
which is owned and operated by the Grand Trunk Eailway Company. Here 
one hundred guests can be accommodated and many more in tents. In connec- 
tion with the Inn are two camps, Nominigan, situated on Smoke Lake some 
eight miles away, and Minising on Big Island Lake, ten miles distant. Each 
of these consists of one main lodge with large dining room and assembly hall, 
also a number of bedrooms, and several cottages that will each accommodate 
eight people, and supplied with bathrooms, open fire-places, etc. The sanitary 
arrangements are first class. Meals are served at the main lodge. Each of these 
camps can take care of some sixty people; they are reached by stage from Algon- 
quin Park station, or by canoe from Cache Lake and Joe Lake respectively. 
Hotel Algonquin at Joe Lake, some seven miles west of headquarters, is owned 
and operated by J. E. Colson. Here some fifty people can be accommodated, 
and as many more in well furnished tents. Mowat Lodge, owned and operated 
by J. S. Eraser, at Canoe Lake, is really a part of the old Gilmour headquarters, 
and can accommodate some twenty-five people. In connection with each of these 
places is a good outfitting store and boat and canoe liveries. The lakes most 
frequented by the tourist are kept stocked annually; this year we put in here 
something like one hundred thousand salmon trout fry, and as many small-mouthed 
bass from the Government hatcheries, also a car of matured bass. 

Game of all kinds is also very abundant. Otter, mink, marten and fisher 
are on the increase, while all our lakes, rivers and creeks are full of beaver, the 
annual increase of which runs into many thousands, the number taken out yearly 
being scarcely perceptible. I am glad to report that those sent to stock the waste 
lands of the townships of Lavant and Dalhousie have done welL James Park, 
of Maple Eidge Farm, writes they have had no trouble protecting them, as the 
residents take a lively interest in the matter, and there are- already several 
healthy colonies. Those, too, sent to Eondeau Provincial Park, in Kent County, 
have taken hold and have not only adapted themselves to the altered conditions, 
but on my visit there this fall, a friend many miles from the Park told me he 
knew of a colony who had built a dam and were making a home not far from 
his place. The fishermen also tell me they are frequently seen swimming in 
the Eau. 

It is certain with the war over there will be a big demand for live beaver 
for stocking purposes. The Board of Game Commissioners for the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania have asked for one hundred for the game preserves of that State. 
Some of these have been sent and they arrived in first-class condition, but owing 
to the late date at which the order was received, we will not be able to ship 
them all this fall. 

Deer and moose are increasing all over the Park, especially the deer, and 
they afford a great deal of pleasure to the tourists as they pass through our 
lakes and streams,' their tameness giving abundant evidence that they know they 
are protected. These animals overflow and stock the many hunting grounds 
surrounding the Park, thus keeping up the supply and thereby adding to the 
revenue of the Province in the hunting licenses sold. 



100 EEPOKT OF THE No. 3 

Wolves, I regret to say, are still very much in evidence and very bold, not- 
withstanding the large number killed each winter by our rangers. Of course 
the abundance of game in the Park is responsible for this. The wolf soon learns 
where food is most easily obtained. The men get a bounty of $20.00 for each 
wolf killed, the skins going to the Government and being worth as much or more 
than the bounty paid. 

We took out the usual amount of fur this year, which was sold by tender 
at the Parliament Buildings, bringing the substantial sum of $11,781.44. The 
fur is taken out by our regular rangers, the only extra cost being for traps. Fishing 
licenses were issued to the amount of $1,613.00, residents paying $3.00 and non- 
residents $5.00. We also collected $30.00 for guide's licenses. This does not 
include moneys paid direct to the Department. 

We have several large boys' school camps in the Park, where from thirty 
to fifty boys spend a healthful and in all ways a beneficial holiday. At Cache 
Lake we have a large girls' school camp under the able management of Miss 
F. L. Case, of Eochester, N".Y. Here sixty girls spend the summer holidays under 
careful teachers and are instructed in woodcraft, canoeing and swimming. The 
entire camp this year consisted of seventy-five people. There are also a number 
of cottages on this and Canoe Lake, held under a twenty-one year lease, paying 
under the old regulations $7.50 per year, and under the new $10.00. The school 
camps pay $75.00 a year.' The sum of $592.00 was collected here this year for 
rents, the hotels and some others paying direct to the Department. During the 
summer and fall hundreds of anglers and canoeing parties are scattered all over 
the Park tenting and canoeing from lake to lake. 

Our staff consists of thirty-five men and superintendent and one housekeeper 
at the rangers' quarters, whose husband takes care of the grounds, etc., at head- 
quarters and helps the lineman keep the phone line in order. The duty of our 
men during the trapping season is to patrol the beats under their charge in 
order to prevent illegal trapping. In general, two rangers travel together, having 
a stated section to look after in which they keep the portages cut out and the 
shelter houses in order. These shelters are usually a day's journey apart, and 
the practice is for the ranger to spend several days at each looking over adjacent 
territory. We have built seven new shelters this year, one in each of the follow- 
ing sections. Eagle Lake, South River, Opeongo, one near the boundary at 
Aylwin Lake and three along the Canadian ISTorthern Eailway. All these are 
good substantial buildings. Several of the other shelters have been re-roofed. 
This work is done by the rangers during the summer months. 

1 am especially glad to report no damage from fire during the past year. 
Several fires were started, but the rangers got them out before they had time to do 
any damage. The tank car was not called out at all this season. The telephone 
line was a great assistance to us in getting to fires promptly. 

A large quantity of wood for fuel was cut by the contractors and our staff 
during the past season as follows: By contractor C. McConkey, 622 cords, all of 
which is drawn out to the siding at Eainy Lake ready for shipment; by contractor 
Tvol, 4,785 cords, all delivered at Potter Lake siding ready for shipment : by 
Eandolph Macdonald Company, at Canoe Lake," 1.253 cords, drawn out to Canoe 
Lake siding and 409 cords left in the woods to be drawn out during the winter 
of 1920. Of the wood cut at this point, 15 cars have been shipped containing 
2391/^ cords. At Source Lake siding (M.P. 306) the Macdonald Company has 
drawn out 6,0161/2 cords and left 3,272^/2 cords in the woods yet to be drawn. 



191S-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 101 

Of this wood ^2 cars have been shipped out, representing 1,165% cords, making 
a total cut by the Macdonald Company of 10,951 cords, of which there remain at 
the siding and in the woods 9,545% cords. At headquarters we took out with our 
own men and some hired help 1,544 cords, 63 cars of which were shipped con- 
taining 1,00'3 cords, the balance, 541 cords, being drawn out to the sand pit 
siding ready for shipment. During the summer some of the staff were stationed 
at each of these points to guard against loss by fire. Water barrels were also 
placed along the line of railway; these our men kept full of water, our greatest 
danger being from passing trains. We did not, however, lose a single cord. 
I would strongly recommend that all this wood be disposed of during the coming 
winter. It is now in fine shape, but if left another season will deteriorate on 
account of dry rot, etc. That left in the woods should be drawn out on the 
first snow. 

Considerable work was done by our men at headquarters. The water system 
has been extended so that we have a hydrant convenient to all the buildings. 
The two houses and all the outbuildings were painted, and the year's wood and 
ice cut and put in. The telephone line too was kept in order. We had very 
little poaching. Fines were imposed to the amount of $150.00 after our men 
got back to their beats, but before that poachers took advantage of the fact that 
our men were away cutting wood. 

I should like very much to see a good public hall erected here. It could be 
done at comparatively little cost, our men doing the work during the summer 
months. Such a place is badly needed for holding court, and during most of the 
year we could have divine service, had we a place suitable, as several ministers spend 
a great deal of time here. It would be convenient for public meetings and 
lectures, holding poll and many other ways. The Government furnish large 
dancing pavilions in much less important places. We do not want anything for 
that purpose, but we do need a good hall badly. I trust you will give this matter 
favourable consideration. The principal expense would be for material. We have 
hundreds of visitors here from all over the globe, and I am confident such a 
l)nilding would be much appreciated. 

On the limits acquired by the Government from the Munn Lumber Company 
in the Park, there are many million feet of the choicest hardwood. This has 
now become valuable, and I would strongly recommend that some arrangement 
be made whereby the matured timber could be judiciously taken out and the 
Province get the benefit of the revenue. After timber matures there is no advantage 
in leaving it stand, as it soon becomes diseased and the younger timber becomes 
infected also. There is a very fine growth of young timber all tlirough the Park. 
The timber to be taken out would consist of birch, maple, beech, ash, elm in 
small quantities, and hemlock, spruce and balsam. A lot of this timber would be 
convenient to the mills at Whitney and Bel wood ; the remainder would best be 
manufactured by a portable mill. Or the whole could be sold to one party and mill 
moved as the timber was cut out. There is such a large territory of the finest 
liiirdwood, that it should be easy to dispose of it to good advantage. 

Yours very truly, 

(Sgd.) G. W. Bahtlett, 

Parli Superin t en de nt. 
JJonourahle G. Howard Ferguson, 

Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



102 EEPORT OF THE Ko. 3 



Appendix No. 38. 
QuETico Pkovincial Park, 
Superintendent's Eeport. 

Kawene P.O., October 31st, 1919. 

Honourable Sie^ — 1 beg to submit my report for the fiscal year ending 
October 31st, 1919. 

The staff consisted this year of ten rangers, and this I think is not enough 
to patrol the area properly. During the season the water has been exceptionally 
low, making canoeing much more difficult, and necessitating the cutting of many 
new portages and building of small dams. The Eva Lake narrows became so 
low that it precluded the passage of our barge with supplies, and to overcome 
this difficulty I had a dam built on the outlet which will hold the water at a 
normal level, thus preventing trouble in the future. 

Some small fires occurred in the Park this summer, but little damage was 
done, as they ran in old cuttings mostly, and were got under control before reaching 
timber of value. These fires were caused by lightning, except one which no doubt 
was due to a camp fire left burning, but we could not ascertain which of three 
parties was responsible. 

Influenza caused us much worry and trouble in the forepart of the season. 
Eanger Harry Mack contracted the disease, and died on Basswood Lake although 
he had every attention and the best medical aid available. 

Moose are very numerous and may be seen anywhere. Deer are also increas- 
ing rapidly. Very few moose calves have been seen this summer. This has been 
remarked by many in the vicinity, but is as yet unaccounted for. Beaver-dams 
may be found on nearly all lakes and rivers. Smaller fur-bearing animals are 
also increasing. Seven large timber wolves were brought in by my rangers last 
. winter for which they received bounty. ISTo doubt many more were killed although 
not found. These animals are terribly destructive on deer, especially in the 
spring when a crust forms on the snow. The carcasses of deer partially devoured 
are often seen, and at this time of the year the wolves seldom visit the carcass 
a second time, preferring to kill a fresh victim. 

Suitable men for rangers have been very hard to get this year, there being 
a great demand for bushmen in this section. The Shevlin-Clarke Co., of Fort 
Frances, are operating five lumber camps in the Park this season, mostly in the 
vicinity of Quetico and Beaverhouse Lakes. Their output will be about twenty 
millions. 

We have had two very heavy snow storms since October 21st, followed by 
cold weather, which stopped canoeing and blocked our trails with snow-laden 
trees. All my available men have been working to clear our telephone line and 
a trail to Kawene. 

I am preparing to take a quantity of beaver and other fur from the Park 
as instructed by you and expect a goodly catch. 

One hundred and ninety-five dollars have been collected for Fishing and 
Guides' Licenses this year, and no doubt many more tourists would visit here 
Avere it more easy of access to the railway. I have received some communications 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 103 

from officials of the C.N.R. Company regarding accommodation for tourists at 
Kawene station, but nothing definite has been proposed. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Hugh McDonald, 

Superintendent Quetico Pari'. 
Hon. George Howard Ferguson, 

]\linister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 39. 

Colonization and Immigration. 

To the Honourable G. Howard Ferguson, Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ontario: — 

SiR;, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the Bureau of 
Colonization for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1919: 

Number of letters received 9,381 

Number of letters sent out 7,781 

Literature dispatched includes — 

" A New Land Nearby " ' 

" Farming Opportunities in Ontario " 

" Hints to Settlers in Northern Ontario " 

" Ontario Handbook " '28,568 

" Greater Ontario " 

" Heaton's Opportunities in Ontario " 

" The Province of Ontario in the War " 

Ontario maps ' 7,177 

Railway certificates issued to settlers proceeding to Northern Ontario (in- 
cluding 821 adults and 50 children) 725 

The above figures, compared with those of last year, are indicative of the 
growing interest in Old and Northern Ontario, particularly the latter. Our new 
booklet, " Northern Ontario," was circulated extensively during the year, and we 
conducted our usual newspaper and magazine advertising, but apart from these 
mediums there has been an appreciable increase of enquiries from homeseekers 
and others, mainly from the Western Provinces, the U.S.A. and Great Britain. 

Our Northern Ontario exhibits at the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 
nnd the Central Canada Exhibition, Ottawa, proved greater features of attraction 
than ever before. Continuous streams of interested visitors called daily and our 
representatives dispensed information on the possibilities of the North in general. 
A free-to-all motion picture show exhibiting the industries of the North, such 
as agriculture, mining, lumbering, fishing, etc., also accompanying lectures by 
a representative gave the visitors, many of whom had but little knowledge of the 
vastness, resources or possibilities of this section of the Province, educative and 



104 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




Ontario Government Experimental Plot, Ground Hog River, Northern Ontario. 




Modern Barns and Silo, Northern Ontario. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 105 

interesting entertainments. After seeing the " movies '' and the products, an 
elderly farmer exclaimed, "Those roots, vegetables and grains are wonderful. 1 
really can hardly believe it." 

Now that the war is over, the outook in regard to immigration and coloniza- 
tion has been changed to a very marked degree. Through our office at 163 Strand, 
London, England, an energetic campaign is being carried on in the United 
Kingdom with a view to attracting British capital, farmers, farm labourers and 
domestic servants to our Province. There can be no doubt that considerable 
capital, as well as many settlers, will be the result of advertising, lectures, cor- 
respondence and personal interviews, as well as the distribution of thousands of 
pieces of literature, together with the " boosting " that our soldiers gave Ontario 
while abroad. Our Agent-General advises me that his office is besieged daily by 
intending settlers and that his staff are forced to work overtime distributing 
information. The work, of course, is confined mainly to securing farm labourers 
and domestic servants. For a good many years this office has proved of great use 
in connection with migration of people from Great Britain who desire to make 
new homes for themselves in Ontario. A very efficient organization has been 
perfected for assisting emigrants in their journey to Ontario. From time to 
time personally conducted parties are arranged, each under the care of an ex- 
perienced traveller. The first of these parties, since the beginning of the war, 
recently arrived, consisting of sixty-three domestics. These girls were as fine a 
type of womanhood as could be wished for, and all, I am sure, will prove their 
worth. 

During the coming year of reconstriiction this Bureau will undoubtedly be 
instrumental in playing no small part in the upbuilding of this, the banner 
Province of the Dominion. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

H. A. Maodonell, 



Toronto. October 31st, 1919. 



Director of Colonization. 



Appendix No. IfO. 

Eepoet of the Forestry Branch, 1919. 

Sir, — The report of the work of the Forestry Branch for the year ending 
Slst October, 1919, is given under the three sections of Forest Protection, Eeforest- 
ation and Forest Pathology. 

I. Forest Protection. ' 
(1) Legislation. 

The past season is the third during which this Branch has been charged 
with the work relating to The Forest Fires Prevention Act of 1917. No changes 
have been made in the Act since the last annual report, but this season's experience 

8 r.M. 



106 



EEPOKT OF THE 



No. 3 




Twenty-five Cords of Pulpwood, Northern Ontario. 




Trophies of the Deer Hunt, Northern Ontario. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



lor 



indicates that amendments in two directions are desirable. In some instances 
this summer it was found that local labour could not be engaged to fight fire no 
matter what wage was offered, and such cases should be provided for in the Act 
by a compulsory clause. Most modern forest fire legislation contains such a pro- 
vision. A further amendment is needed to cover deliberate defiance of the Permit 
Regulations. At present infringements can be punished by a fine only, and this 
becomes merely nominal, in fact cheap land clearing, under certain conditions. 
Accordingly the power of imprisonment should exist in the Act to st-rve as suffi- 
cient deterrent. 



(2) Organization and Personnel. 

For administrative purposes the forest region of Ontario i& divided into four 
inspectorates, as follows: 

(1) Western Inspectorate — Rainy River, Kenora, Thunder Bay. 

(2) Northern Inspectorate — Timiskaming (exclusive of Timagami), Clay Belt 
area in northern Algoma. 

(3) Central Inspectorate — Algoma, Sudbury, eastern Timagami, northern 
Nipissing. 

(4) Southern Inspectorate — South of French and Mattawa Rivers. 

The above territory was handled as 30 ranger districts with a field force 
composed of: 1 Superintendent, 4 Inspectors, 30 Chief Rangers, 49 Deputy Chief 
Rangers, 1,014 Rangers (during peak of season). 

The fire season opened late, the weather being comparatively wet, so that 
men went on duty slowly. In April, a small force was engaged in getting equip- 
ment ready and the work as a whole organized. On May 1, there were 152 on the 
pay lists, and this number was slowly increased so that by the middle of May 
one-half of the staff were on duty, and by the end of the month the force numbered 
900. This represented a considerable saving as compared with May of last year. 
During the critical months of June, July, and August the staff averaged 1,014 men 
daily. With September the weather once more became favourable, and the field 
force was gradually reduced, being down to half strength by the 18th, and number- 
ing 126 by September 30. A small number was kept on at work into October to 
overhaul and store equipment. 

The average daily force was: During April, 26; May, 548; June, 1,007; 
July, 1,025; August, 1,009; September, 611; October, 29. The total number 
of persons employed for at least a part of the season was 1,338; of these, 276 
resigned after a time, and 51 were dismissed for various reasons. 

The expenditure for the fiscal year was as follows, the figures for 1918 
(rounded off) being given for comparison. 

CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURE, 1919 



1919 



1918 



1919 



1918 



I $ c. 

Pay roll 405,212 30 

Equipment 22,899 02 

Expendable property... 13,903 06 
Travel (Inspection). . . . 15,826 37 
Improvement work i 4, 765 35 



$ c. 

416,500 00 

28,350 00 

10.700 00 

13,440 00 

4,280 00 



Extra fire fighting . . . 
Express, postage, etc. 
Miscellany 



Total. 



$ c. 

53,863 92 

5,646 47 

5.955 02 



$ c. 
1,445 00 
5,365 00 



528,071 51 



480,080 00 



108 EEPOET OP THE No. 3 

Against this total stands the fire tax collected from licensees. Geographically 
the expenditure was approximately, thus : — 

Central Inspectorate 41 % 

Western Inspectorate 22 % 

Northern Inspectorate 21 % 

Southern Inspectorate 16 % 



100% 



(3) Fires. 

• The summer of 1919 was characterized by an unusually prolonged drought, 
and the fire season was a bad one. The early part of May was wet, but after 
that came three months which were abnormally dry. Under such conditions fires 
became more numerous than usual, and also assumed much larger proportions. 
This is seen in the number of fires reported for June, July and August — 414, 613, 
and 377 fires respectively — as against 296, 141 and 193, the average for 1918 and 
1917. 

The situation became serious first in the Clay Belt region. From the settlers' 
point of view this season was more satisfactory than either 1918 or 1917 for land 
clearing operations, because conditions were favourable to a " good burn." From 
the nature of things the activity in land clearing increases as the weather, con- 
ditions develop which render it more dangerous. Thus, almost as many permits 
were issued in the first half of June as were granted during the whole of that 
month last year. It must be kept in mind that the welfare of such new agri- 
cultural settlements is bound up with land clearing by fire, and it is necessary 
to adopt a considerable latitude of risk in order not to hamper pioneer farming 
operations unduly. In an average year one counts on occasional showers which 
help to extinguish the dying fires which are seldom absolutely out when the permit 
expires. But this season it was otherwise. The situation developed rapidly, for 
some 4,300 fires had been set out under permit, a large percentage of which had 
not died out after the ordinary way. By June 21, existing permits had been 
cancelled and the issuance of new ones stopped. No rain fell, however, till the 
early part of August. The result was that old, clearing fires gradually enlarged 
and met, and that sparks from these set fresh areas of slash on fire. Added to 
these, of course, was a larger number than usual due to railways, campers, etc. 
The situation was enlarged by certain persons taking advantage of the existing 
confusion to defy the permit suspension order. In fact, the number of fires 
reported from the Northern Inspectorate, despite the small area, reached almost 
one-quarter of the number for the Province. The situation was aggressively faced 
and fires fought vigorously everywhere. The long drought, however, made water 
scarce in many regions, aiul even the peaty soil turned up in trenching around 
fires at last became a case of merely adding more fuel. Considerable loss in build- 
ings and crops occurred, but no loss of life. There is no doubt that the permit 
system in enabling control of setting out fire averted a more serious result. 

The total area reported burned over in .the Northern division was 58,383 
acres or 6.3 per cent, of the whole for the Province. Considerable of this acreage 
had been previously l)urned in 1'916 and 1911. The largest fires were in th^ 
Cochrane and Timmins ranger districts. Among the townships suffering most were 
O'Brien, Shackleton, Calder, Leitch, Blount, Clute, Lamarche, Brower, Fox, New- 
market, Dundonald, Matheson, Bristol, Ogden, Mountjoy and Tisdale. In the 



1919-20 DEPABTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 109 

Matheson ranger district the townships of Clergue, Carr, Playfair and Pacaud 
had considerable fire. 

But while much damage was done in the Northern Inspectorate it was rela- 
tively insignificant when one turns to a consideration of the fire record in the 
Central Inspectorate. The fires in the north were largely on lands being cleared 
or which will eventually be cleared for farming purposes. From the one stand- 
point of the timber supply of the Province they are of less concern than in the 
case of those regions which are to remain centres of timber production. The 
Central Inspectorate embraces roughly the middle portion of the white pine belt 
in Ontario, and little of the soil is suited to agricultural pursuits. Fire in this 
region means not only the loss of standing timber, but also the growing crop for 
future logging. 

In this inspectorate the area reported burned over totalled 618,496 acres. 
The largest fires occurred in the Chapleau, Sudbury, Webb wood and Soo Eanger 
Districts. In the strip of country between Lake Nipissing and Sault Ste. Marie, 
lying south of the Mississagi forest reserve, approximately 523,000 acres were 
reported burned over — in other words, around 13 per cent, of this region. Large 
general fires occurred in the townships of Curtis, Gillmor, McMahon, Morin, 201, 
195, Bridgland, Wells, Grassett, 182, 175, 169, 168, 167, Mack, Striker, 145, 144, 
143, Proctor, 132, 131, 130, 129, 120, Bigelow, Dunlop, jVIerritt, Craig, Moncrieff, 
Totten, Cascaden, Trill, Dowling, Foster, 91, 90, 83, 82, 10, Blezard, Neelon, Dill, 
Dryden, Cleland, Burwash, Street, Hawley, Hagar, Appelby, Latchford, Bertram. 
In quite a number of cases whole townships were swept over. 

The Western and Southern Inspectorates also suffered severely — to the extent 
of 181,458 acres and 63,824 acres, respectively. In the former, the Nipigon, Kainy 
River and Thunder Bay districts suffered most; and in the latter, Muskoka and 
Parry Sound. 

The total area reported burned over in the Province in 1919 was 922,161 
acres, or 1,441 square miles. It is hard to realize what such an area is, but a 
conception may be formed by trying to visualize a strip of country six miles wide 
from Toronto to North Bay. 

No complete estimates of the loss are available. Included in the total burned 
area are 247,266 acres of land classed as timbered, mostly with white pine. At 
the extremely low estimate of 1,000 feet per acre, this would mean as much timber 
as the Province received dues on last year. Of course, some of the damaged 
timber will be salvaged. Heavy losses were also sustained by lumber concerns by 
the burning of camps, logging equipment, supplies and sawmills. These losses, 
of course, must ultimately be passed on to the consumer. 

In addition, there were burned over 251,355 acres classed as " logged over 
with some timber left," and 233,196 acres of young growth; in other words, 
around 485,000 acres of cut-over lands. The loss here is very high because it 
means the wiping out of a large potential crop without any salvage. To put that 
crop back artificially by planting would take at least $5,000,000, to say nothing 
of the loss in time as represented in the age of the burned stands of young trees. 

Before going into a discussion of the situation presented above it may bo 
well to point out that forest protection in Ontario has three distinct phases. In 
the Clay Belt country the yearly expenditure is proportionately high because of 
the permit system and the scattered nature of this work. It is not justifiable on 
timber account alone, because most of the region will not be kept as a permanent 
timl)er area, l)ut will pass to farming, A part of the cost of protection in this 



110 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



district is chargeable to making life and property in general safe. Another phase 
appears in connection with land under license; here the lumberman's timber must 
be protected because he pays a fire tax, while the Crown is further interested in 
the unmerchantable young growth on the limit. The third phase is to be found 
in the immense area of cut-over land, largely reverted to the Crown. Protection 
of this is necessary if we are to have any timber from which to derive revenue in 
the future. In fact, expenditure on this account is more justifiable than for 
unlicensed timber, because it is usually possible in case of fire damage to arrange 
for logging the latter at once. Adequate protection of cut-over lands is expensive, 
because they are acreages of the highest hazard owing to the logging slash. For 
the same reason the fires are extremely hot and resulting damage to the young 
trees is high. The only definite information that we have regarding the effect 
of repeated forest fires upon the restocking of pine lands in Ontario is derived 
from a report on a study, a few years ago, of 85,000 acres in the southern part 
of the pinery. This study showed that the numbers of young pine trees one 
inch and above in diameter surviving after fire were as, 110, 14, 7 and 3 trees per 
acre, according as the area was burned severely, once, twice, three or many times. 
These figures demonstrate the great damage done by fire to cut-over lands. As 
already pointed out, some 485,000 acres of such lands were burned over this 
season. Protection of this type of forest land is by far the cheapest method of 
producing forests, even if general tree planting were within the financial ability 
of the Province. 

Classification of Forest Fires, 1919. 











1917- 






1917- 


By Month 


1919 


By Origin 


1919 


1918 
aver- 
age 


By Size 


1919 


1918 
aver- 
age 



May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 



No. 
36? 
414 
613 
377 
14 



1780 



Settlers 

Campers 

Railways 

Lightning 

Logging operations 
Miscellaneous. . .. 
Unknown 



No. 


% 


% 


137 


1.1 


8.2 


163 


9.2 


11.2 


659 


37.0 


48.0 


54 


3.0 


3.3 


44 


2.5 


4.1 


76 


4.3 


4.1 


647 


36.3 


20.5 


1780 


100.0 


100.0 



\ ae. and under. . 

Over J to 5 ae. . . 

Over 5 to 10 ac . . 

Over 10 to 100 ac 

Over 100 to 500 ac 

Over 500 ac: 

500-1,000 

1,000 to 10,000 
Over 10,000... 



No. 


% 


543 


30. f 


493 


27.7 


109 


6.1 


293 


16.5 


155 


8.7 


58 


3.3 


105 


5.9 


24 


1.3 


1780 


100.0 



% 

38.4 
26.6 

5.4 
11.6 

4.9 
13.1 



100.0 



Railway Fires. — Of the fires occurring along railway lines, 659 fires werci 
attributed to railway origin, either defective locomotives or employee carelessness. 
This was 37 per cent, of the total number of fires reported for the season, a gratify- 
ing improvement over the record for 1918 and 1917. But, as the table of loco- 
motive inspections farther on shows, there is opportunity for better results yet, 
since there is no reason why all companies cannot reach the standard of the best: 
one in this respect. > 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



Ill 



Fires of Railway Oeigin_, 1919. 



Railway 


Mileage 
forest 
section 


No. of fires 


Per cent of 
railway fires 


C.N.R. (exclusive of Transcontinental) 


1,455 
950 

1,430 

253 

375 

330 

95 


162 

171 

173 

118 

23 

10 

2 


24.6 


C.N.R. (Transcontinental) 


25.9 


C.P.R 


26.3 


T. & N.O 


17.9 


G.T.R 

A.C. & H.B 


3.5 
1.5 


A.E 


0.3 








4,888 


659 


100.0 



Other Causes. — The tourist, surveyor, prospector, fisherman, berry picker, 
picnicker, etc., were responsible for 9.2 per cent, of the total fires. Settlers caused 
7.7 per cent, of the fires. In all, 23 persons were prosecuted for violations of the 
Permit Regulations, and convictions secured in 20 cases. The percentic increase in 
fires whose origin was not determined is a direct result of the general fire condi- 
tions of this season. 

Area Burned. — Thirty per cent, of all fires did not exceed one-quarter acre in 
size, and nearly 60 per cent, of them did not get beyond 5 acres in extent. The 
corresponding figures for last year were 40 and 75 per cent, respectively. Over 
10 per cent, of the fires exceeded 500 acres. 

The total area reported burned over was 932,161 acres, classified thus: — 

Timber Jand 2i'7,T)6 acres (26.8%) 

Cut-overland (with some timber left) 251,855 " (27.3%) 

Young growth (below 6 inches diameter) 233,196 " (25.3%) 

Barren and grass land 190,344 " (20.6%) 

922,161 acres 100. O^c 



113 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



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1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



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114 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



(4) Permits. 

Forest protection in a considerable portion of the northern Clay Belt is 
largely effected through control of land clearing fires by the permit system. This 
system is costly, since a large force of rangers is required owing to the scattered 
nature of the work. Permits were issued in 136 townships. This is not such 
a large area if the work were consolidated, but scattered townships require the 
same number of men to issue permits whether the number used in a season be 
large or small. For instance, there were 80 townships in which not over 25 
permits per township were issued in the whole season ; and there were only 25 
townships in which more than 100 permits each were called for. As time goes 
on, however, and a township becomes more cleared and mostly patented, there 
seems no reason why the municipality should not be called upon to provide for 
the protection of its own property. 

The number of permits issued the past season was relatively small since the 
weather and fire conditions led to the general suspension of permits from June 21 
until into August. During that period permits were issued only in a few localities 
where conditions made it safe. In all, 6,635 permits to burn over 26,790 acres 
were issued, as compared with 9,590 permits in 1918, and 3,486 in 1917. 



Statement of Permits, 1919. 



Ranger District 


Number of Permits 


Area Burned Over 




1919 


1918 


1919 




2.275 

1,691 

1,557 

702 

199 

211 


3,493 

2,346 

2,179 

514 

651 

407 


5,437 acres 




4,760 •' 




13,521 




1,379 " 




925 " 


T?pTnQiTiiTixy 1 1 districts 


768 " 








6,635 


9,590 


26,790 acres 



Monthly Summary of Permits, 1919. 



Month 


Number 


Area 1919 




1919 


1918 




]yia,y 


1,536 
2,786 

496 
1,475 

342 


2,248 
2,899 
2,050 
2,156 
237 


5,636 acres 




12,607 " 


July 


2.197 " 




5,333 " 




1,017 " 








6,635 


9,590 


26,790 acres 



For infractions of the Permit Regulations 23 persons were prosecuted, and 
convictions secured in 20 cases. As already pointed out, it is desirable that the 
Act be amended to allow a jail sentence in flagrant cases. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 115 



(5) Improvement Work. 

The character of the fire season permitted very little attention to new pro- 
jects along the lines of improvement work. Time was found for very little tele- 
phone, trail or cabin construction. The new headquarters buildings for the 
Nipigon reserve were completed, an equipment storehouse built at Fort Frances, 
and a combined storehouse and boathouse at Kenora. 

(6) Equipment. 

With the opening of this season steps were taken to have all equipment, such 
as canoes, railway velocipedes, etc., and buildings painted the same colour and 
after a uniform pattern. Also all equipment was stencilled " Ontario Forestry 
Branch,^' and branded or stamped " 0. F. B." with steel letters. In addition, 
all main articles of equipment such as canoes, boats, railway velocipedes, railway 
motor cars, tents, etc., were numbered on a definite system, to facilitate keeping 
records and to learn the life of different manufacturers' goods. 

The major equipment added this year included: fifty canoes, seven large 
power boats, eighty tents, four hundred pairs of blankets, forty-five railway veloci- 
pedes, three railway motor cars. 

The total equipment necessary for such a large organization requires the 
maintenance of about $100,000 of stock. The Branch now has 10 Ford auto 
trucks, 10 power cruisers (30 feet and over), 6 smaller power boats, 400 canoes 
and small boats, 65 railway velocipedes, 8 railway motor cars, 430 tents, 2,000 
pairs of blankets, 5 portable fire pumps with 7,700 feet of hose, besides very large 
numbers of camp stoves, axes, shovels, tools, cooking utensils, etc. There is still 
a shortage in spare equipment which should be on hand for emergency crews of 
fire fighters. 

It may be in order to point out that provision for storage of such a large 
equipment calls for much space. Considerable warehouse space is rented yearly, 
but the following storehouses have been erected during the past three seasons : 
Gowganda, Gogama, Bisco, Cochrane, Nipigon, Fort Frances, Kenora. In addition 
to the above seven main storehouses, a number of boathouses, railway motor car 
houses, truck garages, hose houses, etc., have been built. 

In addition to the usual quantity of fire signs, 12,000 calendars and 10,000 
pencils with 10,000 rulers were sent out for educational effect. The calendars 
were of two types, one specially designed for distribution in the Clay Belt, and 
the other for tourist country. The pencils and rulers bearing appropriate fire 
warnings were placed in all the northern schools. 

(7) Railway Inspection Under B. R. C. 

Two inspectors devoted their whole time to the inspection of fire protective 
appliances on locomotives, because of the large percentage of fires of railway orijjin. 
Tbe railway mileage through forest section in Ontario is very great, approximately 
5,000 miles, and more locomotive inspections are made in this Province than in 
the other provinces of Canada combined. A change wa^; made for the past season 
in the basis of payment for inspection, with the result that 10 per cent, more 
inspections than in 1918 were made in 80 per cent, of the time, so that the average 
cost per inspection fell to $2.07 as compared with $2.59 in 1918. 



116 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Locomotive Inspection, 1919. 



Railway 



Number Inspected 



Times 



3 4 



Total 

Number 

Locomotives 



Total Number 
Inspections 



1919 1918 1917 



Inspec- 
tions 
Showing 
Defects 



1919 



Percentage Defective 



1919 1918 1917 



C.P.R 


114 


96 


48 


11 


1 


C.N.R 


78 


47 


30 


10 


3 


G.T.R 


80 


28 


5 


1 




A.C 


7 


8 
1 








A.E 


1 


2 


1 









270 

167 

114 

15 

5 



571 



499 


448 


328 


149 


29.9 


36.4 


317 


232 


154 


49 


15.5 


22.4 


155 


184 


60 


17 


11.0 


28.3 


23 


36 


37 


3 


13.0 


38.8 


18 


20 


36 


3 


16.7 


70.0 
32.1 


1,012 


920 


615 


221 


21.8 



19.5 
39.6 
20.0 
45.9 
55.5 

28.3 



Average cost per inspection $2.07 (as compared with $2.59 for 1918) 



In all, 1,012 inspections were made of 571 locomotives, and of these, 221 
inspections or about one in five showed fire protective appliances defective in one 
respect or another. This is a decided improvement over the years 1917 and 1918 
for which the average was 30 per cent, defective. Further, the record for this 
year would have been very much better if the C.P.R. had kept its engines up to the 
standard of the other roads. C.P.E. locomotives were defective to the extent 
of almost 30 per cent., and in 1918 it was 36.4 per cent. If one road can keep 
its defective locomotives down to 11 per cent, of inspections, it should be possible 
for all other roads to reach the same record; the matter is entirely one of organiza- 
tion. This matter is of extreme importance in Ontario because of the large 
number of fires of r.:ilway origin. 

Because of the unsatisfactory results in past seasons with special patrolmen 
put on by the C.N.R. between Pembroke and Nipigon as a Board requirement, this 
year it was arranged that the Forestry Branch take over the work, the company 
paying part cost. The arrangement has been justified by the relatively low fire 
damage along the C.N.E. this season. 

Thirty-six inspections of locomotives on private lines used in logging, etc., 
were made and the owners required to be brought up to the equivalent of B. E. C. 
specifications under authority of the Provincial Act. 

(8) Summary. 

The disastrous fire season we have experienced calls for a close examination. 
The season was undoubtedly a difficult one for fire control, but this Branch feels 
that such a record is below the attainable ; certainly it is below the average of 
several organizations protecting forest areas of similar magnitude. 

As to origin of fires, a study of our statistics for the last three years shows 
a general uniformity. Apparently we may expect the following situation as 
regards causes : 

About 8 per cent due to la-nd clearing 



10 

3 

3 

5 

45 

26 



neglected camp fires 
lightning 
summer logging 
other known causes 
railways 
unknown causes 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 117 

A reduction in the number of fires traceable to carelessness in land clearing 
and as regards camp fires will be a matter of slow education. Lightning fires 
as a rule do not reach large proportions. While fires caused in summer logging 
show a small percentage, these fires are frequently very costly. To reach the 
camps in operation it is necessary to pass over tote roads which are frequently piled 
up with slash from the previous season's operation. The question of general 
slash disposal should be considered, but in the meantime regulations should be 
adopted requiring the disposal of slash along main tote roads, about camps and 
dump grounds. Summer operators should also be required to give special assist- 
ance in fire patrol during dangerous periods. 

The machinery for reducing railway fires exists. Various protective measures 
are required of the railways such as special patrol, clearing the right-of-way and 
keeping up proper protective appliances in locomotives, yet within a few feet of 
the right-of-way timber operators are allowed to create fire hazards which make 
fire prevention almost impossible when small grass fires get away from the right- 
of-way. Again, slash disposal within reasonable distance of railways is imperative 
if the problem is to be solved. Accordingly, we conclude that the problem is one 
of eliminating the causes as much as possible and then controlling fires which 
do get a start. 

The public as a whole seem very slow to realize that forest fire protection 
differs in no way from general property fire protection as provided for in cities. 
The same principles underlie both — reduction of inflammable hazard, familiarity 
with conditions in all parts of the area under protection, early detection and speed 
in reaching the scene of the fire, and fighting by men specially trained for that 
work. Applying these in turn to forest property, we note that the hazard must 
remain high till the operation of logging carries with it as an integral part the 
disposal of the slash nuisance it creates. Early detection and early fighting is a 
matter of lookout towers, telephone systems, and strategic systems of roads and 
trails; while fighting forest fires is no more the work of an amateur than fighting 
city fires. 

These considerations lead to the argument that forest protection calls for 
specially qualified men. The direction of the protective work in any district 
must be in the hands of a man who knows the basic principles of fire protection; 
who will make it his business to become thoroughly familiar with conditions of 
timber, hazard, settlement, etc., in every part of his district; who is capable of 
planning and constructing a system of lookout towers, telephone lines, roads, trails, 
etc., so as to make his district relatively safe at the least cost. Along with these, 
he must be able to follow instructions, to give an intelligent report on any field 
matter, to estimate burned timber, to administer the forest laws, Railway Act, etc. 
In short, he must have been previously trained in the principles and work of 
forest protection. 

Turning to the existing system in Ontario, we find that each spring a tem- 
porary organization of around 1,000 men is built up, only to be disbanded every 
fall. During the last three seasons about one-half the ranger force has been new, 
inexperienced men each year. Any protection system must depend upon a per- 
manent skeleton organization for efficiency. Moreover, this skeleton force must 
be made up of men with capabilities of the order outlined in the preceding para- 
graph. This is impossible if appointments are made on any other basis than the 
applicant's fitness for the work. 



118 EEPOKT OF THE No. 3 

Forest fire control in Ontario will be at a standstill until it is recognized: 

(1) That forest protection is a specialized business requiring a permanent 
trained organization, and 

(2) That no organization can give efficient service without the adoption of 
the merit system in making appointments and promotions. 

II. Eeforestation. 

Reforestation is a term which is used in Ontario, in rather a loose way, with 
various meanings. Eeforestation is frequently spoken of in a broad way to mean 
the regulation of timber operations to protect the young or second growth; that is, 
securing a new crop by leaving parent seed trees or undersized young growth 
which will eventually develop a future harvest. This may be spoken of as natural 
reforestation to distinguish it from artificial reforestation where a new crop is 
secured by planting either seed or young plants. 

Ontario presents two distinct problems in regard to reforestation: 

The securing of continuous wood crops on the Crown lands of the Laurentian 
plateau which comprise at least fifty million acres of northern Ontario. 

The reforesting of the larger waste areas and assisting and encouraging the 
private waste land and woodland owner of southern Ontario. 

The writer believes that artificial reforestation in the Laurentian plateau of 
the north is not feasible at present, although many districts within this region are 
at present almost destitute of the more valuable species such as pine and spruce. 
Before any consideration can be given this problem we must secure some assurance 
of reasonable protection for this area. Owing to . the excessive cost of artificial 
reforesting we must do everything possible to regulate timber operations so that 
natural reproduction will be given some chance to insure future crops. During 
this last season we have had whole townships swept over with fire. To re-stock 
a thirty-six square mile township with pine or spruce would cost at least $100,000.00. 
Our first problem in the forest regions of the Laurentian plateau is to secure 
a forest organization which will give adequate fire protection and regulation of 
cutting in order to insure natural re-stocking. 

Turning to the problem in southern Ontario, where the land has largely left 
the Crown, we find that there exists only about 9 per cent, of woodland of inferior 
quality with many townships having less than 5 per cent. 

In addition to the inferior wood lots and smaller waste areas of the farm, 
there exist throughout older Ontario many large areas of waste land almost devoid 
of tree growth, and in many cases composed of blowing sand. 

While the industries of southern Ontario must largely depend upon the north 
for timber supplies, yet it is imperative that an effort be made to reforest these 
local waste areas if we are to secure a future wood supply. The writer believes 
that this problem can best be solved by the creation of demonstration forest stations 
throughout older Ontario similar to that now established in Norfolk county. 
These stations will not only reclaim waste lands but will supply planting material 
to private owners and will be a local demonstration of reforestation. 

At the provincial forest station in Norfolk County we have about three 
hundred acres of forest plantations in various stages. These plantations are thriv- 
ing and have become splendid demonstrations of what may be expected from work 
of this kind. The influence of this work is demonstrated in the fact that a large 
number of private owners in this district have taken advantage of the government 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 119 

distribution of trees and have made sonie very good plantations on Avaste portions 
of their farms. 

This last autumn a three-acre mixed hardwood plantation was made with the 
intention of experimenting on the relative values of the various hardwoods in 
artificial reforesting. 

During the past season about forty thousand trees were shipped out to private 
planters. This is far below our pre-war output as our distribution at one time 
had reached about half a million trees. We have had difficulty in securing reliable 
seed of the kind of trees desired in connection with this work and it will take at 
least two years to reach a reasonable supply of nursery stock. 

The work at this station, which has been held up during the war, should now 
be placed on a better basis. This will require improvements in buildings, a better 
watering system, more seed bed areas, in fact, a general enlargement of the plant 
if the growing requirements for trees are to be met. 

The following is an approximate list of the nursery stock at the Provincial 
Forest Station in Norfolk County: 

Scotch Pine seedlings 600,000 

Scotch Pine transplants 40, 000 

White Pine transplants 30,000 

Larch seedlings 50,000 

Larch transplants 40, 000 

Miscellaneous conifers, as red pine, jack pine, cedar, etc 80,000 

Miscellaneous hardwoods, as elm, sugar maple, white ash, black 

walnut, etc 100,000 

In addition to the above stock, fifty bushels each, of red acorns and black 
^walnut were collected and planted this autumn. 

Hi. Forest Pathology. 

The work in connection with tree diseases has been chiefly confined to the 
eradication of Ribes (currants and gooseberries) at the forest station in Norfolk 
land the investigations of Dr. Faull into diseases affecting trees in the Timagami 
region. 

As indicated last year the general eradication of diseased Eibes cannot be 
carried out on a large scale throughout Ontario, but our efforts should be directed 
towards local control wherever white pine values warrant the expenditure. The 
work of eradication is being carried on at the Provincial Forest Station in Norfolk 
County. About 500 acres have been cleared of Ribes and it is expected that white 
pine can be grown at this station with little danger of infection. Last year the 
Department inaugurated work of investigation into the diseased condition of pine 
in the Timagami region. This work was continued this season and I am glad to 
report that valuable information has been obtained in respect to the " needle 
blight " which has become so prevalent in parts of Ontario. A report upon this 
work follows : 

Report of Dr. J. H. Faull for 1919. 

Sulphur Fumes. 

In the last week of May a trip was made into Cleland Township in the 
District of Sudbury for the purpose of observing the effects on the coniferous 
forest of sulphur fumes from winter roast beds located from four to six miles 
distant. The same area had been visited the preceding September in order to 



i:eO EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

check over conditions with respect to the needle blight of white pine — of which at 
that time there was little trace. Notes were made then on individual serially 
marked trees with healthy new leaves for reference the following spring. The 
forest as a whole was found to be in a much better condition than in the spring of 
1918, the date of my first inspection. None of the marked trees had undergone 
any visible change, their foliage looking apparently as green as in the foregoing 
autumn. It was reported that roasting had not been begun until after the winter 
had set in, and had been discontinued before the oncoming of spring thaws. It 
seems not improbable that where damage has resulted in the past, it has been 
at temperatures above that of the freezing point. Strangely enough, there appears 
to be no definite information in the literature based on experiments with respect 
to the susceptibility of white pine and others of our native conifers to sulphur 
fume injuries at the lower temperatures. 

"Needle Blight" of White Pine. 

Considerable attention was given during the summer to '' needle blight " or 
" leaf blight " of the white pine, concerning which so many inquiries have been 
made by lumbermen through your office, in continuation of observations instituted 
in 1918. Throughout I was accompanied by Mr. A. W. McCallum, M.A., B.Sc.F., 
who was sent up as an observer by the Federal Government. 

The " needle blight " is most abundant in the northern parts of the Province, 
but it also occurs in various other parts of Ontario, and in Quebec. Judging from 
inquiries received, it has widely attracted the attention of owners of white pine 
and has been the cause of some alarm. Reports of its occurrences and specimens 
have been sent in from Norfolk County, Barrie, Toronto, Ottawa, Nipissing Dis- 
trict and elsewhere. The general situation, however, is better than in 1918. 

The blight appeared this year in the latter half of June, just after the young 
needles were beginning to grow out, and as has been formerly observed was 
restricted to the new growth. The sequence of events was identical with the 
developments of 1918, although the blight developed almost a month earlier this 
year than last as there was a difi'erence of about four weeks in the two seasons 
between the times of leafing. The new needles, usually on all parts of the tree, 
soon after they have emerged from the bud turn lighter in colour at the tips and 
then redden from their tips downwards. This process goes on for two weeks or 
more, the needles meanwhile growing in length from their bases; the resultant 
discoloration involves from a quarter to three-quarters, more or less, of each of 
the affected leaves. There is a remarkable uniformity in the extent of the dis- 
coloration in each tuft and each branch. No causal agent is evident in the diseased 
needles. 

At first sight it appeared as though the blight was as severe as last year. In 
the Timagami Forest Reserve, where some hundreds of trees had been serially 
marked with metal tags or otherwise located, the frequency of blighted trees in 
some parts appeared to be undiminished. Thus standing on the observation tower 
at Bear Island and looking over miles of country all about, it was not possible 
to decide that there had been any marked amelioration. Everywhere there were 
scattered the bright reddened trees among the normal sombre conifers. A careful 
review was then made of the ground prepared the preceding summer. 

Beginning with Rondeau Park on Lake Erie, four blighted white pines had 
been found there in 1918 — no others were discovered. Mr. Geo. Coldworthv. the 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 131 

'Chief Ranger, who had accompanied me when these trees had been located, covered 
tOur course again in August and forwarded a report, backed up by specimens, 
[showing that the same four trees were again badly blighted, and one other in the 
[game neighbourhood. 

Turning to the Timagami Forest Reserve, where in some areas a large per- 
[centage of the trees of all ages had shown the blight in 1918, and where extensive 
observations had been made, the results afford surer ground for the conclusions 
; arrived at. The trees examined fall into three general classes — young trees . with 
[trunks up to 3 or 4 inches in diameter; large trees, many of them mature, with 
trunks 10 inches and upwards, and those that lie between. In the first instance 
it was found that there had been a general recovery. Thus on Island No. 976 
where 75 per cent, or more had been affected in a count of all the young white 
pines on the eastern half of the island — a total of 400 trees, not more than 10 per 
cent, displayed blight this year. Those of the middle class exhibited greater 
variation. Some were again severely blighted, while others showed no signs of 
blight, and between these two conditions there were all grades. Almost invariably 
the recovered trees of this size were clothed with abnormally short needles, and 
often the foliage was scantier and paler than in healthy trees. The large trees, 
however, showed less than 1 per cent, recovery, and there was a mortality of about 
5 per cent. Likewise there were scattered cases in this class of trees of what 
appeared to be new instances of blight; at all events, some vividly blighted trees 
were numbered for the first time that had been passed by in 1918 — probably 
because of uncertainty as to their condition at that time. 

A renewed effort has been made to discover the cause of " needle blight." 
As there are no causal organisms to be detected in the affected crowns, several 
hundred inoculations were carried out on healthy twigs of healthy trees with the 
juice from diseased foliage. Certain so-called physiological diseases are known 
to be contagious and such disorders have been communicated in this way. No 
results followed. The season before interlocking diseased and healthy branches 
of contiguous trees had been grafted at the point of contact. An examination 
showed that the branches had formed an organic union but that the virus, if there 
be one, had not been transmitted. The bark was then carefully examined through- 
out the entire extent of trunk and roots of diseased trees, and then stripped and 
the exposed wood examined. No indications of disease were manifest. The first 
signs of organic trouble were discovered in the root tips. 

An examination of root tips of trees is an arduous business. Two methods 
were followed. First, the root system of a six inch blighted tree was exposed 
by carefully following the main roots outward from the base of the trunk care- 
fully disentangling the branches and picking away the adhering soil and vegetation. 
Secondly, several isolated small blighted trees with trunks one to three inches in 
diameter were removed in their entirety from the shallow rock sub-soil character- 
istic of that region, and a number of healthy trees of similar size as checks. The 
root systems of these trees were carefully washed free from soil by vigorous im- 
mersion in water. A study of the cleaned roots located the seat of the trouble. 
The roots of the check trees were normal, the root tips were white, frequent and 
vigorous. By contrast the tips of the main branches of the root system of the 
diseased trees were almost invariably killed back from 4 to 12 inches or more. 
Some of the smaller lateral branches were not so clearly dead, but few appeared 
in good condition, and not one healthy main root tip was uncovered in the entire 
lot. It was at once apparent that the absorbing areas of the root system had 



122 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

been destroyed. Therefore, it comes about that when there is a sudden increase 
in the water requirements of the plant, as at the time of leafing, the absorbing 
organs are unable to supply the demand; the succulent young needles are the 
first organs of the crown to exhibit the resulting distress. It also seems apparently 
sound to assume that young trees are able the more quickly to repair the damage 
done; and under favourable weather conditions, as in the summer of 1918, to 
produce new roots in sufficient amount to provide an increased, if not fully 
sufficient, flow of water for the growing leaves and tissues of the next season. 
The older, more nearly mature, trees, and especially as is so often the case if 
handicapped by a certain amount of butt rot, are incapable of recovery, or if so, 
must recuperate more slowly. It will be necessary to follow our trees of this 
group for a few years, and incidentally in the case of recovery to note the effect 
on wood accretion. 

The cause of the disturbance to the root system remains undemonstrated. 
Drought seems the most reasonable explanation. It may be possible to test this 
theory out by a simulation of drought conditions and by a study of the course 
of these outbreaks in connection with the rainfall and temperature reports for 
affected districts. That severest blight occurs on shallow and on sandy soil 
appears significant in this connection. A more detailed account of needle blight 
will l)e prepared after the completion of the present investigation. 

The following conclusions may be tentatively offered: 

1. " Needle blight '' is at present the most serious of the needle troubles of 
our white pine. 

2. In some localities it will kill a good many trees and seriously retard the 
growch of others- — to such an extent as to be reckoned with in determining the 
time at which a stand has attained maximum productivity. 

8. It is at least a menace to young stands. 

4. Young trees recover, older trees may recover though more slowly ; a variable 
percentage of old trees die — according to observations so far, up to 5 per cent. 

5. It is now possible to distinguish between sulphur fume injury, or winter 
injury on the one hand, and needle blight on the other, 

6. The blight is not of biotic origin. 

7. The blight is not a communicable physiological disease. 

8. The blight is not contagious. 

9. The blight is related to root injury — possibly due to drought. 

« 

Survey of Diseases of Timber Trees in Ontario. 

A more extended survey was made of the diseases of the timber trees in 
Ontario, especially in the Timagami Forest Reserve. At least two new to science 
were discovered, and many not before reported for Ontario were found. Eesearches 
on some of those are now in progress. A first contribution to the list follows 
under the technical names of the causal agents. Collections were made of the 
various forms, both of the fungi and of the diseased hosts, and they have be6n 
catalogued and stored for future reference. 

In addition, valuable collections have been received from the United States 
laboratories of plant pathology, from agents of the Canadian Conservation Com- 
mission, and the Forest Products Laboratory, Montreal, including a collection of 
fungi on diseased spruce pulpwood from Thorold, Ontario, and individual con- 
tributions from various other sources. Exchanges in some cases have been effected. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 123 

Balsam (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) 

Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) Quel. Not infrequent on the roots and also found 
causing heart rot of trunk — the latter an apparently unreported occur- 
rence. 

Bjerkandera adusta (Willd.) Karst. A form common on hardwoods, but rare 
on conifers. 

Calyptospora columnaris (A. & S.) Kiihn. This needle rust is common on 
balsam, and on its alternate hosts, the blueberries (Vaccinium), in the 
Timagami Forest Eeserve, though not especially injurious. It appears 
to have been reported on balsam not more than once or twice previously 
from America. 

Coriolus hdlsameus (Pk.) Murr. Not uncommon on dead wood. For the 
first time reported as the cause of a heart-rot. 

Frost injuries. A great many small dead branches on living balsams are 
common throughout the Timagami Forest Eeserve. An examination of 
the bases of these branches discloses a wound apparently caused by the 
gnawing of some insect, at the end of the growing season. Frost pre- 
sumably completes the destruction. 

Fuscoporia marginella (Peck) Murr. Eare on fallen trunks. 

Hyphoderma. An interesting form, apparently the cause of a needle disease. 

Lophodermium nervisequum, Fries. Frequent on the living needles and some- 
times causing complete defoliation. 

Macrophoma. Common on the needles but whether or not the cause of their 
death remains undecided. 

Melampsorella elatina (A. & S.) Murr. This rust which is the cause of the 
witches' brooms on balsam is not rare. 

Phaeolus sistotremoides (A. & S.) Murr. (Polyporus Schweinitzii Fries). 
The cause of by far the worst disease of balsam and of most other conifers 
of the Timagami Forest Eeserve. Some stands are fully "^5 per cent, 
buttrotted by this fungus. 

Porodaedalm pini (Thore) Murr. (Trametes Pini Fries). A common and 
important cause of heart rot of many conifers; in Ontario it is occasion- 
ally the cause of heart rot of balsam. 

Pucciniastrum pustulatum (Pers.) Diet. Common, and found both on the 
needles of the balsam and the leaves of its alternate host, the fireweed 
( Epilobium angustif olium ) . 

SpongipelUs horealis (Fries) Pat. (Polyporus borealis Fries). Cause of a 
heart rot, apparently not frequent. 

Uredinopsis mirabilis (Peck) Magn. Common on the leaves of the balsam 
and its alternate host, the ferns (especially the beech fern, Phegopteris 
dryopteris). 

Valsa Friesii (Duby) Fckl. Apparently the cause of cankered branches. 

I 

White Spruce (Picea canadensis (Mill.) BSP.) 

Phaeolus sistotremoides (A. & S.) Murr. White spruce is fairly free from 
fungus diseases in the Timagami Forest Reserve. This and the one follow- 
ing are the two commonest causes of heart rot. 

Porodaedalea pini (Thore) Murr. 

Tyromyces guttulatus (Pk.) Murr. Infrequent on dead wood. 



124 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

Black Spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP.) 

Arceuthohium pusillum Peck. The dwarf mistletoe is not uncommon on black 

spruce throughout Ontario. In some cases entire swamps are badly 

diseased, the trees loaded with witches' brooms, due to the stimulation 

of this parasite. 
Armillaria mellea Quel. Frequent on the roots. It is also reported here 

for the first time as the cause of a heart rot. 
CoUricia tomentosa (Fr.) Murr. Occasional on roots. 
Fomes roseus (A. & S.) Cooke. Occasional on dead wood;" whether or not tlio 

cause of a heart rot remains undetermined. 
Fomes ungulatus (Schaeff.) Sacc. Very abundant on dead wood. It has 

also been found causing heart rot. 
Melampsoropsis ahietina (A. & S.) Arth. This leaf rust and the following 

one are abundant, in some cases causing considerable defoliation.' Tliey 

are reported here on both hosts, namely, black spruce, and Labrador tea 

(Ledum groenlandicum). 
Melampsoropsis cassandrae (Peck & Clint.) Arth. This rust, as in the case 

of the last, is reported here as wintering over in the alternate host. 

Found on both hosts in the Timagami Forest Eeserve, namely, black 

spruce, and cassandra (Chamaedaphne calyculata). 
Phaeolus sistotremoides (A. & S.) Murr. Common, and like the following, 

the cause of a destructive heart rot. 
Porodaedalea pini (Thore) Murr. 
Tyromyces anceps (Pk.) Murr. This fungus has been regarded as very rare 

in eastern America, but in our northern country it is found to be the 

frequent cause of decay in the fallen trunks of various conifers. 

Banksian or Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) 

Cronartium cerebrum (Pk.) Hedg. & Long. This stem rust occurs abund- 
antly and often destructively on the jack pine. It is also found abund- 
antly on the leaves of the red oak in the Timagami Forest Eeserve, on 
which, however, it causes no appreciable injury. 

Cronartium comptoniae Arth. This interesting stem rust of the jack pine 
was found on both of the alternate hosts, the sweet fern (Myrica aspleni- 
folia) and sweet Gale (Myrica Gale). It is quite certain that it will be 
found on its coniferous hosts in the Timagami Forest Eeserve, the 
locality referred to in this note. 

Cronartium pyriforme (Pk.) Hedg. & Long. Found on its alternate host, 
the bastard toad-flax (Comandra umbellata), south of Parry Sound. 
It is to be expected that this stem rust will be found on the jack pine 
in Northern Ontario. 

Lophodermium pinastri (Schw.) Chev. Frequent and causing more or less 
extensive leaf fall. 

Phaeolus sistotremoides. This together with the following are the commonest 
cause of heart rot in this pine. 

Porodaedalea pini. 

Eed Pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) 

Cronartium cerebrum (Peck) Hedg. & Long. A rare rust on red pine in the 
Timagami Forest Reserve. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 125 

Fomes roseus (A. & S.) Cooke. Fairly common on dead wood. 

Phaeolus sistotremoides. This, together with the following are the commonest 

cause of heart rot in this pine. 
Porodaedalea pini. 

Tyromyces anceps (Peck) Murr. On dead wood. 
Coleosporium solidaginis (Schw.) Thum. Abundant on asters as an alternate 

host. It is to be looked for on the needles of both the red and jack pine. 

White Pine (Pinus strobus L.) 

Cronartium ribicola Fischer. This destructive stem rust of white pine is widely 

distributed throughout southern Ontario on white pine and on various 

Ribes. It has not yet been found in Northern Ontario. 
Lophodermium pinastri (Schr.) Chev. A cause of leaf fall, but apparently 

not serious. 
Polyporus osseus Kalch. Infrequent, possibly the cause of a not hitherto 

reported heart rot. 
Phaeolus sistotremoides. Very common, doing extensive damage to mature 

or nearly mature timber. 
Porodaedalea pini. A serious heart rot, common in some localities. The 

white-spotted lumber made from diseased trunks is utilizable to a certain 

extent such as is not the case with the last. 
Tyromyces anceps (Pk.) Murr. On fallen trunks. 

White Cedar or Arbor Vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) 

Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) Quel. Apparently a common root-rot of cedars 
of all ages. Is also reported here for the first time as a cause of heart rot. 

Coriolus balsameus (Pk.) Murr. Found by Mr. A, W. McCallum for the 
first time as a probable cause of a heart rot of cedar in the Timagami 
Forest Reserve. 

Keithia thujina Durand. An extremely interesting leaf disease of cedar. 
This fungus has recently been reported as the cause of a highly destructive 
leaf blight of young western cedars on the Pacific coast. Little else 
except the original record of its occurrence in Wisconsin is known, so 
that the finding of it in the Timagami Forest Reserve is of special 
interest. 

Pestalozzia spec. The cause of a leaf disease. 

Phaeolus sistotremoides (A. & S.) Murr. Probably the cause of the com- 
monest of the heart rots of the cedar in Northern Ontario. 

Porodaedalea pini (Thore) ^lurr. Reported for. the first time as the cause 
of a heart rot in arbor vitae. 

I have the honour to be sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. J. Zavitz, 

Provincial Forester. 



126 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. J^l. 
Fuel Supply — Wood-Cutting Permits to Municipalities. 

Attention was directed in the Annual Departmental Eeport for 1918, to the 
efforts of the Department toward relieving the fuel situation in various munici- 
palities throughout the province. The Crown Timber Agents were instructed to 
select areas upon which wood was suitable chiefly for fuel purposes. They were 
instructed to co-operate in every way with the municipal authorities in locating 
such areas. 

In cases where suitable areas were found to exist, and where municipalities 
applied to cut thereon, permits were issued for the cutting of fuel free of Crown 
dues. 

Returns which have been received indicate that the following quantities of 
wood have been cut by the municipalities indicated: — 

Municipality of Port Arthur 1,879 cords. 

Town of Keewatin 326 " 

Municipality of Bucke 200 " 

Town of Kenora 1,115 " 

City of Fort William 2113/4 " 

Municipality of North Bay 781>^ " 

City of Port Arthur 2,828 " 



Total 7,3411/4 



'4 



In addition, mention might be made of the large quantities of fire-wood 
secured by operations in Algonquin Park. 

John Houser, Albert Grigg, 

Chief Clerk. Deputy Minister. 



Appendix No. Jf2. 

Honourable Gt. Howard Ferguson, 

Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, 
Toronto, Ont. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit my report of the work performed by the 
Colonization Eoads Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal 
year ending October 31st, 1919. 

This report is in tabulated form and gives the details of each work with the 
expenditure made upon it, and a summary on the final page shows the total 
amounts of the various classes of work done. ■ 

Part of the work was done by direct expenditure of the Government, to tlie 
amount of $273,744.24. The balance was expended 'by Township Municipalities 
under Colonization Road By-laws, towards which the Government made grants 
amounting to $116,877.30, making a total of $390,621.54. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 137 

A great improvement could be made iu the service by the employment of 
more technically trained men to educate and instruct the rural roadmaker, and 
to lay out and supervise his work. Many mistakes in road location and construction 
are due to lack of knowledge and errors of Judgment of the local men upon whom 
we m.ust depend to carry on road work. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the- honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLERTON, 

Superintendent of Colonization Roads. 
.Dated at Toronto, October 31st, 1919. 



128 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 







NEW ROAD 


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NAME AND LOCATION OP WORK 


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10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

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17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

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48 

49 

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North Division. 

Aberdeen, Leeburn, con. 3 

Aberdeen Additional, lot 3, con. 2 . . , 
Aberdeen, McClure & Stewart's Hill., 

Aberdeen, Miller Valley road 

Aberdeen Additional, con. 1, lot 5 .... 

Ansonia to Nesterville 

Aubrey Township roads 

Aubrey & Eaton Township roads 

Assiginack, Bidwell-Green Bay road. 

Balfour, lots 6-5, con. 5 

Balfour & Morgan, lot 2, con. 5 

Balfour Township road 

Blake & Pardee, lot 8, cons. 1-2 

Bright, con. 4 

Bright and Gladstone Twp. road 

Bright, con. 5, lot 7 

Bouchard Road in Plummer Add'l. . . 

Bridgland road 

Broder, Lambi road 

Broder, lot 8-10, con. 2 

Broder, 6 in 10, con. 4 

Broder, Kelly Lake road 

Broder, Long Lake road 

Broder, lot 6, oon. 2 

Broder, Caesar road 

Capreol, Con. 2, lots 5-8 

Capreol, Con. 4, in 5 

Capreol, 5 in 8, con. 3 

Cartier-Geneva road 

Chapleau Township road 

Claughley road 

Cobden road 

Copper Bay location 

Creighton, lots 7-8, con. 6 

Creighton and O'Donnell road 

Creighton, lot 5, con. 5 

Creighton, lots 2-3, cons. 5-6 

Cuthbertson, north from. CiP.R. . . . . . 

Cuthbertson, con. 7, road 

Day, Kirkwood road 

Day, con. 3, lot 4 

Dawson Road Township roads 

Dill, McFarlane Lake road 

Dill, Leedale road 

Dill, con. 5, lots 7-8 

Dorion Township roads 

Dowling and Fairbanks Twp. road . . , 

Dowling, lot 2, con. 2 

Dowling, Larchwood road 

Dowling, Bridge approach 



120 



200 
195 



160 
160 



35 



160 



320 
195 



320 



440 



160 
960 



80 



40 
400 



25 



40 



60 



160 



18 



gravel 



gravel 



90 
160 



40 
400 



15 



70 



160 



15 
125 



60 



370 
65 



50 



160 



160 



320 
480 



earth 



earth 



160 



40 



10 



20 



80 

1,200 

190 

640 



1,600 
20 



640 



80 



480 
80 
80 



640 



20 



1919-20 1)p:paetmext of la^tds, forests and mines. 



129 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
t919. 



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tn 

-a 

o 


.a 


03 
w 

03 








2 
3 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 




















.50 

.23 

.75 

1.75 

.50 

1.00 

1.50 

2.00 

.85 

.25 

2.00 

.25 

.75 

1.50 

1.56 

1.50 

.50 

1.41 

1.00 

.50 

.50 

2.50 

1.50 

1.00 

2.00 

3.75 

.50 

1.00 

1.50 

4.00 

3.00 

0.00 

.50 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.25 

.59 

1.38 

.53 

.81 

3.00 

.75 

.25 

.75 

3.56 

1.25 

1.00 

1.00 

.6 


$ C. 

405 04 
200 85 

299 99 
500 59 

300 00 

499 99 
344 25 
641 50 
400 00 
205 25 

500 00 
114 00 
500 00 
352 13 
450 84 
351 52 

199 99 
804 63 

200 00 
100 00 
200 50 

302 09 
150 00 
150 00 
199 87 
300 88 

251 00 
150 50 
253 30 

2, 000 00 
504 17 
359 16 
250 00 
203 50 
738 55 
104 50 
290 25 
300 00 
699 75 
349 85 
349 76 
750 00 
249 99 
150 63 
175 00 

1,500 00 
408 55 

252 00 
100 78 

303 48 


1 
















75 
240 
560 
160 


24 
22 

18 
20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


75 
125 
480 
120 


5 
5 
6 
5 


2 


r 














^ 


f. 










100 


12 


4 
















5 


r** 






1 
4 

4 


wood 
wood 
wood 


earth 


100 






R 


\ 2 


20 


wood 












''"io 

280 


6 


7 




coid'roy 


220 


85 


45 


60 


14 


gravel 
gravel 


8 


. 






9 


' 1 


16 


wood 


1 


wood 










80 
660 
320 
240 
480 
360 
460 
140 
440 
320 


12 

10 
16 
18 
18 
20 
22 
20 
24 
16 


10 


















11 








3 
9 
4 


wood 
wood 
wood 
















T* 












160 


20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


240 
80 

160 
70 

140 

130 


6 
5 

1 

5 
6 


13 












11 
















15 








4 
2 


wood 
wood 






100 
100 
160 


14 
35 
16 


16 












17 








earth 


366 


18 








3 
4 
5 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 


19 






















20 


























21 
















820 
540 
320 
720 
1,200 
160 
320 
480 
800 
960 


9 
16 
16 
16 
18 
12 
15 
12 
16 
22 








22 






















23 








2 

6 
9 


wood 
wood 
wood 
















24 
















....••. 






25 
















26 






















27 








2 


wood 
















28 






















29 








5 


wood 






80 


60 








30 












gravel 


90 


5J 


31 


1 


30 


wood 






earth 
earth 


10 
110 






32 
















gravel 


135 


5 


33 


1 


16 
16 


wood 
wood 


3 


wood 






320 
320 


15 
11 


34 


1 
















35 






















36 








8 


wood 










400 


17 








37 
















gravel 


190 


6 


38 
























39 
























gravel 


170 


5 


40 








5 

17 

2 


wood 
wood 
wood 










100 


20 


11 






















4? 




















stone 


240 


5 


13 


1 


16 
16 


wood 
wood 














44 


1 


3 
5 
5 
1 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 






240 
300 


25 
15 












15 








940 


24 


gravel 


i.ieo 


6 


46 












47 












X6i0 


25 


320 
320 


16 
12 








48 












49 








1 


iron 
















50 





























y F.M. 



130 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 





1 

1 

i 

■ 

Name and Location of Work 


NEW ROAD 






Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and SURFACED 
Shaped i 


S 


03 


tn 
o 


+3 


bo 

a 


+3 




CO 

o 

u 

bo 

e 


*3 


1 

PI 


fi1 


North Division. — Continued. 
Dryden lot 11 con 5 . . 


100 


40 


160 


12 








100 


5'> 


Dryden lot 12 con 6 








160 


'^^ 


Dryden lots 10-11 con 6 . . 
















640 


54 


Falconbridge and Garson Twp, road'. 
Fenwlck Township road 


















5t 
















44 


5fi 


Gal'braith con 2 lot 11 


















"ST 


Galbraith con 3 lot 11 
















40 


58 


Galbraith cons 2-3 


109 


40 


109 


24 








109 


5^) 


Gillies Township roads 










60 


Goldenberg road, east 
















60 


61 


Gorham Township roads 


560 
400 


40 
40 


240 


18 


gravel 


240 


6 


320 


6^ 


Gould con. 2 




6H 


Hagar, Appleby and Markstay road . . 














64 


Hagar, lots 12-13, con. 1 
















320 


65 


Hagar, 1 and 6 in 4-5 
















480 


66 


Hagar-Awrey road 


















67 


Hagar, lots 13-14, cons 1-2 
















240 


68 


Hagar, Loughrin road 
















180 


6P 


Hagar McGillis road . . ^ 


















70 


Hagar, lots 8-9, con. 5 
















160 


71 


Hagar, lots 10-11, con. 5 
















100 


79 


Hagar, lots 13-14, cons. 2-3 
















160 


73 


Hagar, lots 11-12, cons. 1-2 


320 
80 


35 
50 














74 


Hagar-Awrey road , 

Hagar, Nepowassan road 


160 


16 










75 








320 


76 


Hagar, North Finlans Corners 


















77 


Hallam, con. 1, lots 7-8 


160 


40 














78 


Hallam, con. 1, lots 4-6 














7Q 


Hallam, Mackay & Lee Valley road.. 
















20 


80 


Hallam, Lee Valley road 


300 


601 


120 


18 










81 


Hallam, con. 5 










8? 


Hallam, Birch Lake road 
















40 


83 


Hanmer, lots 7-8, con. 5 


80 
320 


25 
30 


114 


10 










84 


Hilton, Canoe Point road 










85 


Ignace Township roads 














86 


Iron Bridge and Bellingham road . . . 


















87 


Jocelyn, P. line road 


















88 


Johnson, from Rathwell's corner 

Johnson, Desibarats south road .... 


70 


45 














8Q 












100 


90 


Kirkwood, con. 3, lot 4 


















91 


Korah Township roads (hill) .-.-... 


















9?^ 


Laird-McDonald C.P.R. crossing 


















93 


Laird, sees. 20-29 


160 


40 






gravel 


100 






94 


Laird, bet. P.O. and Government road 
Laird, sees. 8-9, and 16-17 








95 


200 


30 














96 


Laird, sees. 3-10 .. 














97 


Lefroy, Main road, lot IB 


















98 


Lefroy, Hopper Main road 


















99 


Lumsden, con. 2 


80 


15 


80 


15 










100 


Lumsdeu, lot 1, oOn. 4 











1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



131 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Continued. 













CUT 
AND FILL 


OLD ROAD 




H 
Q 

W 
PU 
X 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 






Number 
Span 


1 

s 

1 


B 


1 




U2 

cS 
>> • 

o 


tn 

4 

PI 


•4-' 


o 

a 


4 


3 

1 


2 

so 

a 




« 
a 

;25 








8 
1 


wood 
wood 


















1.00 


$ c. 
259 00 

199 70 
152 62 
198 76 
449 50 

200 00 

300 00 

301 00 
1,000 00 

600 00 
2,500 00 
505 25 
155 17 
102 25 
200 50 
250 00 
102 00 
111 00 
200 00 
99.91 
150 00 
101 00 

100 00 
200 53 

90 00 
200 00 
300 00 
239 72 
300 00 
989 90 

302 25 
799 45 

150 50 
252 50 
442 74 
708 34 
250 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 

2,175 00 
200 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
275 00 
297 81 
300 00 

101 50 

151 08 


51 


2 


16 


wood 










10 

480 

80 

44 


12 
10 
16 

8 






25 


52 
















.. 1.50 
25 


53 








2 


wood 


earth 
rock 
earth 
earth 


480 

176 

500 

30 






51 


1 




cedar 




.... 


grave] 
gravel 
gravel 


59 
40 
80 


6 .50 

5 .12 

6 .31 

34 


55 








56 
















80 


20 


57 








2 

7 
3 

30 
2 
2 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
wood 


58 








earth 


78 


400 
800 


10 
12 


480 

320 

1,120 


18 
18 
24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


680 

155 

3,040 


6 2.12 

5 2.50 

6 10.25 
. . 1 . 25 


59 








60 


2 


16 


vpood 


cor'ry 


55 


61 
6? 
















160 
160 
480 
160 
320 
180 
320 
240 
160 
80 


12 
14 
15 
12 
12 
15 
16 
18 
15 
9 






.50 


63 




















50 


64 




16 


wood 


















1 50 


65 




















.50 


66 








4 
3 
5 
4 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 














1.00 


67 












150 


10 






.50 


68 
















.. 1.00 


69 




















.75 


70 




















.50 


71 








2 


wood 














.25 


72 




















. 1.00 
.75 


73 








2 

4 


wood 
wood 






80 


50 










74 












ieo 

160 

160 

90 

160 


9 
16 
24 
20 
24 






.50 


75 




















.50 


76 
























1.00 


77 




















gravel 


82 


5 .28 
.75 


78 








2 
2 
2 
3 


wood 
pipe 
wood 
wood 


earth 


800 




.... 


79 












.94 


SO 












160 


12 


640 
620 


16 

18 


gravel 
gravel 


10 
160 


6 2.00 

6 2.00 

.35 


81 












82 
















83 








1 
2 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 


















.. 1.00 


81 








cor'ry 
earth 
earth 
earth 


500 
130 
150 
150 


300 


45 






gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


600 
480 
80 
110 
200 


9 3.00 
7 2.00 
hi .25 
5 J .65 
5 .62 
.. 1.88 


85 








320 


20 


86 








87 












70 








88 
















89 
















310 




610 


20 


90 








3 


cedar 


earth 
earth 
earth 


4,100 

55 

200 






.12 


91 










.... 


8 


20 


gravel 


75 


5 .22 

.50 


9? 








1 


wood 


93 
















gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


150 
30 
110 
175 
100 


5 .47 

6 .94 

5 .34 

6 .54 
5J .31 

.25 


94 












earth 


200 






60 


18 


95 












96 




















120 


22 


97 




















98 




" 'i 






cor'ry 


440 










99 




'.'.y.'.'.'.'.' 


'.'.'. '.V.'.'.'.V. 




.... 


480 


9 







..J 1.50 


100 



132 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTBUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 



Name and Location of Work 



NEW road 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 



C3£ 





05 






« 


-<-^ 


*Ti 


■*^ 




t3 




2 






e 












tea 


S 


ja 




:g 




bi 




a 


be 






Ti 

^ 




J 



North Divisio>\ — Continued. 

Lybster Township roads 

Marks Township roads 

May, from Main road south 

May, Massey-Lee Valley, lot 7 

May, Spanish River' bridge, con. 1 . . 

May, lots 9-10, con. 1 

May, cons. 3-4, lots 9-10 

May, Massey-Birch Lake, con. 3 

McDonald, sec. 20-21 

McDonald, from sec. 16 

McDonald, sec. 1 on T. L 

McDonald, sec. 26-27 

McDonald, Saunder's Hill, sec. 16 . . . 

McKim Township road, con. 5 

McKim, iSudbury-Copper Cliff road . . 

McKinnon, con. 5, lot 9 

Mellick Township road 

Meredith, sees. 29-30 

Meredith, sec. 28-, /Sault road 

Michipicoten Township roads 

Morgan, con. 1, lots 5-6 

Morgan, lots 10-11, con. 1 

Nairn to Spanish River road 

Nipigon Township roads 

Oliver Township roads 

Patton, con. 3, to Trunk road 

Patton and Gladstone T. L. road 

Patton and, Gladstone from McLaugh- 
lins 

Pearson Township road 

Plummer, Northern road 

Plummer, con. 6, lot 12 

Plummer, from Gilroy's hill 

Plummer Additional road 

Plummer, from con. 3, lot 2 

Plummer, con. 3 

Plummer Additional, from con. 3 . - . . 

Point Aux Pins road 

Pellatt Township roads 

Rose, Maguire road 

Salter, from lot 20 

Scoble Township road, west 

■Scoble Township road, east 

Shakespeare, Centre line road 

Shedden, Spanish and Walford road. 

Shedden, south from Spanish 

Stirling Township roads 

St. Joseph, F. & G. line 

St. Joseph, B. line 

Strange Township roads 

Striker, Jensen road 



280 



320 

"so 



206 



320 



1,280 
30 



480 
'326 

no 



105 



25 



35 



ork, 



40 



40 



80 



160 
"46 



105 



18 



24 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



earth 



80 



30 



320 



40 



105 



268 
85 



160 

'ioo 



66 



10 
160 



28 



70 
160 



160 
9 



125 
25 



310 
140 



1919-20 DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



r.vs 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Continued. 









CULVERTS 


CUT 
AND FILL 


OLD ROAD 




H 
Q 

Oh 
X 




BRIDGES 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 1 SURFACED 
Shaped 






B 


ft 

CO 


1 
S 


a 


3 


3 


05 

o 

■=) 
o 


CO 

! &£ 




CO 

1 

a 




3 


CO 




03 

w 

pa 
S 


1 


r. 


plank 


10 
8 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 






120 

300 

70 


10 
24 
12 


1,560 

760 

307 

10 


18 
18 
18 
20 


gravel 
gravel 


1,600 

780 


6 5.00 
6 3.25 
.. 1.00 


4 c. 
999 45 
999 96 
252 00 
302 00 
350 00 
301 06 
404 05 

300 00 
200 00 

299 95 
399.91 
397 65 
400 00 
200 00 

1,343 20 
399 40 
590 59 

301 00 
202 25 

2, 175 00 

200 50 
175 00 
978 11 

1,001 20 

499 99 
486 16 

349 12 

451 35 
999 25 

350 00 
301 25 
248 00 

300 00 
365 75 
248 70 
345 37 

3,775 86 
1,395 36 

299 90 

300 00 
505 55 

500 00 
375 00 
199 95 
202 25 
649 70 
199 52 

201 50 
749 99 
558 15 


101 




earth 


310 


10? 








103 












gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


167 
204 
290 
160 
140 
72 
100 


51 .52 
5 .75 
5 1.00 
5 1.00 
5 .50 
5 .22 
5^ .50 
., 1.00 


104 




















105 












earth 


55 










106 








2 


wood 






160 
140 


17 
20 


107 








earth 


175 






108 








1 

1 
3 


wood 
wood 
wood 


109 






















110 








earth 


500 










111 
















gravel 


160 


5| .50 

.28 


11? 








1 


wood 


earth 


1,600 










113 












640 


20 






2.00 


114 












stone 


660 










.11 


115 








3 
3 


wood 
stone 














.64 


116 








earth 
earth 


32 

80 






45 
480 
160 

17 
240 


18 
22 
24 
12 
16 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


45 
110 
120 
284 


5 .32 
5 1.50 

5 .50 

6 7.00 
.. 1.00 


117 








118 






.... 


1 
19 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


119 


28 
1 


16 
r. 


wood 

VFOOd 


earth 
cord'y 


79 
175 


2,201 
160 


6 
40 


120 
121 










122 








4 
4 
2 


cedar 
wood 
wood 






300 
1,120 
320 
100 
160 


10 
15 
10 
14 
40 


408 


18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

gravel 
gravel 


148 
967 
320 
60 
160 

257 
720 


7 1.27 

5 5.00 

6 1.00 
5 1.50 
5 J .50 

5J 1.00 

5 6.25 

.34 


123 












124 












160 
240 
160 

70 
720 


21 
22 
20 

24 
20 


125 








earth 


100 


1?6 












1?7 

















128 








17 


wood 


earth 
earth 


20 
200 






129 












130 








2 
1 


wood 
wood 


240 


20 


100 
15 


24 
22 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


100 
108 
110 
240 
180 


5 .75 
5 .41 
5 .34 
5 .25 
5 .75 
.. 1.25 


131 












13? 
















133 












earth 


20 


2 


•• 


240 
60 


22 

18 


134 








1 


wood 


135 












400 


40 


136 
















720 

1,780 

480 


18 
15 
22 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


1,329 

1,368 

160 


6 4.75 
10 10.00 
5 1.50 
.. 1.00 


137 


2 


18 


wood 


4 


wood 


stone 


187 


480 


20 


138 
139 








4 

12 
3 
2 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 


earth 


50 






140 








800 
'40 


10 
20 


800 
160 
240 
80 
160 
106 


18 
18 
20 
18 
18 
24 


earth 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


800 

160 

80 

90 

140 

106 

90 

50 

400 

90 


6 4.00 
6 .88 

5 1.00 

6 .28 
5 .50 
5 .65 
5 .28 
5 .75 
5 2.00 
5 2.00 


141 












14? 








earth 


1,200 


143 








144 
















145 








2 
1 
2 

17 
6 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 






106 


40 


146 








earth 


170 


147 








40 
"326 


30 
25 


120 
400 
320 


30 
24 
18 


148 


1 


re 


paired 


earth 


362 


149 
150 



134 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO. 191 





Name and Location op Work 


NEW ROAD 






Cleared Graded 

and and 
Stumped Shaped 


SURFACED 


O 

O 


Si 


o 




en 
-« 
o 
u 


+3 


"3 

1 


cm 

a 




m 

-3 

hi 


1f)1 


North Division. — Continued. 
Striker, Dazzy bridge, oon. 1 ....... 


















159 


Striker, con. 2 


90 


40 


90 


18 


gravel 


90 






IFiR 


Striker, Ritchie's hill 




70 


1f>4 


Tarbutt, cons. 2-3 


100 
160 


40 
30 












110 


155 


Tarbutt, con. 5 


480 


24 


gravel 


35 


6 




15fi 


Tarbutt, Maclennan & Pt. Pinlay load. 




157 


Tarbutt, Maclennan & Pt. Finlay road 
Tarbutt & Laird T. L 
















160 


158 



















15<» 


Tarentorous, Heyden road 


290 
640 


40 
40 


290 


10 


gravel 


40 


6 




IfiO 


Thessalon, along Lake Sore 

Thompson, Draper road 




161 












7 


16? 


Van Home Township roads '. 


820 
865 


40 
36 


320 
336 


20 
20 


gravel 
gravel 


25 
11 


6 
6 


1,700 


163 
164 


Vankoughnet Township roads 

Victoria, Brown Lake to Cedar Lake 
Victoria, sees. 23-21 


""'eo 


165 


















166 


Ware Township roads, east . . .'. 

Ware Township road, west 


820 
640 


40 
40 






' 








167 


40 


16 








640 


168 


Mond and Fairbank Lake road 








320 




Total 




















12 660 




5,751 






1,616 




15, 779 

















1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



135 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Concluded. 

















OLD ROAD 




H 
Q 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


CUi 
AND FILL 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




B 

a 




is 




3 


3 


CO 

c3 
o 

3 


bfi 


1 


CO 

bo 

3 


+3 
«4-( 

-a 


'S 

s 


1 

be 

d 




n 
















160 


14 


120 


20 


gravel 


160 


5^ 


1.00 

.31 

.25 

.57 

1.50 

.75 

.59 

.50 

.91 

2.00 

.75 

4.25 

2.00 

1.00 

1.00 

3.00 

4.00 

1.00 


$. c, 

399 00 
349 44 
358 93 
304 70 
312 15 
274 55 
514 59 
299 98 
829 36 
310 49 
697 67 

1,482 90 
1,500 00 

400 62 
400 50 

1,550 00 

1,555 83 

297 58 


151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 












earth 
earth 


400 
838 
















40 
85 


24 
20 


gravel 


40 


6 
























wood 


earth 


300 


























gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


'240 
190 
147 


5 

7 


































earth 
rock 


90 
333 






77 


24 








3 


cedar 






1 


12 


cedar 
















160 








earth 
earth 
earth 


729 
862 
973 


40 
55 
40 


12 
40 
20 


55 
560 


22 
20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


150 
440 
40 
80 
200 
640 
640 


6 
6 
7 
5 
5J 
6 
7 


161 
162 
163 


1 
1 


15 
16 


wood 
wood 


7 
15 


wood 
wood 




320 
320 


18 
20 


164 
165 








2 
4 

7 


wood 
wood 
wood 












stone 
earth 


500 
75 






166 


1 


16 


wood 










167 








160 


16 


168 





























51 






409 






20, 113 


11337 


35,962 






25.772 


•• 


216.95 


78300 85 





















136 



KEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCMEDtJLE SHOTTING tHE AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION, 



PQ 

t2; 



Township 



Cleared 

AND 

Stumped 



11 



Graded 



5^ 

5; *H 



^ 



Surfaced 



is 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 



North Division. 



250 
920 



960 
690 



Alberton, By-law No. "H" 

Asstginack By-law No. 414 

Atwood By-law No. 102 

Balfour By-law No. 59 

Blezard By-law No. 105 

Blue By-law No. 43 

Billings By-law No. 247 

Burpee By-law No. 90 

Carnarvon By-law No. 323 , 

Chappie By-law No. 247 

Conmee By-law No. 40 

Dilke By-law No. 88 

Drury, Deniso'n & Graham, By-law No. 

180 

Brno By-law No. 230 

Gordon By-law No. 157 

Hilton By-law No. 399 

Rowland By-law No. 148 

Jaffray & Mellick By-law No. 99 

Jocelyn By-law No. 297 , 

Johnson By-law No. 95 

Korah By-law No. 179 

Laird By-law No. 126 ,.,,... 

Lavalle By-law No. 192 

McDonald, Meredith and Aberdeen 

Additional By-law No. 143 

Mclrvinft By-law No. 220 

Morley and Patullo By-law No. 183.. | 111 

Neebing By-law No. 377 . .' i 840 

O'Connor By-law No. 158 800 

Oliver By-law No. 183 1,440 

Paipoonge By-law No. 164 80 

Plummer Additional By-law No. 163 

Prince By-law No. 74 320 

Rayside By-law No. 216 320 

Santteld By-law No. 241 

Shuniah By-law No. 448 ! 

St. Joseph By-law No. 433 1 

Tai-entorus By-law No. 188 1 200 

Thessalon By-law No. 12 ! 

Thompson By-law No. 114 

Worthington By-law No. 91 | 260 



100 66 



290 28 



208 28 



160 14 



2,1361 

60! 

167 

365 



731 



66 



20 



Total ; 11,308 



20 



404 

28 

567 

2,240 

2,880 

242 

120 

668 

400 

725 

860 

540 

8,640 
567 

2,130 

593 

24 

5,071 



227 

4,427 

310 

420 

1,060 



653 

1,000 

1,320 

1,440 

2,060 

3,020 

450 

1,120 

12 

4,300 

210 

56 

580 

100 

320 



49,784 



28 

24 1 
24' 
16 
24 
28 
20 
18 
18| 
26 
20 
28 



gravel 
gravel 



715 
1,677 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



12 

24 gravel 
12 gravel 
22 gravel 
20 i gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



18 



20 



28 
20 
18 
18 
18 
12 
24 
18 
18 
18 
18 
33 
20 
20 
28 



100 
113 
177 
260 
2,351 
860 
193 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
earth 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



2,421 
934 
716 
381 

4,056 

395 

69 

3,370 
537 

1,602 

780 

360 

1,272 

400 

1,480 

2,240 

2,700 

871 

200 



263 
5,240 

889 
1,253 

480 
70 

210 

39,635 



1919-20 BEPARTMEXT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



137 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, UNDER MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1919. 





CUT 01 












12; 


ii 

o 






Ditched 


I Fill 


Bridges 


Culverts 


, 






a . 

•-1 CO 

a " 
< 


1^ 


Pi 




1 






46 


nlav . 


300 
120 








4 
2 
1 
8 
19 


cedar. .. 
cedar . . . 


.31 


3.25 
6.00 

.50 
9.00 
9.00 

.31 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 
9.00 
1.00 
2.00 

24.00 
8.50 

11.00 
2.50 
1.50 

21.00 
1.50 
1.00 

25.00 
2.00 
6.00 

4.00 
1.15 
5.00 
3.00 
4.12 
9.50 
9.00 

11.75 

6.50 

3.50 

.90 

27.00 
3.00 

11.00 

2.00 

.40 

1.25 


$ c. 
899 85 

1,000 00 
573 77 

1,500 00 
500 00 
625 00 
350 00 
175 00 
450 00 

4,500 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 

2,500 00 

2,919 56 
825 00 
600 00 
675 00 

1,623 02 
600 00 
300 00 

3,613 52 
400 00 

1,996 99 

600 00 

500 00 

1,991 37 

3,163 97 

1,000 00 

1,600 00 

3,064 97 

775 00 

300 00 

600 00 

200 00 

3.750 00 

1,200 00 

2,500 00 

300 00 

150 00 

575 00 


1 


40 f^lflv 








2 




Cl9,y 


50 








cedar . . . 
wood . . . 


1.50 


3 


2,880 










4 


4,320 












wood . . . 




5 


30 














1.25 


6 




earth . . . 
stone. .. 


76 
260 


IE 


18 


iwood. 


4 


rock .... 


7 








8 










7 

17 
23 

5 

9 

7 

11 


cedar. . . 




9 


160 
498 


earth . . . 
earth. .. 
earth . . . 


130 
600 
300 


4 


ie 


wood. 


cedar. .. 
wood . . . 
cedar. . . 

wood . . . 
cedar. .. 
cedar 


1.25 
3.00 
2.00 

3.00 
.75 


10 
11 










I? 
13 


1,920 








70 


earth. .. 
stone. .. 


300 
70 








14 










15 














16 


110 


earth . . . 


466 


1 

7 


16 
18 


wood, 
wood. 


8 

38 

2 


cedar 




17 


4,115 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


.50 


18 


620 


earth . . . 
rock .... 
earth . . . 
earth. .. 
earth. .. 

earth . . . 


230 

70 

2,386 

40 

50 

300 


19 


119 












20 


809 








9 


wood . . . 


1.00 


21 










22 


25 








2 


wood . . . 


2.50 


23 


272 








24 
















25 


228 


earth . . . 
earth. .. 


890 
300 


i 




7 

10 
11 
20 
15 

6 
11 

5 

5 
30 

5 
42 


metal .. 
wood . . . 
wood . . , 
wood . . . 


**2!25 
1.50 


26 


1,200 


1 14 

2 18 
1 16 


wood, 
wood, 
wood. 


27 
28 


240 






29 


1,280 


earth.. . 


200 






wood . . . 
wood . . 


.25 


30 










31 


100 


earth . . . 


^P 




"* 




wood . . . 




32 


880 








wood . . . 




33 


18 












wood . . . 




34 


720 


earth... 


100 


6 


18 


wood. 


wood . . . 




35 


37 


wood . . . 




36 


800 


earth. .. 


^44 








metal .. 




37 










38 




earth. .. 


1?5 














39 


8 








1 


cedar. . . 




40 




















21,575 




?.P57 


^ 




...... 


344 




•19.Q6 


253.13 


50,397 02 

1 



10 F.M. 



138 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF ROAD COiNSTRUCTION UNDER THE 

MINES ONT 





Name and Location of Work 


NEW ROAD 






Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


W 

3 


2; 


en 
Id 
o 
u 




to 

2 




v 
-♦J 


CO 

.a 


•in 


CO 

-§ 

bn 

a 


1 


West Divisio^r. 
Albemarle 20th sideroad 










. . 






9 


Albemarle, west road .... 














^ 


Amabel lot 20 con 4 














4 


Armour lot 24 oon 14 ..'..! 














5 


Armour, lot 5, con. 5 .". 




! 








240 


6 

7 


Baysville and Bracebridge main road 
Bethune, con 6, lot 8-15 


280 
320 


66 
20 


280 18 
160i 18 


gravel 


280 


8 


1,360 
3 


8 

9 

10 


Bethune, lots 7-10 con 8 ... 
















Brunei, Huntsville-Baysville road .... 


















Cardwell 25th sideroad 


















11 


Carling con 9, N W. road 


640 


36 














P 


Carling, 10th con. to Snug Harbour . . 














13 
14 
15 


Carling, Nobel road, lots 7-16 

Chaffey, east road to Huntsville 

Chaffey, Huntsville-Ravinscliffe 


160 
160 


25 
30 


50 
160 


16 
16 


gravel 
gravel 


50 
160 


5 
6 




Ifi 


Chapman and Lount T. L. road .... 






160 


14 


gravel 


160 


7 




17 


Chapman, Bullocks Hill road 








18 


ChapmaJn, 10th sideroad 


80 


40 


80 


18 


gravel 


80 


6 




19 


Christie Township roads 




?0 


Draper, new road from Oakley ' 














?1 


Draper-Muskoka townline ................. 
















?? 


Eastnor, 15th sideroad, cons. 1-2 
















?;\ 


Eastnor, cons. 2-3, lot 11 
















?A 


Curd and Patterson road 


















?5 


Ferguson, McKellar Village road 


















?R 


Foley, Blackstone road 


















?7 


Foley, Christie road from P.S road . . 


















?.H 


Foley, Christie road 


















?9 


Franklin, Big Peninsula road 


















80 


Franklin and iSinclair, Bobcaygeon. . 


















31 
3^ 


Freeman, Footes Bay to Mactier 

Hagerman, Nipissing-Dunchurch road 
Himsworth, N., con. 24 


160 


30 


160 


18 


earth 


160 


14 




33 


















34 
35 


Himsworth, N., 20th sideroad 

Himsworth, N., con. 22 


240 
160 


40 
20 


160 
160 


16 
20 


gravel 
gravel 


160 
160 


2 
6 




36 


Himsworth, S., 5th sideroad 




37 


Himsworth, S., con. 4, lots 8-9 1 
















38 


Humphrey, Parry Sound road 
















39 


Humphrey, il^ninsula road .1 
















40 


Lindsay, Bury road 1 
















41 


Lindsay, cons. 2-3, from' S. Bd 


















A?. 


Lount, Distress River road 


















43 


Machar, 20th sideroad ♦ 
















44 


Machar, lots 8-20, cons. 8-9 


















45 


Machar, North road to Gurd, con. 10 
Machar and Gurd, lots 25-26 


















46 


















47 


Machar and Strong, T. L 


















48 


Matchedash, Station road, con. 2 .... 


















49 


Matchedash sideroad, cons. 1-2 


















50 


McDou^all, N.W. road 


320 


40 


320 


20 























1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, EOEESTS AND MINES. 



139 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND 
ARIO, 1919. 



BRIDGES 



CULVERTS 



CUT AND FILL 



OLD ROAD 



Side 
brushed 



Graded 

and I 
Shaped 



SURFACED 















cc 




c« 






CO 












"S 


-d 




-^ 






-^ 




^ 




^ 


^ 


cS 


s 


4ii 


;-! 


•♦-1 


^ 


u 






a 




.S§ 


>H. 


ja 


^ 


J3 


ja 




ja 










-3 
o 


3 






-d 







16 



12 



112 



16 



1114 



wood 



cedar 
wood 



wood 



cedar 



concrete 

concrete 

stone 



cedar 
wood 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



stone 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



stone 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



cedar 



wood 



wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 



cedar 

iron 

cedar 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



cedar 



iron 
wood 



rock 



earth 



rock 



earth 
earth 



earth 



8,420 



100 



20 



560 
300 



60 



100 



.320 



640 
.180 



190 



80 



12 



10 



35 



30 



140 



160 

240 

1,280 



240 
350 
180 



210 

400 



160 



240 

320 

60 



15 
160 
800 
320 
320 
170 

80 
320 



160 
320 



320 

190 

240 

80 



240 
80 

240 
30 

170 

240 
20 
15 





W 




05 




p 




H 


o 
< 




1-3 


P4 




X 


S 


w 



16 



16 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
earth 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 
gravel 



125 
101 
160 
240 
1,500 



240 
95 



200 
200 



169 



240 

100 

60 

80 

85 

160 

800 

320 

320 

170 



340 



160 
320 



320 

160 

240 

80 

80 

70 

240 

80 

240 

30 

170 

240 

20 

85 



.44 
.39 
.31 
.50 
.75 

5.28 

1.00 
.75 

2.50 
.50 

2.00 
.50 
.50 
.75 

1.25 
.50 
.50 
.25 
.75 

1.25 
.25 
.25 
.31 
.50 

2.25 

1.00 

1.00 
.53 
.25 

1.25 
.50 
.50 

1.00 
.75 
.50 

1.00 
.59 
.75 
.25 
.25 
.21 
.75 
.25 
.75 
.09 
.53 
.75 
.06 
.31 

1.00 



$100 
150 
250 
300 
300 
12656 
300 
319 
400 
250 
302 
257 
299 
403 
400 
249 
200 
300 
350 
200 
300 
100 
150 
251 
980 
280 
301 
299 
275 
300 
314 
299 
400. 
300 
400 
300 
300 
358 
252 
150 
100 
301 
200 
301 
197 
300 
301 
156 
200 
313 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



140 



BEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARI 



Name and Location of Work 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



NEW ROAD 

Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 



-<-= 




+3 




-§ 


*a 


<u 


o 


a> 






0) 


V 


;-i 






^ 






























jn 






^ 




jq 


is 


43 


i^ 


-** 


5 = 








<u 


b* 




:3 


a 


^ 


•*3 


c 


-o 1 


^ 


^ 


^. 


;^ 


^ 



West Divisiox.— Con^inwed. 

51 McKenzie, lot 35, con. 1 , 

52 McMurrich and Ryerson road 

53 McMurrich, Beggsboro Creek road • 

54 McLean, Lake Shore road 

55 Medonte, lot 11, con. 11 

56 Medonte, lot 20, con. 12 

57 Medonte, lot 21, con. 12 

58 Medonte, con. 1, lot 55 

59 Medonte, slderoad 10-11, con. 12 . . , 

60 Medora, Ferndale road 

61 Medora, Peninsula road 

62 Medora and Wood, Long Point road 

63 Mills, con. 12, lot 11 

64 Mills, lots 22-28, con. 8 

65 Mills, 30th sideroad 

66 Monteith, Axe Lake road 

67 Morrison Township roads 

68 Muskoka, Musquosh road 

69 Nipissing, 5th sideroad 

70 Nipissing, cons. 10-14 

71 Nipissing and Rosseau road 

72 North Orillia sideroad 15-16 

73 North Orillia, Boyd road 

74 Oakley, Mud Lake road 

75 Orillia, Muskoka road 

76 Orillia, Rama road 

77 Oro, lots 21-22, con. 11 

78 Patterson, North side Restoule L. . . . 

79 Patterson, West bd. lot 24 

80 Pringle and Gurd, T.L 

81 Pringle and Mills, 5th sideroad 

82 Ridout, Baysville road 

83 Ryde Township roads 

84 Ryde Township road, con. 10 

85 Ryerson, lots, 1-10, coii. 12 

86 South Orillia road, cons. 1-2 

87 Spence, Sudgen road 

88 i Stephenson, Utterson road 

89 St. Edmunds, Bury road 

90 iStisted, sideroad 15-16 

91 Strong, con. 13, lot 14 

92 Strong, 10th sideroad, con. 7 

93 Strong, cons. 13-14 

94 Sunnidale Township roads 

95 Tay, lot 8, con. 4 

96 Tay, Victoria Harbour road 

97 Tay, Port Severn road 

98 Tay, con. 4 to C.P.R 



(no rep 



120 



780 



.rt) 



35 



40 
106 



160 
80 



40 



Total 



320 



18 



160 



gravel 
gravel 



160 
120 



14 



gravel 160 



330 40 

80 30 



3,930 



160 



2,716 



16 



1650 



1,611 



1919-2(> DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



141 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
0, 1919. 









CULVERTS 


CUT 
AND FILL 


OLD ROAD 




H 

Q 

PL, 

X 




BRIDGES 


Side- 
Brushec 


Graded 

and SURFACED 
Shaped 






s 
a; 






s 




3 


CO 


CO 




CO 

o «J 

^ ^ 1 


1 « 

:- - o 

M if W 
O '3, ^^ 

^ ^ s 










5 


cedar 










2401 
6401 


2 gravel 
6 gravel 


2401 
640 


2 .75 

8 2.00 
.00 


$ c. 
300 00 
305 75 
300 00 
205 20 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
250 00 
400 00 
500 00 
450 00 
286 38 
200 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
503 33 
513 75 
305 78 

199 00 
300 00 
175 00 

200 00 
280 00 
250 00 
207 60 
250 75 

299 43 

300 71 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
300 00 
198 00 
399 92 
355 26 
250 00 
399 28 
300 00 
256 50 
303 00 
500 00 
420 00 
203 40 
500 60 
200 00 


51 
















5^ 












stone 


234 






53 
















3201 

1401 

401 

44 2 


8 gravel 
8 gravel 
8 


100 
45 


5 1.50 

7 .44 
.12 

8 .14 
.12 

7 .52 

7 1.75 
5 2.00 

.00 
.50 
.38 

8 .50 

2 2.00 
5 1.50 

5 4.00 
. 2.50 
8 1.00 

6 .50 

6 .59 
.18 

5 1.50 

7 .41 
7 .16 
7 1.38 
7 .47 
5 .50 
5 .75 

.50 
5 1.50 

3 2.00 

2 2.00 

3 1.00 
1 .26 
3 .75 
5 4.50 
J .41 
3 .50 

1.03 

.50 

.00 

i 3.00 

.02 

1 .16 

J 2.00 

i .31 


54 




















55 












earth 


400 






56 
















gravel 


44 


57 




















58 








1 

4 


iron 
wood 












. gravel 


90 
240 
200 


59 












300 
600 


50 
50 


2401 
2001 


8 gravel 
8 gravel 


60 












61 
















6? 


























63 








2 
2 

4 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 
















61 
















1601 
80 

480 2 
1,2001 


2 gravel 
8 gravel 
gravel 
8 gravel 


160 
801 
200 
400 


65 










640 


20 


66 












67 




















68 






cedar 


1 
5 
2 
2 


cedar 

cedar 

cedar 

tile 










69 












3201 
1601 


6 gravel 
6 gravel 
. , gravel 
4 


320 
160 
190 


70 
















71 
















7? 












60 
200 


30 
50 


60 2 
1601 


73 

















8 gravel 
. gravel 
. stone 
2 gravel 
4 gravel 
6 gravel 
6 gravel 


100 
130 
56 
70 
150 
160 
240 


74 
















75 






















76 




















440 2 
1501 
1601 
240 1 


77 








2 

6 

7 

1 


cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 










78 
















79 
















80 




16 


cedar 








81 








200 

10 

100 

160 


40 

40 
16 


3201 
2501 
6001 
3201 
72 2 
2401 
1,200 2 


3 gravel 
i gravel 
8 gravel 
5 gravel 
gravel 

4 gravel 
gravel 
. gravel 

5 gravel 


200 . 
250 . 
4001 
320 ( 
84 ' 
240 ( 
1,200 ( 
130 ' 
160 J 


8? 








2 
3 
6 


wood 
stone 
cedar 


stone 


5 


83 








84 












85 








earth 


160 


86 
















87 








6 
2 


iiron 
wood 






1,000 


50 


88 








stone 


40 


89 








160 


30 


1601 


90 








3 
2 


cedar 
cedar 






91 






















q-> 








earth 


225 












93 








1 
1 


iron 
concrete 






960 2 


4 gravel 


659 { 


94 








clay 
stone 
stone 


710 

90 

330 




95 














, gravel 
. gravel 
) gravel 


45 ' 
230 ' 
100 ! 


96 








4 


stone 








97 














100 2 
17,916 . 


98 




— 


















q 




192 






11,654 


4,940 




16,273 . 


87.65 


40,745 06 























142 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION, 



Township 



Cleared 


AND 


STUMPED 


tn 






-^j 














a 


,C3 


cm 









GRADED 



SURFACED 






CO 






'T3 


■*=> 




o 


















rd 


j=i 


i) 


M 








T3 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 



West Divisiorr, 

Albemarle By-law No. 574 , 

Amabel By-law No. 218 , 

Chapman By-law 5 

Draper By-law No. 378 

Eastnor By-law No. 34 , 

Hlmsworth South By-law No. 58B 

Joly By-law No. 169 , 

Keppel By-law No. 12 , 

Lindsay By-law No. 285 

Macaulay By-law No. 60 

Machar By-law 552 , 

Matchedash By-law No. 197 , 

Medonte By-law No. 564 

Medora and Wood By-law No. 322 , 

Monck By-law No. 460 , 

Muskoka By-law No. 289 

Oro By-law No. 449 

Orillia By-law No. 968 , 

Perry, By-law No. 144 , 

Sarawak By-law No. 7 

St. Edmunds By-law No. 232 

Stisted By-law No. 238 

Strong By-law No. 403 . 

Tay By-law No. 676 

Tiny By-law No. 593 , 

Vespra By-law No. 619 

Watt By-law No. 520 

Tiny By-law No. 565, 1918 



Total 



60 



1,380 



10 
640 



480 

215 

50 



8,322 

200 
1,020 
330 
100 
220 



50 
300 



220 

30 

640 



9,267 



25 



50 



696 

250 

1.848 

5,210 

40 

160 

115 

575 

675 

2,200 

202 



1,405 
1,900 
4,811 
3,787 
45 
360 



505 
170 

1,240 

80 

777 

875 

120 

1,395 
930 

30,371 



gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 



1 , 243 
437 

1,570 
620 

1,143 
160 
115 
854 
901 
990 
278 
390 
490 
900 

1,285 

1,347 
165 
765 
229 
793 
305 
340 
203 
885 
530 
750 
415 
395 

18,498! 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



143 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, UNDER MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1919. 



DITCHED 


CUT OR 


FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


w 
o 
< 

s 

p 
< 

O 



S 

Q 
*^ 


Q 



^ Ed 
^ 





Length, rods 


s 


03 

si 

H 
If 


<v 
-a 

B 


i 

en 




V4 
a; 
-a 

s 


1 


03 




rock 
earth 


20 
270 








6 


wood 




5.50 

2.50 

9,00 

21.00 

4.00 

.55 

,40 

8.00 

3.50 

8.00 

1.00 

1.25 

5.00 

18.00 

29.00 

14.00 

.75 

2.50 

.75 

2.50 

1.50 

4.00 

.75 

4.00 

3.00 

3.00 

6.00 

4.00 


$ c. 
750 00 
500 00 

1,000 00 
496 89 
700 00 
100 00 
100 00 

1,000 00 
900 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
800 00 
700 00 

1,520 16 

1,000 00 
525 00 

1,000 00 
150.00 
797 13 
300 00 
300 00 
199 47 

1,000 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 


1 










2 




3 
2 


12 
18 


wood 
wood 


12 
37 


wood 
wood 




3 


30 
200 


earth 
earth 


160 
200 


4 
5 


50 














6 














I 

8 

2 

13 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 




7 


i 










8 




rock 
earth 


16 
30 








9 










10 




1 


12 


wood 


11 








4 


wood 


.17 


12 




earth 


. 660 


1 
1 


18 
16 


cem'nt 
wood 


13 




13 
28 
30 


wood 
wood 
wood 


"i!oo 


14 




rock 


60 


15 




42 


16 


wood 


16 




earth 


1,015 


17 










2 
4 
2 


concrete 
wood 
wood 


18 


215 


rock 


15 








19 










20 


■ 








21 


j . ! 








6 
1 
4 
5 
1 


wood 
metal 
metal 
metal 
wood 


".'75 


22 




1 








23 




stone 
earth 
earth 
earth 


360 
100 
430 
600 


1 


30 


cedar 


24 


20 


25 










26 










27 


125 








1 


metal 




28 
















640 


1 


3,936 


13 






180 




1.92 


163.45 


16,938.65 













144 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 



Name and Location of Work 



NEW ROAD 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





c« 






to 




+3 


^3 


-*a 




"^ 


-(J 






a 






m 


a 




0) 






0) 














,a 


^ 


^" 


c3 


4:: 


jd 




ao 


-*J 


<» 


at 




TS 

^ 








a 


T3 



East Division. 

1 Addington road, Kaladar-Denbigh . . . 

2 Admaston, Shamrock & Mt. St. Patrick 

3 Admaston, Briscoe road 

4 Admaston, Douglas-Mt. St. Patrick.. 

5 Admaston, Admaston-'Station road . . . 

6 Admaston, Shamrock-Dacre road 

Admaston^ Douglas road 

Admaston! lots 1-12, con. 2-12 

9 Alice and Eraser, con. A, lots 15-16 . . 

10 Alice and Eraser, B. line, lot 30 

11 Alice and Eraser, con. 8, lot 14 

12 Alice and Eraser, con. 12, lot 31 .... 

13 Alice and Eraser, con. 12, lot 23 .... 

14 Alice and Eraser, T.L., lot 1 

15 Alice and Eraser, Egativille road . . . 

16 Airy Township roads 

17 Anstruther Township road 

18 Asphodel and Dummer road 

19 Badgerow, con. 1, lots 8-9 

20 Badgerow and Hugel, con. 3 

21 Bagot and Blythfield, lot 30, con. 8 . . 

22 Bagot and Blythfield, T. L. road 

28 Bagot and Blythfield, Ashdad Station 

24 Bagot and Blythfield, con. 9 

25 Bagot and Blythfield, lot 25, con. 9.. 

26 Bagot and Blythfield, Eraser road . . 

27 Bagot and Blythfield, Becker road .. 

28 Bagot and Blythfield, lots 10-23 

29 Bangor, Wicklow and MoClure Tp. rds. 
80 Barrie & Kennebec Tp. road 

31 Barrie, Harlowe-Addington road .... 

32 Beckwith, Scott's cor. road 

33 Beckwith, Fourth line road 

34 Beckwith, Eleventh line road 

35 Belmont Tp. Factory road 

36 Bexley Tp., Cameron road 

37 Bexley, Victoria road 

38 Bonfield Township roads 

39 Boulter Township roads 

40: Bromley, Black Bay road 

41 Bromley, Proving line, con. 9 

42 Bromley, Douglas, 8th line 

43 Bromley, Douglas-Caldwell road 

44 Bromley and Wes'tmeath T. L 

4fiBrunell and Lyndock, con. 16 

it Brunell and Lyndock, Malone Svvamp. 



260 40 



Brunell and Lyndock, Whalen's Swamp 
Brunell and Lyndock, lot 33, con. 4.. 
Brunei and Lyndock, Malley Church. . 
Brunei and Lyndock, lots 33-35 .'. 



85 
480 



260 



18 



85 
210 



320 



stone 



65 



gravel 
gravel 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



145 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Continued. 









CULVERTS 






OLD ROAD 




s 

X 




BRIDGES 


(CUT 
AND FILL 


Side 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




►Si » 


3 


^2; 


3 




to 
u 

o 


CO 

2 

SJ3 
PI 




CO 

be 

!=l 

a; 


as 




xn 

2 

ao 


+3 


03 

S 








21 


wood 


earth 


3,500 


340 


10 


48016 
120 30 
160 30 

80 24 
12024 

80 24 


gravel ! 

gravel ! 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel f 

gravel 

gravel ; 

gravel i 

gravel 

gravel i 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

earth 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


1,500 
120 
160 


i 
8 

10 
10 


6.00 
.38 
.50 
.25 
.38 
.25 
.25 
.50 
.25 
.38 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.12 
.38 

3.00 
.42 
.24 
.50 

3.00 
.12 
.12 
.^0 
.50 
.38 
.25 
.25 

2.00 

2.25 
.75 
.50 
.38 
.38 
.25 
.22 
.65 
.25 

5.25 

1.50 
.50 
.25 
.12 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.12 
,50 
.25 
.50 
.75 


$ c. 

7,078 30 

200 00 

200 00 

108 00 

150 00 
207 28 
152 00 
349 50 
112.00 

151 00 
150 00 
150 00 
104 00 

104 00 
252 50 

1,018 00 
200 00 

100 00 
300 00 
565 35 

50 00 

50 00 

200 00 

101 63 
100 50 

105 50 
100 62 
900 00 

1,007 15 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
203 80 
200 62 
100 00 
515 35 
100 00 

1,656 57 
464 75 
150 00 

203 75 
75 00 

223 48 
303 00 

204 55 
103 50 
150 00 
100 00 
250 50 
200 00 


1 








9 





























2 


tile 










8010 
12010 

80:10 

80' 6 


\ 
















c 




















p. 




















7 




















160 


40 


160 

80 

120 


10 
10 

in 


V 








1 


cedar 



























i20 


30 


in 


















80 24 

80 24 

4024 

40 30 

120124 

77516 

10018 


8012 


11 


















80 

40 

40 

120 


lol 

r 

6 
in 


n 


















IP 


















11 


















1 ^1 








16 


wood 










310' 6 

132 5 

42 5 

80 6 

200 8 

40 10 

4010 

16010 

160 6 

1201 6 

80'l0 

8010 

64010 

240 6 

I35I 8 


\(\ 
















n 


















35 


20 


1V 


? 


14 


wood 












i<i 








earth 


250 


400 




120 20 

40 25 

4024 

160 24 

16018 

120i24 

8024 

80 24 

640 24 

56014 

150 14 

27114 

12074 

120 30 

8024 

i. 


'>r 


?, 


12 


wood 






•>i 




1 


cedar 










•>•) 
















oq 


















01 


















•>'i 


















•>fi 










I 








'>^ 








6 
4 


cedar 
cedar 










00 


1 


14 


cedar 


earth 


300 


80 


20 


2£ 








5 


Wood stone 


55 


20 


10 


190 

120 

120 

80 

75 

167 

52 

650 


6 

10 

10 

10 

5 

5 

5 

5 


?l 








T" 








! 








V5 








1 




. 




'}\ 








1 








•?f 








8 


wood 






40 


55 


18 

60 

1,125 


30 
18 
16 


Tf 




















10 
5 


wood 
wood 


stone 


223 






•>< 












"}( 
















« 




gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
loam 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gra-vel 


160 

80 

40 

160 

160 

160 

40 

160 

80 

160 

240 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


i< 




















80 

40 

160 

160 

160 


24 
24 
24 
24 
24 


11 




















t' 








































4i 

1 f{ 




















if 




















il 












• 








160 

80 

160 

240 


24 
24 
24 
24 


i' 








2 


cedar 










1< 
















A( 












1 








5( 



146 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 



NAME AND LOCATION OF WORK 



NEW ROAD 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





tn 






CO 




t3 


-1-3 




t3 


s 


o 






o 


^ 


}-i 


•i^ 


,_, 


>-l 


, 


.xi 


, 


ce 


^ 


A 


■*^ 


-a 


^ 






ao 


>j 


0) 


&£ 




3 




1 





East Division. — Continued. 

51 Brunell and Lyndock, Roche road . . 

52 Brougham, Bruce Hill and Dacre road 

53 Brougham, Lanes Corner to Church. 

54 Brougham, Kennelly Mountain road. 

55 Brougham, Dacre & Mt. St. Patrick.. 

56 Burleigh road 

, 57 Calabogie and Ashdad road 

58 Calvin Township roads 

59 Cameron Township roads 

60 Carden Township roads 

61 Carlow, Ryan road 

62 Carlow, Douglas road 

63 Cavendish, White Lake road! 

64 Cavendish, cons. 1-6 

65 Chandos Township, Post road 

66 Chandos, Tanner road 

67 Chandos, .Scott road 

68 Chandos, Couch road 

69 Chandos, Wellington road 

70 Chisholm Township roads 

71 Clarendon and Plevna road 

72 Clarendon. Clarendon and Plevna roac 

73 Clarendon, Mountain road 

74 Clarendon, Plevna and Lavant road . . 

75 Dalton, Monck road 

76 Dalton Township roads 

77 Darling, con. 8, lot 15 

78 Darling, con. 1, lots 16-17 

79 Denbigh and Renfrew Boundary road 

80 Denbigh, Rose Hill and Vennacher road 

81 Douro Township road 

82 Dummer, Factory road 

83 Dummer, Church line road 

84 Dummer, Stoney Lake road 

85 Dungannon Township roads 

86 Dysart, Haliburton-Eagle Lake road. 

87 Elziver Township roads 

88 Ennismore, Pigeon Creek road 

89 Ennismore, Gannons Narrows road.. 

90 Faraday, Township roads 

91 Faraday and Herschel Twp. roads , . 

92 Ferris Township roads 

93 Field and Bastedo, Field road 

94 Galway, Bobcaygeon road 

95 Feronia and Widdifield road 

96 Glamorgan, Monck road 

97 Glamorgan, Kinmount Sta., Minden rd 

98 Grattan, Caldwell Station road 

99 Grattan, Fourth Chute road 

100 [Grattan, MoGrath road 



280 



675 



40 



40 



t8. 



120 



360 
120 



240 



1 75 



16 



gravel 



16 



66 



40 



40 



120 



120 



170 
'240 



24 



gravel 



30 



30 



gravel 120 



16 



gravel 



earth 



20 



20 
240 



950 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



147 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Continued. 







j 










OLD ROAD 


< 

l-H 


OS 

. & 

Eh 

S 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


CUT 
AND FILL 


Side 
Brushed 


G raded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




i 


1 

CO 


1 
a 


1 

a 


3 
S 


3 


o 


CO 


+3 

-a 


CO 

I 




3 


CO 

o 

3 


>3 


PQ 
























gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


120 

80 

120 

80 

80 

180 

80 

925 

240 

368 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
5 


.41 

.25 

.50 

.50 

.25 

.56 

.25 

3.00 

1.85 

3.00 

.50 

.25 

.31 

.32 

.35 

.31 

.10 

.15 

.13 

5.00 

4.00 

2.00 

4.00 

.50 

2.00 

7.00 

.25 

.38 

4.50 

.25 

.94 

.15 

.21 

1.59 

1.00 

2.12 

.50 

.26 

.35 

2.00 

1.00 

9.00 

.38 

.66 

.75 

2.00 

.66 

.25 

.25 

1.00 


$ c. 
133 00 
154 00 
152 50 

101 50 
100 00 
699 07 
107 70 

1,183 35 
602 50 
601 54 
217 25 
100 50 
100 00 
100 00 
149 50 
100 55 
147 00 
99 89 
100 00 
1,500 00 
1,500 00 
401 80 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
400 00 
300 75 
200 00 

199 80 
103 89 

200 50 

100 00 
99 95 

777 00 
811 07 
686 69 
208 80 

102 00 
200 00 
707 39 
303 50 

1,411 75 
650 00 
502 55 
279 99 
312 00 
414 12 

101 00 
200 00 
203 75 


51 




















24 

120 

40 

80 


16 
24 
24 
24 


5^ 




















53 




















54 




















55 








2 


cedar 










56 
















80 
525 
320 
822 
160 

80 
100 
105 


24 
16 
16 
16 
14 
16 
16 
16 


57 








6 
5 
3 


wood 
wood 
tile 










58 
















59 












90 
40 


8 
20 


60 












61 
















gravel 


80 


7 


f\?. 




















63 


























64 




















gravel 


118 


5 


65 








1 


wood 










. 100 


16 


66 












108 


16 


stone 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


34 

50 

45 

380 

980 

208 

40 


6 
16 
5 
6 
6 
8 
6 


67 








3 


stone 






34 

45 
230 
370 

63 
100 

97 

640 

2,390 

80 


16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
40 
16 
16 
18 
24 


68 
















69 


1 




wood 


17 
6 


wood 
wood 










70 




stone 


1,180 


108 


16 


71 








79 












stone 
earth 


60 
360 






7^ 
















74 
















gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


81 

279 

80 


5 
6 
6 


75 
















45 


10 


76 








2 


cedar 






77 
















78 




















960 
40 

120 
50 
70 


18 
14 
18 
20 
18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 


160 
55 

300 
40 
70 

191 

120 


5 
7 
5 
5 
5 
5 
7 


79 




















80 




















81 




, 

















S** 





















• 8T 
















150 
160 


10 
20 


84 








3 


tile 






280 


16 


85 












86 




















160 

85 

80 

580 

320 

1,480 


16 
20 
22 
16 
14 
1^ 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


ieo 

85 

62 

420 

160 

i440 


7 
5 
5 

7 
7 
7 


87 




















88 





















89 




1 • • 




4 

2 

26 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 










90 













160 


20 


91 












92 








earth 


400 






93 
















150 


18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


65 


5 


94 




















95 
















30 
85 


10 
18 


165 

80 
80 


16 
18 
24 


150 

105 

80 

80 

320 


6 
8 

10 
10 
10 


96 








5 


wood 


stone 


220 


97 








98 




! 
















99 




!.. 




. . • 












320 


24 


100 



148 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 



Name and Location of work 







NEW ROAD 








Cleared 


Graded 






and 


and 


SURFACED 


H 


Stumped 


Shaped 




P 


OJ 




w 






CO 






t3 


-(J 


ti 


+3 




'« 


+3 


'tS 


o 


01 


o 






o 


<1> 


o 


^ 




t-l 




























43 

-*3 


^ 


4a 


43 




j3 


.a 


5 




ni 
^ 




t3 


4J 






3 



East Divisiox. — Continued. 

01 Grattan, O'Brien road 

02 Grattan, Opeongo line road 

03 Grattan, Gorman road 

04 Grattan, Dacre and Caldwell road . . 

05 Griffith and Matawatchan Tp. roads. 

06 Griffith and Dacre Township roads . . 

07 Hagerty, Richards and Burns roads. . 

08 Harvey Township roads 

09 Head, Clara and Maria Twp. roads . . 

10 Herschel, Mud Creek bridge, fill . . . . 

11 j Hinchinbrooke Township roads 

12 Horton Township roads 

13 Howe Island Ferry road 

14 Hungerford Township roads 

15 Huntingdon Township roads 

16 Kennebec Tp., Arden and Horseshoe. 

17 Laxton, Digby and Longford roads . . 

18 Limerick Township roads 

19 Loughboro, Eel Lake road 

20^ Lutterworth Township roads 

21 Lyell Township roads 

22 Madawaska and Hastings Twp. roads 

23 Madoc Township roads 

24 Mattawan Township roads 

25 Mayo Township roads 

26 McNabb Township roads 

27 Methune Township roads 

28 Miller, Aibinger and Miller road .... 

29 Minden and Dorset Township roads.. 
30 1 Monmouth Township roads 

31 Monteagle and Herschel Twp. roads.. 

32 Noelville-St. Charles roads 

33i North Algona Township roads 

34 North Crosby Township roads 

35! Olden Township roads 

36: Oso, Crow Lake road 

37 Oso, Armstrong road 

38 Oso and Bedford road 

39 Pakenham Township roads 



80 



400 



40 



40 



280 



840 



Palmerston Township roads 
Papineau Township roads . . 
Pembroke Township roads 
Pettawawa Township roads 

Phelps Township road 

Radcliffe Township roads . . 
Raglan Township roads .... 
Rama Township roads .... 

Ramsay, 7th line road 

Ratter, lot 2, con. 2 

Ratter, Hagar-St. Charles . . 



280 



305 



300 



640 



40 



160 



24 



16 



40 



30 



40 



40 



15 



40 



280 



225 



80 



370 



600 



gravel 



40 



10; 



16 



16 



18 



18 



20 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 



60 



42 



245! 



9 10 



10 



310 



178 



160 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



149 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Conchided, 



BRIDGES 



u 




<u 




rO 




B 


S 


s 


Q, 


>5 


O! 



CULVERTS 



OLD ROAD 



CUT 
AND FILL 



Side- 
Brushed 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 








!» 






M 


■♦J 


-t3 


■*^ 




-tS 


9J 


o 


1> 




o 


4) 


t-i 


<u 




^ 


MH 




«M 


.S 




•> 


Xi 


>. 


Jd 


JH 


*3 


J3 


*- 


-tj 


-t-* 


&c 


■t^ 


0) 


M 







•^ 
^ 


-(J 


(3 



• 


» 




ff! 




P 




H 


|2] 








P^ 


E^ 


)J 


CU 




X 


g 


W 



93 1 wood 



cedar 
cedar 
wood 
tile 
wood 



tile 



earth 
earth 



gtone 



stone 
cedar 
tile 
wood 
wood 
wood 
iron 
wood 
cedar 



cedar 



16 wood ' 25 wood 



15 wood 



16 wood 



10 1 wood 
3! cedar 
21 wood 



tile 
tile 



5i cedar 
14! wood 



2| tile 

14 wood 

7 cedar 

6 cedar 



earth 



850 
110 



157 



45 



stone 



cord'y 



100 



110 



earth i 40 
stone 20 



earth 



stone 



81 



177 



stone j 165 

earth 30 

stone I 485 

earth 30 



earth 



earth 



, ..I iron 
13' wood 



250 



80 24 

120 24 

120 24 

80 24 

340 24 

720 24 

1,640124 

6018 

50116 

16 22 



340 
160 



8 16 



507 



2,995 

395 

80 

2,080 



30 



400 



earth 600 i 
rock-c 527! , 



16 



10016 
8014 



20 



426 
160 
147 

97 
180 
470 

40 
350 
200 
440 
134 

40 

3,429 

640 

564 

80 

80 
199 
320 
320 



280 
162 
1,720 
640 
440 



920 
400 
275 
160 



TS??f-« 




gravel 


80 


gravel 


120 


gravel 


120 


gravel 


80 


gravel 


540 


gravel 


720 


gravel 


2,160 


gravel 


222 


gravel 


20 


gravel 


*'"i33 


gravel 


160 


gravel 


20 


gravel 


200 


gravel 


80 


gravel 


175 


gravel 


243 


gravel 


320 


gravel 


129 


gravel 


142 


gravel 


20 


gravel 


40 


gravel 


140 


gravel 


220 


gravel 


440 


gravel 


280 


gravel 


190 


gravel 


2,100 


gravel 


1.100 


gravel 


360 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



200 
161 
410 
310 



280 
355 
280 
640 
440 



900 
400 
275 



16010 



.25 

.38 

.38 

.25 

1.50 

2.25 

7.12 

.69 

2.50 

10.00 

1.41 

.50 

.06 

1.00 

.25 

.50 

6.25 

1.00 

.50 

2.50 

1.50 

1.50 

.12 

1.75 

1.00 

1.50 

.89 

.50 

14.00 

3.75 

2.25 

6.00 

.62 

.75 

2.25 

1.00 

.13 

.26 

.88 

2.50 

6.00 

2.00 

1.75 

.88 

2.50 

2.00 

2.75 

.50 

.02 

3.001 



101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 



$ c. 
99 00 

150 00 

156 25 

231 00 

942 00 

714 75 
1,201 68 

420 75 108 

402 50 109 
;,445 44110 

698 30 111 

200 00 112 

400 00,113 
384 44114 
100 50 115 

201 11 116 
601 42117 

200 97 118 

201 15 119 
316 701120 
527 50 121 
520 00 122 
200 75 123 
607 00J124 

632 14125 
,208 00126 

302 00 127 
200 001128 

,733 97 129 
700 00130 
913 64 131 

,493 631132 
378 75|133 
457 651134 

401 75 135 

299 56 136 
200 50 137 

300 00 138 
700 90139 

,180 70140 
.524 75141 
881 00142 
599 50 143 
511 65144 
,007 50145 

633 49 146 
.204 02147 
299 00,148 
450 00149 
500 OOilSO 



150 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 





Name and Location of work 


NEW ROAD 


S 




Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


03 
5?; 


cm 




CO 

1 


1 


<x> 


CO 

2. 

a 


+3 


CO 
'^ 
o 

u 

a 


151 


East Division. — Continued. 
Rear of Yonge Township roads 


. 
















1Fi'> 


Rolph^ Buchanan & Wylie Twp. roads 
Ross Township roads 


















1F»!^ 


















151 


Sabine Township roads 


320 
40 


40 
50 


320 


18 










155 


iSebastopol Township roads 


gravel 


40 


10 


160 


156 


Sheffield Township roads 








157 


Sherwood & Jones Township roads . . 


















15S 


Smith Township, Buckhorn road .... 


















15Q 


Somerville, Bobcaygeon road 


















160 


South Crosby Township roads 


















161 


South Aligona Township roads 


















16** 


South Algona (Dunnigan) 










no work 


done 






16S 


'Stafford Township roads 














164 


Storrington Township roads 
















200 


165 


Tudor and Cashel Township roads. . 
















166 


Wollaston Township roads 














1 


167 


Westmeath Township roads 














'.'.'.'.\.. '..'.. 


16S 


Widdifield Township roads 


60 


40 


60 


IS 






1 


16^) 


Wilberforce Township roads 










170 


Yonge Escott road ... 




















Total 




















6.974 


.... 


4,069 






1021 


.... 


2,311 













1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



Jul 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
1919.— Concluded. 

















OLD ROAD 


- 


w 
o 
< 


H 
Q 

X 




BRIDGES 


CULVE?>,TS 


CUi 
AND FILL 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




u 

s 





••■a 

eg 


a 






o 

3 
o 


to 

be 
a 

3 




to 

d 

:5 






to 
o 

P 




05 












rock 


677 






45 
200 
560 
397 
440 
223 
760 
169 
165 


18 
24 
24 
16 
24 
14 
20 
18 
18 






.13 
1.10 
1.75 
2.50 
2.00 
1.75 
3.00 

.53 
1.00 
1.12 
2.00 


j 

$ c. 
907 87 151 








3 


cedar 






gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


360i 7 

580 6 

50 6 

480 10 


500 00 152 
















837 00 153 








7 
3 
4 
6 


wood 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 










531 74 154 
















657 75 155 








rock 


473 


20 


10 


410 
820 
112 
190 
301 
422 


6 
6 
5 
6 

I 


901 22156 








1,203 55157 
















301 10158 








3 


tile 


stone 


110 


170 
95 


32 
18 


375 00 159 








397 98 160 








1 


cedar 






600 


24 


854 75 161 
















500 00 162 




















240 
267 
800 
80 
480 
535 
1,280 


24 
16 
14 
16 
30 
16 
24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


240 
479 


10 
10 


.75 
1.75 
2.50 

.25 
1.75 
7.00 
4.00 

.50 

245.81 


325 00 163 








4 
9 
1 


wood 
cedar 
tile 










700 60 164 












210|20 


808 86165 












80 

480 

1,502 


7 
5 

7 


200 00 166 
















726 531167 


?, 


18 


wood 


13 
2 


wood 
wood 










1,374 95168 












1,280! 6 
107 i 8 


1,659 47 
100 00 

88,101 03 


169 
















170 
































75 




380 






11,615 


8.827 


•• 


51,665 






39,182 

















152 



1?EP0RT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OP ROAD CONSTRUCTION, CO 





TOWNSHIP 


Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


i GRADED 


SURFACED 






-(J 


1 

43 

a 


-(J 


3 


CO 

1 

a 

a 




1 


East Division. 
Admaston By-law No 231 






1,120 
520 
112 
120 
960 

2,265 


24 
80 
16 
18 
80 
20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


1,280 
520 
305 
802 
960 
740 

1,628 

75 

240 

58 


10 


. 2 


Bagot and Blythfield By-law No 325 .... 






10 


3 


Bedford By-law No. 37 B . 






7 


4 


Belmont By-law No. 606 






5 


5 


Bromley By-law No. 281 




.... 


10 


6 


Caldwell By-law No. 271 




5 


7 


Camden By-law No 485 






6 


g 


Cardiff By-law No. 538 


508 
140 


10 
20 


3,813 

400 

990 

40 

1,400 
325 
820 
360 

7,310 

294 

14 

265 

1,400 

862 

.180 

30 

400 

320 

60 

480 

720 

960 

280 

560 

1,787 

1,028 
774 


18 
16 
20 
18 
20 
18 
16 
16 
16 
18 
14 
18 
30 
16 
14 
16 
16 
14 
18 
14 
16 
20 
16 
14 
12 
16 
18 


g 


g 


Carlow By-law No. 112 


7 


10 


Casimer etc , By-law No. 84 


7 


11 


Chisholm By-law No. 94 








12 


Cosby and Mason By-law No. 41 






gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


110 

185 

229 

50 

1.787 

586 

600 

1,756 

1,400 

1.713 

240 

80 

480 

480 

860 

500 

880 

820 

160 


g 


13 


Douro By-law No. 869 






5 


14 


Dummer By-law No. 864 






6 


15 


Dungannon By-law No 89 


12Q 
3,610 


20 
12 


7 


Ifi 


Dysart By-law No 603 


17 


Eldon By-law No 486 


5 


IS 


Elzevir Bv-law No. 38 A 






7 


19 


Front of Leeds By-law No. 739 

Grattan By-law No. 271 







6 
10 


^1 


Hinchinbrooke By-law No. 4 






g 


99 


Hungerford By-law No. 224 






7 


?8 


Hungerford By-law No. 228 






5 


94 


Huntingdon By-law No. 406 


" 




7 


25 


Limerick By-law No. 4 


80 


20 


7 


^6 


Loughboro By-law No. Ill A 


g 


97 


Madoc By-law No. 44 






7 


?8 


Marmora and Lake By-law No. 538 






7 


9q 


Martland By-law No. 133 






6 


SO 


Mayo By-law No. 334 


40 


20 


7 


81 


Monteagle and Herschel By-law No. 483. 
Minden By-law No. 318 




32 


1,580 


8 


gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

stone 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 


668 

1,115 

1,177 

585 

160 

814 

1.040 

400 

405 

1,680 

265 

940 

788 

528 

668 

760 

225 

565 

1,200 

640 

1,860 

400 


j; 


33 


Olden By-law No. 50 B 


g 


31 


Oso By-law No, 154 


15 


40 


7 
8 


35 


Pittsburg By-law No. 4 


36 


Portland By-law No. 612 










g 


37 


Rama By-law No. 362 










6 


38 
39 


Ratter and Dunnett By-law No. 22 

Rawdon By-law No. 403 


'920 


12 


2,640 
320 


18 
14 


6 

7 


40 


Richmond By-law No. 657 






s 


41 


Ross By-law No. 363 






1,680 

64 

940 

2,605 
286 
750 
680 

2,202 


30 
16 
24 
16 
16 
20 
30 
16 


10 


A?. 


Sheffield By-law No. 634 






g 


43 


Sherwood and Jones By-law No. 20 






10 


44 


Snowden By-law No. 198 


1,150 
114 


10 
15 


6 


45 


Somerville By-law No. 710 


g 


46 


Springer By-law No. 305 


g 


47 


Stafford By-law No. 691 






10 


48 


Stanhope By-law No. 348 


50 


10 


7 


49 


Storrington By-law No. 477 , 


g 


50 


Tudor and Cashel By-law No. 12 






1,280 
400 

1,360 
160 


14 
16 
24 
14 


7 


51 


Tyendinaga By-law No. 681 






7 


5? 


Westmeath By-law No. 220 






10 


53 


W'ollaston By-law No. 1 






7 


54 


Wollaston By-law No, 7 










(Purchase of stone crusher) 

Total 








. . . . 






• • • • 




8,272 




46,281 


. . . . 




84,892 


. . .. 



1919-20 ])EPA1?TMENT OF LAKDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



I5;j 



LONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, UNDER 


MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1919. 




. DITCHED 


CUT 
OR FILL 


1 

BRIDGES 

1 


CULVERTS 


< 

< 





1-3 

Q 
-< 




2; Q 

> Cu 

w 




to 

1 

tn 
a 

1-3 


2 

M 


.S'g 

is 

§.2 


1^ 

B 


-(J 


.1 

u 

-2 


a 
























4.00 
1.63 
1.75 
1.25 
3.00 

15.00 
5.10 

22.00 
1.25 
5.00 
1.00 
8.00 
1.10 
3.00 
1.12 

57.00 
2.00 
2.00 
6.00 
4.50 

11.00 
.75 
.25 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
3.00 
6.00 
1.00 
2.00 
8.00 
4.00 
4.00 
1.80 
3.32 
2.75 

10.00 
1.25 
1 51 


$ c. 

l-,050 00 

1,000 67 

450 00 

600 00 

1,225 00 

1,271 01 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

450. 00 

550 00 

524 82 

349 09 
150 00 
300 00 
300 00 

2,986 87 

799 60 
400 00 

1,427 32 
1,009 80 
950 00 
200 00 
50 00 
299 98 
400 00 

350 00 
400 00 
500 00 

674 42 
350 00 
400 00 
700 00 
750 00 

1,200 00 
450 00 
500 00 

800 00 

675 00 
400 00 
'n(\(\ on 


1 




















2 














2 
1 


metal 
metal 




3 














4 




- 










5 




i-otk 


230 








2 


metal 




6 










7 


123 












35 
6 


wood 
cedar 




8 














9 


375 












10 





















11 


! 










22 


wood 




12 














13 




















14 














10 

35 

2 


cedar 
w6od 
metal 




15 


400 


earth 


"206* 








16 


20 


1 


35 


cem't 


17 








18 














6 


metal 




19 














20 


. 1,000 


stone 


200 








16 


metal 




21 










22 




















23 














1 
3 


cedar 
cedar 




24 




. 










25 


120 












26 














3 


metal 




27 




■ 










28 










3 


wood 


5 
9 
8 

11 
11 
19 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
metal 
stone 




29 










30 










10 
20 


cedar 
wood 


31 








1 


32 








33 




earth 


420 








34 










35 




















36 




earth 


150 














37 


300 








10 
3 


wood 
cedar 




38 














39 














40 




















5.25 1.500 00 
1.50 298 25 
3.00 1.200 00 
10.00! 699 97 
3.00 500 00 
3 00 ^Qfi ">"> 


41 


60 












4 


metal 




42 




cemen t 


225 








43 




2 


16 


wood 


14 
2 
3 


wood 
metal 
wood 




44 


16 


stone 


125 


45 










46 














2.50 
8.00 
2.00 
4.00 
2.25 
4.25 
1.25 


596 58 
350 00 
450 00 
750 00 
500 00 
1.000 00 
350 00 
500 00 


47 


150 


rock 


40 








15 

1 
3 


wood 

tile 

cedar 




48 










49 














50 






k 








51 




















52 




















53 




















54 
























2,566 




1.590 


7 






262 ' 




262.83' 37,084 60I 





154 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OP ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARI 





NAME AND LOCATION OF WORK 

• 


NEW ROAD 






Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


fi3 
o 


OS 

w 

03 
S 


CO 

1 




m 

4 
i 

1-^ 




3 


Cfi 

o 


i 


CO 

1 

"S 

a 


1 


TiMISKAMING. 

Armstrong from the T.N 0. west .... 


















•> 


Armstrong cons 3-4 to Earlton .... 


















S 


Armstrong con 1 lots 2-3 


160 


40 


300 


24 








160 


4 


Armstrong cons 2-3 lots lO'-ll 










5 


Armstrong con 6 lots 2-3 


240 


30 


240 


30 










6 


Armstrong between lots 4-5 . 






.... 




7 


Barber, between lots 2-3, Leeville . . . . 
Barber and Cane townline 


262 


24 


107 


16 








234 


8 










q 


Barber and Tudhope lots 1-2 


















in 


Brethour, cons 4-5, lots 1-6 


160 
240 


30 
30 






gravel 


12 


5 


320 


11 


Brethour, cons. 5-6, lots 4, 5, 6 

Brethour cons 5-6 lots 6-7 


240 


94 


480 


1? 










655 


13 


Brethour, T.L., lots, 2, 3, 4 
















60 


14 


Brethour and Casey T L lot 4 


















If) 


Bucke, High Falls west, con 4 


















Ifi 


Bucke, Wabl River road 
















6 


17 


Bucke, Mill Creek road 


















18 


Bucke Lakeview to McDonalds 


















n 


Bucke, Main road south 
















50 


?n 


Cane, lots 1-2, cons 5-6 
















70 


?i 


Cane, lots 4, 5, con. 5 
















160 


?? 


Cane lots 8-9, cons. 5-6 


320 


35 


20 


30 








25 


?3 


Cane, lots 6-7, from Oso 










?A 


Cane, cons. 5-6 ,lots 11-12 


320 
160 


24 
30 












200 


?,h 


Cane, lots, 10-11, con 4 . . ... 












3« 


?fi 


Cane, lots 4-5, cons. 3-4 














?7 


Cane, between lots 4-5, con. 2 

Casey, cons. 3-4, lots 1-2 


91 


30 


91 


22 








190 


?8 








320 


J?9 


Casey, Cobalt road 


















30 


Casey, Mine road . 






118 
160 


24 
16 








500 


31 


Casey, con. 6, lots 9-10 












160 


3? 


Casey, T.L. north between lots 4-5 .. . 
Casey, lots 6-7, cons. 3^4 


240 


30 


80 5>fi 








160 


33 












180 


34 


Casey T.L., con 3 
















640 


35 


Dymond, lots 6-7, con 6 
















240 


36 


Dymond, Ndrth road, cons. 5-6 
















37 


Dymond, North road, con. 6 



















38 


Dymond, west road 
















210 


39 


Firstbrook, Main road, lots 1-4 
















340 


40 


Firstbrook, Drapo road, con. 2 

Firstbrook, cons. 2-3 


324 


40 


320 


20 










41 










42 


Henwood, lots 2-3, con. 4 
















160 


43 


Henwood, lots 2-3, con. 6 


260 


40 


200 


24 








160 


44 


Henwood, cons. 2-3, lots 5-6 . . » 








460 


45 


Henwood, lots 11-12, con. 3 


















46 


Henwood, lots 8-9, con. 6 


100 


33 


100 


24 








200 


47 


Henwood, cons. 4-5, lots 7-12 










48 


Henwood, cons. 5-6, lot 9 


160 


30 


100 


22 










49 


Henwood, between lots 6-7, cons. 3-4. 










50 


Henwood, cons. 3-4, lots 6, 7, 8 


'.WW'X.'.'.. 














400 



L919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



155 



)NIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
), 1919. 

















OLD ROAD 


o 
[J 


a 
X 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


ClJi 
AND FILL 


o;j„ Graded 
Side- „„ 1 


SURFACED 




h 

s 
5 


Is 

c 1 


a 


3 3 


CO 

u 

>» 

o 


m CO 
T3 -<-» "^ 
O 0) o 

^ ^ '^ 

5 ^- 5 
as ♦f M 

^ ^ ^ 




1 


CO 

1 


-4 


05 
S 






1 


i 

1 wnnH 












gravel 


80 


8 


.25 
1.00 
1.00 

.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 

.70 
2.00 

2.00 

.75 

.25 
2.00 

.50 

.50 
1.00 

.25 
1.00 
1.00 
1.25 

.50 
1.25 

.50 
1.50 

.50 

.75 
1.00 
1.00 
2.50 
3.00 

.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 

.75 
1.00 

.50 
3.00 

.50 
2.00 
1.25 


$ c. 
817 07 
402 05 

500 00 
296 70 
508 00 
408 75 
705 47 

396 14 
300 50 

501 25 
500 00 
699 00 
801 05 
493 07 
500 00 

500 00 

302 93 
199 67 

502 12 
362 85 

397 75 
499 87 
199 00 
602 60 
394 00 
201 07 
300 62 
613 58 
236 00 
602 12 
499 18 
701 81 
900 00 
400 00 
798 75 
998 05 
747 12 

2,000 00 
1 007 40 


1 












200 2 


320 


?? 




2 




j 


1 wood 
3, wood 














3 


1r 


. . wood 
64 wood 


earth 
earth 


1,015 
533 














4 


? 














5 








300 


24 


gravel 


194 


7 


n 


1 


16 wood 1 wood 

16 wood 1 i wnnd 


earth 


55 






7 


1 




640 


24 






8 


8 






1 wood 
1 wood 
1; wood 
1 wood 


earth 


287 






earth 


40 


q 












10 






















n 












640 


24 








v> 








1| wood 










gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


272 
213 
116 


8 
7 

7 


13 


















14 








4 AvnnH 


earth 
earth 
stone 


118 
493 
342 


i ' 

1 


400 
30 


24 
24 


1^ 








1 


wood 


16 








stone 
gravel 

stone 
gravel 


186 

75 

213 

107 


7 
8 

7 
7 


17 






















18 












stone 


20 




30 


24 


19 












20 






















^1 




























92 


















80 


24 


gravel 


35 


7 


23 


















^'1 








2 
1 
1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


















'^5 




_ 










380 


24 


gravel 


82 


7 


26 














97 














• 


•• 


earth 
stone 
stone 


265 

100 

20 


7 
6 


^8 


















'^9 








7 


wood 








387 


24 


SO 














31 




























32 




.. 




1 


wood 








120 
.... 


24 


gravel 
earth 
earth 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


160 
140 
58 
139 
100 
600 
173 


7 
6 
7 
7 
7 
8 
7 


33 












3201 


84 


1 


33 


wood 


2 


wood 


earth 
earth 
stone 


1,058 
40 
55 


320 
240 
160 
560 
480 


22 

24 
30 
24 
24 


35 
36 












37 








4 
9 

1 
2 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
metal 


38 














^Q 


2 


36 
75 


wood 
wood 


earth 
stone 


55 
55 




500 00 40 


1 


1601 


5 160 
320 


24 
24 


gravel 


30 


7 


500 00 41 
500 36 42 




















301 40 

399 61 
300 00 
200 35 
519 50 
299 14 

400 00 
399 62 


43 


i 


is 


wood 


2 
1 
1 
5 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 








240 
. 320 


22 
22 








44 




earth 


177 











i'y 


1 










'■ 


46 














800 


24 


gravel 


14 


7 


47 


. ^ 












48 




i 




earth 


fiO ' 1 


360 
370 


24 
24 






•• 


49 
50 


.. 


.. 










::::::i: 



156 



EEPORT OP THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE COL 

ONTARIO, 191 





Name and Location of Work 




NEW ROAD 


Q 

w 

! ^ 

3 




Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


05 


o 

a* 

2 




CO 

1 


• 1—1 


S 
1 


03 

1 

at 






f11 


TiMiSKAMiNG. — Continued. 
Henwood, lots 10-11, cons. 5-6 


\ 








:- 




5^ 


Harris, lots 4-5, con. 6 


! 








.... 1 ... . 


340 


53 


Harris, T.L., lots 2^Z, north 


^ 1 . 














54 


Harris, lots 2-3, con. 6 














110 


55 


Harris, cons. 5-6, lots 1-4 
















56 


Harris, Lake Shore road 










1 


76 


57 


Harris, cons. 2-3, lot 1 


L. . 








1 




58 


Hudson, lots 2-3, cons. 2-3 












58 


5q 


Hudson, lots 6-7, con. 5 












440 


60 


Hudson, cons. 3-4, lots 1-7 














61 


Hudson, T.L., lot 6 . . - 


1 








t 




6? 


Hudson, lots 3-4 


I 












68 


Hudson, T L., Kerns lots 2 3 4 ... 














64 


Hudson, T.L., Kerns, lots 9-10 


i""" 


200 


24 


gravel 


iisi 7 


350 


65 


Harley, cons. 5-6, lots 10-12 




400 


66 


Harley, cons. 4-5, lots 11-12 














67 


Harley, lots 819, con. 5 










: 




68 


Ha,rley, lots 4-5, con. 4 










" 


....L... 




69 


Harley, between lots 2-3, con. 4 ..... 

Harley, cons. 5-6, lots 4, 5, 6 

Harley, T.L., Casey, con. 6 


240 
160 


10 
30 






1 


204 


70 
71 


160 


30 


gravel 


80 


7 


420 


72 


Harley-Dymond, North road, west . . . 


















73 


Harley-Hilliard, T.L., lots 9-11 


















74 


Hilliard, lots 3, 4, 5, con 4 


















75 


Hilliard lots 8-9 cons 1-2 


















76 


Hilliard, lots 6-7, cons 5-6 
















130 


77 


Hilliard, lots 4-5, con. 3 


100 


10 


180 


24 








75 


78 


Hilliard, lots 6-7, con 5-6 


■ 




665 


79 


Hilliard lots 2-3, con. 6 
















225 


80 


Hililard, Gravel Pit road 


258 


25 














81 


Hilliard, Armstrong T.L., cons 1-4 . . 














82 


Hilliard, Harley, T.L., lot 2-8 
















15 


83 


Ingram T.L., lots 3-4 


60 


38 


820 


24 








640 


84 


Kerns, cons. 3-4, lots 1, 2, 3 










85 


Kerns, lots 6-7, con. 6 


30 


80 












280 


86 


Kerns^Armstrong T.L., east 














87 


Kerns-Armstrong T.L., T.N.O 


















88 


Kerns-Harley, T.L., lots 4, 5, 6 

Kerns-Henwood T.L., cons. 3-6 


















89 


















90 


Tudhope, lots 4-5, con. 2 


160 


40 


260 
370 


20 
15 








70 
370 


91 


Tudhope, lots 2-3, con. 1 










Total 














4,045 




3,566 






207 


.... 


11,644 













1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, EOEESTS AND MINES. 



157 



ONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES, 
9. — Continued. 

















OLD ROAD 








BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Cbx 
AND PILL 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




OS 

EH 
X 




1 


OD 


** 


i! 1 


3 
1 ■ 


CO 

o 

o 


05 
In 




ac 

5 


ID 
-a 


s 


CO 

2 

a 

au 




03 




















160 


24 


gravel 


160 


7 


1 

.50 500 00 
1.00 535 02 

.75 700 00 
2.00 834 ^0 


'^l 








2 


wood 


rock 


10 






^'> 












' 




gravel 

gravel 
gravel 


240 

6 

172 


'e 


^? 








2 


wood 


earth 
stone 


800 
221 






370 


22 


"SI 








.50 

2.00 

.50 


301 54 
352 00 
Rr,o on 


^^ 








4 


wood 






660 


16 


^f\ 








earth 


693 






57 
58 
















320 
80 


24 

24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


100 
80 
357 
240 
160 
310 


6 

8 
7 
7 
7 
6 


2.00 499 70 












gravel 


120 






1.50 

1.50 

.75 

2.0G 

1.00 

.75 

1.00 

1.25 

.50 

.25 

.75 

.50 

1.00 

.75 

.75 

.50 

1.50 

1.50 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

2.00 

2.00 

1.00 

1.25 

.75 

2.00 

.50 

1.00 

3,00 

.85 

1.25 


500 00 
1,000 52 
404 97 
600 00 
806 30 
300 62 
302 50 
275 00 

399 18 
200 00 
300 00 
202 53 

400 07 
800 00 
500 95 

401 76 
600 00 
200 00 
298 50 
300 00 
235 32 
298 75 
699 41 
399 36 
462 57 
















60 
























61 














i 




640 
320 


24 
24 




















fi^ 




















64 




















160 
380 


24 
24 
































R6 












earth 
earth 


743 






gravel 


30 


7 


fi7 












1,031 










6S 






• 






















69 






























70 




















320 


26 








71 




















gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


240 
208 
110 
340 
35 


7 

7 
8 
7 

7 


79 






















73 








1 


wood 










60 


24 


71 
















75 












gravel 


148 






70 


24 


76 








1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 






77 












160 


24 


earth 
earth 


igo 

60 


8 
8 


78 












60 


8 


70 
















SO 




















gravel 
gravel 


309 
65 


7 
7 


81 








earth 


222 






240 


24 


82 




12 


WOO d 






^•■f 


















earth 


400 


7 


800 00 »i 
























401 32 
810 85 
599 80 
715 08 
999 00 

699 56 

700 00 


85 












gravel 


80 










gravel 
gravel 


210 
160 


8 
8 


86 




















87 


1 


16 


wood 






earth 


711 










88 












400 


24 


gravel 


303 


7 


89 








1 
1 


wood 
wood 










90 


1 


15 


wood 




















91 
























13 ..: 81 






9,142 


740 


•• 


4,760 






7,897 




104.05 


46,802 70 



























158 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION, 



Township 



CLEARED 


AND 


STUMPED j 

1 


o 


4) 


xi 


.. 


-*-3 


JS 


Cm 




a 


t3 


^ 


^ 



GRADED 



SURFACED 



+3 




<u 




V 










a 


ja 


•,-1 




OJ 


'n 








'^ 


s 



Temiskaming. 

Brethour By-law No. 12 

Bucke By-law No. 223 , 

Casey By-law No. 55 ...... 

Chamberlain By-law No. 60 

Dymond By-law No. 185 

Harris By-law No. 63 

Hilliard By-law No. 108 

Hudson By-law No. 76 . 

Kerns By-law No. 166 ..... 



960 
320 
310 
400 



44 
145 



260 



Total ........... .^... ..| 2,439 



10 



2,500 
2,540 

660 
3,226 
9,180 

925 
3.780 

770 
7,900 

31,481 



24 1 gravel 
24 i stone 
24 \ stone 
24 gravel 
20 gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



1,236 
540 
231 
305 
402 
207 
506 
30 
853 

4,310 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



159 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, UNDER MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1919 



DITCHED 


CUT* OR FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


» 

S 

Q 
< 



s 

< 


(=1 



SO 





tn 
-73 
o 
t-l 

M 
U 

a 




CO 

at 

i| 
l<5 






'5 

1 


B 




03 
m 


706 


earth 
earth 
earth 

clay, 
earth 

rock 
earth 
earth 
earth 


1,355 

106 

20 

100 

1,404 
456 
911 
888 
515 








9 

3 

6 

19 

14 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 


1.50 

1.00 
.50 

.15 

.50 


17.00 
8.50 
7.00 

13.00 

32.00 
3.00 

12.50 
3.50 

28.00 


$ c. 
2,715 00 

1.275 00 

1,039 00 

799 97 
2,018 63 

623 96 
1,701 20 

600 00 
1,684 27 


1 


1,410 

855 

31 


1 

2 


22 
16 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 


2 
3 

4 


1,260 
241 


5 
8 
3 


24 
16 
20 


5 
6 


1,858 


5 
3 

17 


wood 
wood 
wood 


7 

8 


328 


1 


24 


wood 


9 


6,689 




5,755 




20 






76 




3.65 


124.50 


12,457 03 













IGO 



REPORT OF THE 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



North Division. 



No. 3 



$50 00 


91 


08 


36 


00 


29 


40 


' 29 


70 


20 


62 


2,271 


80 



Item. Expenditure. 

1. Van Home Township, balance 22 00 

2. Ware Township, balance 101 00 

3. Phillips & Benner, survey , 205 97 

4. Jas. Eraser, culverts 29 50 

5. Storage of tools , 75 OO 

6. Luke Waker, compensation for injuries, Dryden road 150 50 

7. Inspection, 1919 5,204 57 



West Division. 

8. Juddliaven road, balance, 1918 

9. Carling Township roads, balance, 1918 

10. C. H. Meader, survey and location expenses, Bracebridge- 

Baysville and Chisholm Township road 

11. Bury road, balance, 1918 

12. Lawrence Masters, compensation for injuries, Bethune 

Township road 

13. Juo. W. Sanders, Compensation for injuries on the Brace 

bridge-Baysville road 

14. Inspection, 1919 



East Division. 

15. W. W. Pringle, Addingtop road, balance, 1918 

16. August Blenkie, Addington and Palmer Rapids road, 

ibalance, 1918 . . . . , 

17. J. Beatty, Kaladar and Tweed, balance, 1918 

18. Wm. Hughes, storage of tools, Addingtoii road, balance, 1918 

19. Grant to Storrington Township, 1918 

20. L'Amable Station road, gravel 

21. Long Lake Cemetery hill, cedar 

22. Jas. Douglas, compensation for injuries, Carlow road 

23. P. Rochefort, railway fares, balance, 1918 

24. H. N. Moss, board account 

25. A. J. Southern, inspection 

26. P. Rochefort, Chisholm road inspection 

27. One McLaughlin motor car 

28. Feronia road, balance 

29. Charleston Lake road, R. E. Cornell 

30. Inspection, 1919 



Temiskaming. 

31. Harley road, ibalance, Allan Ludlow 

32. W. E. Kerr, storage of tools 

33. E. Frisby, Diamond Township, balance, 1917 . 

84. Frank Leslie, balance, Temiskaming road 

35. Inspection, 1919 



$50 10 



5,788 54 



$2,528 60 



25 65 




21 50 




I 11 85 




300 00 




100 00 




294 00 




42 96 




53 80 




14 00 




114 30 




26 00 




1,414 85 




33 00 




25 00 




7,498 15 






$10,025 16 




50 00 




72 00 




274 62 




15 63 




1,040 05 






$1,452 30 






$19,794 60 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



161 



I 






M 



« 



51 

o 



02 



to 


;>i 


OS 


^ 


-a 


a 


»-l 


3 


M 


C 




CO 


-ta-TS— < 


tS 


c3§« 


>. 




S 




o 



-O T3 




1^1 


to 


t "i-d 


u 


O w 




-« "H 




2-^1 


to 

1 


|ii 


o 1^ 





1—1 o 
CO as 



CO SM ^ CTl 



1— I ro CM 



CO iO ;D ;D 

w cvT »-i CO 



C! 



I 



o re 



o 



to o 
^ o « p- 



o o S S fl fl 
•" •«! 2 2 o o c a 

rft to •'^ "^ .is .=^ .2 .2 



Q 



.2i .a 2 
Q 



« Q Q --^ •■=; 



& 


to 


rt 


t- 






>. 


Q 


m 


•^ 


hn 


to 


a 


3 






J 


1 



.22 .22 13 

a a ■ 






»H SM «5 ^ 



11 F.IVT. 



162 



REPORT O^.THE 



.: No. -3 




steel bridge at Kapuskasing; erected 1919. 




Building a home in the North. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



163 



Appendix No. JfS. 
The Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, Ontario. 

SiK, — I have the honour to submit to you the report of the work of the 
Northern Development Branch, done under my supervision during the season 
ending October 31st, 1919, in Temiskaming District and that part of Algoma 
District in 'the vicinity of the Town of Hearst, being otherwise described as : ( 1 ) 
the area tributary to the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Eailway and its 
branches from Latchford to its Northern terminus at Cochrane, a distance of 
almost one hundred and sixty miles, and (2) the area tributary to the Canadian 
National Railways from the Quebec boundary westward, for a distance of about 
two hundred miles. 

On account of the scattered settlements in Northern Ontario, the problem 
of providing good roads for all is very difficult and costly, particularly so when 




iScene at Swastika, Ont. 

wages are high and labor is scarce. In many cases it is a question of having a 
bad road or of having no road at all, so that we have, in order to serve the different 
isolated settlements, many miles of road varying in quality from very good to 
very bad, much of it often impassable at certain seasons of the year. With more 
compact settlements the same expenditure would have constructed better and more 
satisfactory roads on account of less mileage required. 

No new roads were cut out in advance of settk^nent during the past season. 
This class of work was only done in order to let settlers out and give their children 
access to school. The principal work done was towards the completing of roads 
that had been commenced, and the repairing and improving of existing roads. 
Considerable gravelling was done during the winter in the neighborhood of 
Matheson, Monteith and Cochrane. It was found to be more cheaply done in 
winter and provided work for settlers during a slack time. 

The details of most of the work done are shown in the accompanying schedule 
in tabulated form. In addition to what is shown on this schedule, a steel bridge 
12 F.M. 



164 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Avas erected over the Kapuskasing Eiver in O'Brien Township, and the sub-structure 
for another over the Mattagami Eiver, near Timmins, has been ahnost completed. 
Erection of the steel will probably be completed during the month of January. 

Besides constructing roads and bridges for settlers, considerable attention was 
paid to the wants of the mining population. A railroad from Swastika to Kirkland 
Lake Mining Camp had been projected, but on the representation of the people 
interested and to avoid the heavy expenditure entailed, it was decided to undertake 
the construction of a water bound macadam road. 




Road in Temiskaming. 



The construction of a similar road from Elk Lake to Gowganda was under- 
taken in lieu of the railroad that had been urgently requested. It was estimated 
that it would cost three-fourths less to construct, and that it would answer all 
requirements. 

Considerable progress was made on both of these roads under most trying 
• labor and weather conditions. Several months' work, with more favorable condi- 
tions, will probably see the completion of the former road, but it will require 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 165 

several seasons to complete the road to Gowganda without considerable expenditure 
upon additional plant and equipment. 

In conclusion, I have to say that all our road work could be carried on more 
efficiently if our organization included more technically trained and experienced 
road makers. Modern road building is an occupation by itself and too much 
responsibility should not be allowed to rest on the shoulders of the local handy 
man who has not had the training and experience necessary to do the best work. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLERTON. 

Director, Northern Development Branch, 



Toronto, October 31st, A.D. 1919. 



TemisJcaming District. 



TJie Uonourcible the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines, Ontario. 

Sir, — Under the provisions of the Act of 1912, and subsequent amendments, 
for the development of Northern and North-Western Ontario, I recommend for 
the construction, maintenance and repairs of roads and bridges the following 
expenditures, for the season ending October 31st, 1930. 

(A) In the territory served by the Temiskaming and Northern 
Railway from Latchford to Cochrane. 

(1) From Latchford to Swastika, including the Elk Lake and 
Charlton branches of the railway and mining camps of Boston Creek, 
Kirkland Lake and Larder Lake $1 00,000 

(2) From Swastika to Monteith 75,000 

(3) From Monteith to Cochrane, including the Iroquois Falls 
Branch and Porcupine branch of the Railway as far as Porcupine River. 75,000 

(4) The Porcupine Mining District, including Mountjoy Township 50,000 

(B) In the territory served by the Canadian National Railways, 
from the Quebec boundary to Grant, and southerly along the Algoma 
Central Railway to Oba. 

(1) From the Quebec boundary, west to Fauquier, including roads 

for Soldiers' and Sailors' Colony in Shackleton Township 75,000 

(2) From Fauquier to Grant, including roads for Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Settlement in O'Brien and Owens Townships 75,000 

Unforeseen expenditures 50,000 

All of which is respectfully submitted. $525,000 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLERTON, 

Director, Northern Development Branch, 
Toronto. October 31st, 1910. Temiskaming District. 



16G 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— NORTHERN DEVELOP 

COCHRANE 





Township 


Location 

(On line between 

from to ) 


Cutting 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Burning 
L.& W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Stumping 
L.&.W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grubbing 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grading 
L&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


1 


Brower 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Calder 


Bet. HI & IV across 1 & 2. 

Bet. 2 «& 3 across II to VI, 
inclusive 


14x10 
80x66 

120x66 

40x66 
5x66 


14x10 


14x10 


14x10 


'80x24 


2 








114x24 


3 


Bet. IV &J^ across 1, 2 & 3. 
Bet. II & III " 1, 2 & 3 
Bet. Ill & IV " 11&12.. 








60x24 


4 




5x24 


5x24 


33x24 


5 






6 


Bet. 10& 11 " V & VI .. 










4x30 


7 


Bet.VIII&IX" 19to28in- 
inclusive 






101x30 

87ix30 
50^x30 
25Jx24 
25|x30 
25|x24 
505x24 


101x30 

87?x30 
50Jx30 
25Jx24 
251x30 
254x24 
50ix24 






do 

do 

do 

do 

Calvert 




8 


Bet. X & XI across 13 to 16 
inclusive 








q 


Bet. Vni & IX across 1, 2&3 
Bet.VIII&IX " 4&5. 
















10 










Bet. Il&m " 1,2&3 

Trunk road Porquis Jet. to 

Iroquois Falls 








11 








P 


80x20 
51x16 








, do ........ 

do 

do 

do 

Clergue 




13 


Trunk road Porquis Jet. to 
Nellie Lake 










14 


Bet. IV andV across 1,2 & 3 
Bet. I & 11 across 9 










58x30 


15 






40x33 


40x33 
10x30 




16 


Bet. IV and V across 1 & 2 
(part) , 






5x30 


17 


Trunk road Porquis Jet. to 
Monteith 












do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

4o 

Cl'ute 


330x24 


18 


Bet. 6 & 7 across II to V in- 
clusive 


80x66 






80x24 


100x24 


19 


Bet. III&IVacross5, 6&7 

Bet. II & III across 6 

Bet. 11 & III across 2, 3 & 4 
Bet. IV & V across 1, 2 & 6 
Bet. IV & V across 1 to 6 in- 
clusive 








?^n 


40x66 




4ix,33 
79x33 


4Sx33 
79x33 




?^i 






??? 


i20x*66 






23 




80x30 
80x24 
33x24 


80x30 
80x24 
33x24 




?4 


Bet. V & VI across 11 & 12 
Bet. VI & VII across 28 






126x24 


?fi 






7x30 


?6 


do 


Bet. IV & V across 26,27«fe28 

Bet. X & XI across parts 27 

& 28 








38^x33 




27 


do 

do 










?:fi 


Bet. VIll & IX across 26, 27 
&28 














do 




?P 


Bet. X & XI across 28 and 
along boundary bet. Clute 
and Calder across Con. X 

Bet. 18 & 19 across V 








18x30 

11x15 

604x33 

27Jx24 






do 




30 










31 


Fox 


Bet. II&III across 7 to 12 
inclusive 


15x66 

92x66 
1x66 




27^x24 

68x24 
6x24 






German 




32 


Between 11 & 12 across V & 
VI 










92x66 


6x24 





1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



1G7 



MENT BRANCH— ANNUAL RFPORT OF WORK DONE, YEAR 1919 
DISTRICT 



r 



Gravelling 


Side- 
Ditching 

Ft. Linl. 


Oflf-take 
Ditching 
L.&W.&D 

Ft. Ft. Ft. 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Corduroy 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Repairs 
Distance Ch. 




L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


No. 


Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 


Size 
Ft. 


Wood 

No. Cone. 

Iron 


Len'th 
Ft. 


a 






















3 
175 * 


1 




2,244 
2,244 


198x2x2 
462x3x2 


22 
3 


wood 
vv^ood 


3x3 
3x2 


1 
1 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


150 

50 

100 




? 




















42 t 


3 












4 




1,900 
132 


















14 


5 






6 


v^^ood 


3x2 










6 




3,320x3x2 












7 




19,982 

12, 754 

1,500 


















8 






















9 












































10 




1,300 
2,772 

3,366 










































11 


310x8 




7 


wood 


4x3 










400 


P 


23x8 












13 




792 




8 


wood 


3x2 












14 
















15 








1 
27 

6 
3 


wood 
wood 

wood 


3x2 
3x2 

3x3 
3x2 












16 




2,640 




2 

1 


wood 
wood 


Reprd. 




230 

240 
60 


17 




1980x3x2 


40 




18 




5,280 










19 














?0 
























?1 
























?? 
























?3 




























750 
2,476 
4,450 

987 

5.726 




















94 






2 


wood 


3x2 












'5 




715x3x2 

30x2x2 

822x3x2 












26 




4 


wood 


4x3 












<?7 














'8 




















?9 




3,504 


192x3x2 


















W 




1,300 




















=^1 






3 


wood 


3x2 












32 



* 290 ch. x 24 ft. re-graded. t 20 ch. x 24 ft. re-graded. 



168 



EEPOKT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 
COCHRANE 



Township 



Location 
(On line between . , 
from to . . . 



Cutting 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 



Burning 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. Ch.Ft.' Ch. Ft 



Stump-: Grubbing Grading 

ing 
L,^^ I L. &W.|L. &W. 

Ch; Ft. 



Glackmeyer. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Lamarche . . 

do 

do 

Leitch 

do 
McCart 



do 



do 
Shackleton . 
do 



Blount & Glack- 
meyer 



Brower & Fox AcrossCons. I & II 



B rower & Kennedy 

Calvert & Clergue. 

Calder & Ottoway 

Clute & Calder.. 

Clute & Fournier 
do 

Clute& Glackmeyer 

Lamarche & Glack- 
meyer 

Lamarche & Four- 
nier 

Lamarche & Glack. 
meyer 

MeCart & Calvert 
and Newmarket. 



Bet. VI & VII across 12 ... . 

Bet. IV &V across 15 

Bet. 18 & 19 across II to IX 
Bet. 12 & 13 across I&IL. 
Bet. 24 & 25 across VII&VIII 

Bet. 6 & 7 across V 

Bet. 8 &9 across V& VI... 
Bet. V& VI across 7 &8... 
Bet. IV & V across 1, 2 & 3. 

Bet. IV & V across 2 

Bet. I & II across 1 to 5 in- 
clusive 

Bet. 11 & III across 1 & 2.. 



127x66 



58x66 



Bet. I & II across 1 to 4 in- 
clusive 

From Post Office to Fau- 
quier Station 

Trunk road along C.N. Ry . . 

Boundary Lines. 



In lots 19 &23. 



Lots 25, 26&27.... 

Lots 1 &2 

Lots 1 &2 "... 

Cons. I to XI inclusive 
part of lots 14 & 17. 

Lots 9, 10 & 11 

Cons. X, XI &XII.. 



81x66 



25|x33 
58x66 



40x66 



58x33 
30x30 
20x15 
10x7J 

62x33 



58x33 
30x30 
20x15 
10x7j 

62x33 



Scow installed at crossing Groundhog River 

i- I 



14X.30 

Ferry over Abitibi River repaired 



Across Lot 28 . 
Aci'oss Con. VI 



Across Lots 1 to 5 inclusive 

Aross Con. VI and along T. 
&N.O.Ry. 231.5 to 233.. 

Town of Cochi-ane, 12th Ave. 



49x66 



49x66 



20x30 



49x33 



20x30 



49x33 



20x30 
149x30 



160x80 



110x30 
10x30 



ENGLEHART 



1 


Armstrong 

Barr 


Bet. 4 & 5, across V 

Portage at mouth of Matta- 
wapika River 


80x66 
25x15 










? 


25x15 


25x15 
40x24 

120x24 




25x15 






Chamberlain 

do 

do 


25x15 


3 


Between 10 & 11 across V . 


160x20 


4 


Bet. 10 & 11 across 5 to 10. 
inclusive 


80x66 
40x66 




120x24 


160x24 


5 


Bet. 8 &9 across IV 


40x66 





1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



169 



DEJVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 

Continued. 
DISTRICT— Concluded 



G ravelling 


Side- 
Ditching 

Ft. Linl. 


Offtake 
Ditching 
L&W&D. 

Ft. 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Corduroy 




9? 


L. & W. 
Ch. Ft. 


No. 


Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 


Size 
Ft. 


No. 


Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 


Len'th 
Ft. 


L.&W. gg 

Ch. Ft. '■"§. 


5 




1 


1 


wood 




1 
1 


wood 
wood 


85 
40 






33 












34 
















20 


35 








1 


wood 


3x3 


1 


wood 


Reprd 




36 












37 


10\8 






2 






2 


wood 


Reprd 






38 


59x8 












83 


39 


23x8 




















40 




950 




















41 






















4'^ 
























43 












































:;';r;'... 






9,840 


656x3x2 


















44 




















45 




594 


















9 


46 












1 
1 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


Reprd 
16 
16 




47 
48 








2 
4 


wood 
wood 


3x2 
3x2 




20 
50 


4.9 




3.366 






50 














51 
























h?. 




11,550 

840 

5,544 

2,112 




44 


wood 


3x3 


1 


wood 


100 






53 










54 




3300x4x3 


4 
9 


wood 
wood 


3x3 
3x2 











240 
GO 


55 




1 


wood 


40 




56 


54x8 






57 


157x8 


3,630 
198 

11,738 




1 
3 


wood 
wood' 


4x3 
3x3 


1 
1 
1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


Repd 
40 
40 






58 


\ 


132x6x8 
196x4x2 






59 








60 


9x8 























DISTRICT 



25x15 


Ties laid an 


d 12 lb. ra 
600x3x2 

600x3x2 


Is and 
5 

1 
1 
8 


at each et 
wood 

wood 
wood 
wood 


d of tn 
3x2 

5x5 
3x3 
3x2 


imway 
1 

1 


a dock 1 
piles 
only 


ivas bui 
20 
24 


It of hewn timber 


100x10 
























170 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OP LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 
ENGLEHART 



t-l 


Township 


Location 
(On line between 


Cutting 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Burning 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Stumping 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grubbing 
L. & W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grading 
L.&W. 


from to ) 


Ch. Ft. 


6 


Chamberlain .... 

do 
Dack 


Bet. 6&7 " IV 

Bet. III&IV " 8&9.... 


40x66 


40x66 








7 








8 


Bet.V& VI " 1 &2 










80x20 


q 


do 


Bet. 8&9 " II 












10 


do 

do 


Across Lot 4, Con. IV 












11 


Bet. 7 & 8 across IV 












1? 


do 


Bet. V &VI " V&VI.. . 












1R 


do 


Bet. 6 & 7 " VI 

OnLotL Cons. III&IV.... 

Bet. 8 & 9 across IV 

Bet.4&5 " III and 
Bet. III&IV " 5 & 6 


40x66 

(High Fa 

40x66 


40x66 

lis Hill) 

40x66 


80x30 


80x24 


30x20 


14 


do 




In 


do 


40x24 

120x24 

40x30 


40x24 

120x24 

40x24 


40x20 


Ifi 


do 




17 


do 


40x20 


18 


do 


Across Lot 3, Con. VI 






40x20 


^^ 


Evanturel 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Ingram 


Bet. V & VI on Lot 10 








?0 


Bet. 2 & 3 across VI 






40x24 


40x20 


40x20 


?^ 


Bet. II & III " 7 & 8.... 






80x20 


?"> 


Bct.8&9 " V 










80x24 


??> 


Bet. IV & V " 8 & 9 










80x24 


?4 


Across 1,2,3 & 4 on Con. Ill 
Bet. II & III across Lot 2.. 
Across Lot 12 Con. Ill 












25 
?6 


40x66 


40x66 


40x24 


40x24 


40x20 


?7 


do 


Bet. 6 & 7 across 11 












?8 


Lorrain 


NorthCobalt to BigelowP,0. 
On Con. II across 12 to 15 
inclusive 










240x20 


?q 


do 


160x66 
561x66 

200x66 












do 




RO 


Bet. 4 & 5 across XI 

Bet. Ill & IV " 6 to 12 in- 
clusive' 


56^x66 








31 


Marter 


200x24 


200x24 






do 


320x20 


R9 








RR 


do 














R4 


do 














R5 


do 














Rfi 


do 














R7 


do 

do 

Marquis 

do 

do 

Otto 


On Lot 5 Con. I . . . 












R8 


Bet I & II across 10 

On Con. V across 1 to 7 in- 
clusive 


40x66 

100x66 
135x66 


40x66 
Road un 


40x24 
finished 




40x20 


39 






40 


Bet. IV & V across 4 &5.. 
Bet. V&VI ." 8,9 & 10 
On North side Lot 3, Con. V 
Bet. 2 & 3 across V 




41 










4? 




23x24 
23x24 






4R 


do ......... 










44 


do 


Bet. IV & V across 2 

Bet. L& II across 5 & 6 


40x66 








45 


Pacaud , . , 




40x30 


40x30 


40x20 


46 


do 


Bet. II & III " 3 & Bet. 2 
& 3 across III 


80x66 
50x66 
40x66 
80x66 
40x66 

60x66 


80x66 






do 




47 


Bet. 10 & 11 across VI .... 

Bet. 8 & 9 across V 

Bet, 8&9 " IV 

Bet. I& 11 " 1 

Bet. IV & V " 1, 2 & 3 & 

Bet. 2 & 3 " V 

White Reserve Road 








48 


Robillard 

do 

Sharp 




40x24 






49 


80x66 
40x66 

160x66 






50 








51 


do 


160x24 


160x24 




52 


Lee&VanOstrand 


160x20 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



171 



^k DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 
Continued. 
DISTRICT— Continued 



» 



Gravel- 
ling 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Side- 
Ditching 

Ft. Linl. 


OflP-take 
Ditching 
L.&W& D 

Ft. Ft. Ft, 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Corduroy 
L. & W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Repairs 

Dis- 
tance 

Ch. 


a 


No. 


Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 


Size 
Ft. 


No. 


Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 


Lsn'th 
Ft. 
























Q 








2 


wood 


3x2 












7 






3480x3x2 








5x10 


"■'so'" 


g 


















9 






1520x3x2 
















10 






1 
2 
6 


w^ood 
wood 
wood 


6x8 
3x2 
3x2 












11 


















12 






330x3x2 












13 














40 


11 








3 

3 
2 
1 


wood 

wood 
wood 
wood 


3x2 

3x2 
3x4 
4x3 










15 






165x3x2 












16 
17 
















18 








1 


Reprd 








10 


2JxlO 




225x3x2 


4 


wood 


3x2 




24x10 




20 












21 
























'>2 
























28 






10510x3x2 


















VI 








2 


wood 


3x2 












'5 






1520x3x2 












26 






3300x3x2 
2100x3x2 


















27 






17 


wood 


3x2 










10 miles 


^8 














9q 
























30 


9x10 




1845x3x2 


11 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 


3x2 
3x3 
8x9 
6x8 
6x10 
3x5 
5x9 
2x3 
3x4 


1 
2 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 


.214' 
16' 
20 






31 










32 












38 








84 


















85 


















86 








(reb 


uilt) 








87 






200x3x2 








88 
















39 
40 
























41 






2410x3x2 
600x3x2 


7 
5 


wood 
wood 


3x2 
8x2 












49 




46 chains 
(cleaned) 












43 




1 


re-cov. 














44 






250x3x2 


3 


wood 


3x2 









45 
















46 
























47 
























48 
























49 
























50 






1300x3x2 


5 


wood 


3x2 












51 














2 miles 


52 



13 F.M. 



172 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES — NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 
ENGLEHART 



a 

:2; 


Township 


Location 

- . 

(On line between 


Cutting 
L.&W. 

Ch.Ft. 


Burning 
L.&W. 
Cb.Ft. 


Stumping 
L.&W. 

Ch. Ft. 


Grubbing 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grading 
L.&W. 


from to ) 


Ch. Ft. 


53 


Boston, Gauthier 
& McElroy.... 

Armstrong and. . 
Beauchamp . . . 

Armstrong and 
Beauchamp . . . 
Chamberlain and 

Marter 

do 

do 

Chamberland and 

Pacaud 

Dack & Be'champ 


Larder Lake and Huronia 
Roads 










240x24 


54 


BOUNDARY LINES 
Boundary across IV & V . . . 










160x24 


55 

56 


Boundary acros s V 

Boundary across 1 «& 2 


40x66 


40x66 


40x24 


40x24 


40x20 


57 


" 11 












58 


" on Con. II 












59 


Boundary across 7,8,9,10&11 
Boundary " 1 & 2 

Boundary " VI 












60 

fir 


80x66 


80x66 


80x24 


80x24 


80x20 
80x20 



















HEARST 



1 


Casgrain 

do 

do 

do 

Hanlan 


Bet. 24&25 across pts.Il&III 
Bet. II & III 

15 16 & 17 












2 










60x22 


3 


Bet. 18 & 19 acros sI,II&III 

Bet. 24 & 25 " IV,V & VI 

Trunk Road across pts 23 to 

28 inclusive. 










11x22 


/[ 




160x24 




160x24 




5 








do 

TCpTidall 


140x24 


(i 


Bet. II&IIIacrossl6,17&18 
Trunk Road East of Hearst 
Bet. 18 & 19 across pt. XII. 


74x66 






74x24 




7 








g 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

O'Brien 












9 


Bet. 24 & 25 " X . . . . 










120x22 


10 


Bet 24 & 25 " pt. IX 












11 


Bet. VI&VII " 27,28&29 
Bet. V i& VI across 27,28&29 
Bet. 12 & 13 " VIII 


80x66 
76x66 






80x24 




12 








13 










14 


Bet.l8&19 " IX&pt.X 
Bet VIII & IX across 29 




94x24 




94x33 




15 






16 


Trunk Road along C.N. Ry. 

Bet. 22 & 23 across XI&XII 
Bet. 10 & 11 


400' roc 


k approac 


hes to br 


idges ave 


rage 4ft 


17 


do . 


40x22 
40x20 


18 


do 










27x20 


19 


do 


Bet. 24 & 25 across 9 & 10. 

Bet. VIII & IX across 25&26 

Bet. XIV & XV " 19&20. 

Bet. X «& XI " pt. 25 to 

29 inclusive 










20x20 


^0 


do 








35x33 


27x22 


•>1 


do 

do 










22 


95x66 


96x66 




95x24 





1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



173 



DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 
Continued. 

DISTRICT— Concluded 



Gravelling 
L.&W. 
Ch Ft. 



Side 
Ditching 



Off-take 
Ditching 
L.&W&D. 



Culverts 



Bridges 



Ft. Linl. Ft. Ft. Ft. 



No. 



Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 



Size 
Ft. 



No. 



Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 



Ijen'th 
Ft. 






Repairs 

(Dis- 
tance) 

Ch. 



66x6 
64x66 



600 



Old trestle 



Old trestle 



1000x3x2 



s removed 



615x3x3 
removed 



130x3x2 



wood 

wood 

wood 

repaired 



wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 



wood 



wood 
wood 



3x3 
3x2 
3x2 



3x2 

3x2 

5x3i 

5x4~ 

5x4 

2x11 

5x3 



6x8 



5x3 
3x2 



tructed 45x10 



9 miles 



2Smiles 



53 



54 



55 



DISTRICT 



i 



60x10 






















1 






200x10x4 
1600x4x4 


3 
3 


Temp. 
Temp. 














9 




18400 














S 
















1 




9900 


900x4x4 
50x4x3 


6 


Temp. 














5 
















6 






















IJ miles 


7 




1400 



















8 




200x4x3 
100x4x4 


3 


Temp. 




5 


wood 


16 






q 




3600 






10 














• 






n 
























P 




3400 

12400 

2080 

10460 

5280 
1550 
9400 

3200 

1800 




















13 




200x4x4 


















14 




















15 




7Jx4x3 

6x4x3 

9x4x3 

18x4x4 

1x4x3 

3x4x3 


3 

5 
6 
4 
2 
3 
2 
3 


wood 

Temp. 

wood 
Temp, 
wood 
Ten) p. 

wood 
Temp. 


4x4 


2 
1 


steel 
wood 


120 
80 
33 




4J miles 






16 
17 




4x4 












18 














19 




10x16 












90 




12x16 












^1 















- 


22 



174 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— ^NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 

HEARST 



B 


Township 


Location 
(On line between 


Cutting 
.L&W. 
Ch.Ft. 


Burning 
L.&W. 

Ch. Ft. 


Stumping 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grubbing 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grading 
L. &W. 


from to ) 


Ch.Ft. 


23 


O'Brien 

do 


Bet. X «& XI across pt. 25 to 
29 i nclusive, and line bet' 
O'Brien and Owens 












?4 


Bet. VII & IXacross 19to 24 
inc. and bet. 18 & 19 across 

IX : 














do 




?5 


Bet. 18 & 19acrossIX&pt.X 
Bet. 7 & 8 across pt. X .... 
Trunk Road across 1,2.3 & 4 
Bet. 24&25 across XV to 
XVIII inclusive 








45ix24 
26x33 
40x22 




?.(S 


do 


26x66 


26x66 






?.l 


Owens 






?8 


do 












do 


80x22 


?f) 


Bet. XVI & XVII across pt.24 
Bet. XIV&XVacross24&25 
Trunk road across Townsite 
Trunk " pts. 21,22 
& 23 


15x66 


15x66 




15x24 


15x22 


Rn 


do 






31 


Shackleton 

do 

do 

Way 


45x66 


59x66 




59x30 


73x24 


32 




45x24 


33 


Bet. 24 & 25 across pts. XI 
& XII 


61x66 


61x66 
25x30 




61x24 

123x30 

25x30 


23x24 


34 


Trunk road across 13 to 17 
i nclusive 








do 




35 


Trunk Road across 20 at 
milage 45 C.N. Ry 










do 




3fi 


Bet. X&XI across 5 to 8 
inclusive 












do 


60x22 


37 


Bet. VIII & IX across 1, 2, 3, 
4 5 & pt. 6 


129x66 






129x24 






do andHanlan 
do 




38 


Trunk Road across 1 to 16 
inclusive 








39 


Bet. II & III across 3, 4 & 5 
Bet. II & III " I&2.. 
Bet. X&XI " pt. 8 


74x66 
49x66 










40 


do 










41 


do 










4? 


do 


Bet X & XI " pts.7&8 
Bet. 24 & 25 " I 












43 


Williamson 

Hanlan & Way . . 

do 

do 
Kendall & Way . 
Lowther & Way. 
O'Brien & Owens 

do do 
Owens & William s 










60x22 


44 


BOUNDARY LINES 

Diversion at Lake Lot 1 & 
pt. 2 










80x22 


45 


Across pt. lot 5 












4fi 


" 6&7 








35x24 




47 


" V & VI 


120x66 
73x66 








48 


" 9, 10 & 11 










49 


" XII, XIII & XIV. .. 








40x22 


50 


" XI 


40x66 


40x66 




40x24 




51 


on " 25 & 26 




26x22 










1 





MATHESON 



Beatty 

do 
do 
do 
do 
Benoit 



5. 6 



Bet. II & III across pt 
& pt. 7 

Bet. 11 & 12 across II 

Bet. " " I 

Bet. 9&10 " II 

Bet. 9 & 10 " III 

Bet. I & II " 4 to 8 in- 
clusive , 



80x66 



80x66 
80x66 



87x66 
80x66 
80x33 
80x66 
80x66 



87x33 
80x33 
80x33 
80x33 
80x33 



87x33 
i0x33 
80x33 
80x33 
80x33 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



175 



DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 

Continued. 

DISTRICT— Concluded 



Gravelling 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Side- 
Ditching 

Ft. Linl. 


Oflf-take 
Ditching 
L&W&D. 

Ft. Ft.Ft. 




Culverts 




Bridges 


Corduroy 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Repairs 

Dis- 
tance 

Ch. 




No. 


Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 


Size 
Ft. 


No. 


Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 


Len'th 
Ft. 






17820 
23760 


15x4x3 
30x4x3 


















^3 




















94 




















?5 
























^6 




7650 

10560 

2000 

6600 

200 


309x4x3 
1200x4x3 


6 

6 
3 


Temp. 

Temp. 
Temp. 














97 
















?8 












800 




?9 














30 




300x4x3 
400x4x3 
200x4x3 


4 
4 
3 


Temp. 
Temp. 
Temp, 














31 
















3? 


















33 


















34 






















* 


35 






3000x4x4 


3 


Temp. 




1 


wood 


12 




i mile 


36 




2000 
900 




37 




1100x4x4 








4 


wood 


16 




4Jmiles 


38 












39 
























40 




300 
1400 
3000 




















41 






















^?. 






3 
3 


Temp. 
Temp. 














43 




100x4x3 
2000x4x4 














44 


















45 






















46 
























47 
























4» 




16460 


15('x4x3 


4 


Temp. 














4<> 
















50) 




3300 


1600x4x3 


3 


Temp. 
1 wood 














51 




6x6 















DISTRICT 

























1 
























2 
























3 
























4 
























5 




9110 


831x2x2 






• ••••• 












6 



50 ft. Ry. Siding. 



17G 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 
MATHESON 



Township 



Location 

(On line between 

from to ) 



Cutting 


Burning 


Stumping 


Grubbing 


L. & W. 


L.&W. 


L.&W. 


L.&W. 


Ch.Ft. 


Ch. Ft. 


Cli. Ft. 


Ch. Ft. 



Grading 
L.&W. 
Ch.Ft. 



7 


Bowman 


Bet. 6&7 across 6 (N. J).. 












8 


do 


Bet. 4 & 5 S. of Ry. crossing 
Bet. 6& 7 across V&VL., 












9 


do 












10 


do 


Bet. 4&5 " VI 












11 


do 


OnNJLot 5 Con VI 












12 


do 


Bet. Ill & IV across 3&4.. 










80x24 


13 


do 


Bet. 2 & B across IV (S. ^). 
Bet. IV&V " 9, 10&pt.8 

Bet 10 & 11 " VI 

Bet. 2 & 3 across V 


'idoiee" 

80x66 


"'80x66' 
80x66 


"166x33' 
80x33 


"166x33' 
80x38 


4x24 


14 


do 




15 


do 




16 


Bond 




17 


do 


Bet. II & III across 3 

Bet. 2&3acrossIII 

Bet. 2 &3 across IV 

Bet. 2 & 3 across V 

Trunk Road, R.R. crossing 
to Wahtaybeg River 


18x66 
50x66 
80x66 
50x66 


18x66 
50x66 
80x66 
50x66 








18 


do 








19 


do 








20 


do 








21 


Carr 






,_-- ■ 




do 




22 


Bet. II & III across 1&2 .. 












23 


do 


Bet. 2&3 " II 












24 


do 


Bet. 4&5 " I&II.. 












25 


do 


Bet. 4 & 5 " V & VI 

Bet. V&VI " 5 to 9 in- 
clusive 










160x24 


?6 


do 














do 


164x^4 


?.l 


Bet. V&VI across lO&ll. 
Bet. 3 & 4 across I, II & III 
Bet. IV&V " 5 


80x66 




80x33 


80x33 


80x^0 


28 


do 






?,^ 


do 












80 


do 


Bet. 4 & 5 " Con. VI pt. 

Bet. 10 & 11 " II, III & 

pt. IV 




20x33 

130x66 
60x66 


20x33 

130x33 
60x33 


20x33 

130x33 
60x38 




Rl 


do 


130x66 
60x66 






Gorrie 




?,'> 


Bet. 2 & 3 across VI 

Bet III & IV " 8 




.33 


Hislop 




34 


do 


Bet. Ill & IV " 6 to 10 in- 
clusive 


200x66 


200x66 


200x33 


200x33 






do 


200x24 


35 


On Con. I across 6 (Trunk rd) 
Bet. V&VI " lO&ll... 




36 


do 












37 


do 


Bet. II & III " 12 & 13... 










80x24 


38 


do 


Bet. 9 & 10 " II & pt. Ill 
Bet. 11 & 12 " IV 




120x33 


120x33 


120x83 




39 


do 


41x24 


40 


Playfair 

do 


Bet. 2 & 3 " V(S. i) ... 




20x66 


20x33 


20x88 




41 


Bet. 7&8 " VI 






42 
43 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Stock 


Bet. V&VI " 9, 10 & 11. 
Bet. V&VI " 7&8 


120x66 


120x66 


120x33 


120x83 


8.3x24 


44 


Bet.8&9 " VI 










80x24 


45 
46 


Bet. 2&3 " VI 

Bet. 5 & 6 " V 


80x66 


80x66 


80x83 


80x38 


80x24 


47 


Bet.3&4 " II 

Bet.3&^4 " III 

Bet. IV&V " 6pt. 7.... 


40x66 
80x66 











48 




80x33 


80x33 




49 




22x24 


50 


Bet. I&II " 6 


40x66 
40x66 
80x66 


40x66 
40x66 
80x66 








51 


do 


Bet. I&II " 5 








5^ 


do 


Bet. 4 & 5 across V 

Trunk Road acros s III &I V 
Bet. 8 & 9 across IV (S. J). 


80x83 


80x88 




53 


Taylor 




54 


do 













1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



1 77 



DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 
Continued. 

DISTRICT— Continued 



i 



Gravelling 


Side- 
Ditching 

Ft.Linl. 


Oflf-take 
Ditching 
L. &W. 

Ft. Ft. Ft. 




Culverts 




Bridges 




Corduroy 
L. &W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Repairs 

Dis- 
tance 

Ch. 


2; 


L. &W. 

Ch. Ft. 


Wood ' ^. 
No. Concrete '^f 
Iron *^*- 


No. 


Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 


Len'th 
Ft. 


50x8 






















7 


40x8 






















8 






















2 miles 

i mile 

* 


q 






















10 






















11 








2 

3 


wood 
wood 


4x6 
3x4 










19 


















13 
























14 
























In 














1 


wood 


74 


(4 acre s 


cleared) 


16 














17 
























18 
























}^ 
























?0 


160x8 






4 


wood 


4x4 










2 miles 


?1 


80x8 














y.?. 


80x?'. 






















?3 


120x8 




















2 miles 


M 








10 
2 


wood 
wood 


3x4 
6x6 










?5 


















?lfi 
























?!7 






















3 miles 


?H 








5 


wood 


6x10 


1 


wood 


22 




?^ 












30 
























31 
























3? 














1 


wood 


144 






33 








1 
16 


wood 
wood 


10x10 
14x3 






34 








1 


wood 


20 




12 miles 
1 mile 


35 








1 


wood 


8x8 










36 
















37 
























38 
























39 
























40 












1 


wood 


58 








41 


















4? 








7 

8 


wood 
wood 


3x4 
3x4 












43 


















44 


















45 










, 














46 
























47 
























48 








2 


wcod 


4x4 












49 


















50 
























51 




1518 




















59 






1 
6 


wood 
wood 


3x4 
4x4 










2 miles 
■J mile 


53 








i 


wood 


""'25 




54 



Old camps removed. 



178 



EEPOET OF THE 



No.. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES— NORTHERN 

YEAR 1919. 
MATHESON 



B 
12; 


Township 


Location 
(On line between 


Cutting 
L. & W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Burning 
L. &W. 

Ch.Ft. 


Stumping 
L.&W. 

Ch. Ft. 


Grubbing 
L.&W. 
Ch. Ft. 


Grading 
L.&W. 


from ito ) 


Ch.Ft. 


no 


Taylor 


Bet. IV & V across 12 












5R 


do 


Bet.2&3 " I&II.... 
Betlll&IV " l,2,3&pt.4 
On N. J Lot 9 Con. V 


160x66 


120x66 
140x33 


120x33 
140x33 


120x33 
140x33 




S? 


do 




n8 


do 




m 


Walker 


Trunk Rd. across lots 9&10 
On N. J Con. II Lot 12 


82x66 


82x66 


82x33 


82x33 


82x20 


60 


do 




fii 


do 


Bet. IV &V across 9, 10 & 11 
Bet. IV & V across 12 


120x66 


120x66 


120x33 


120x33 




6? 


do 


40x24 


68 


Beatty & Hislop 
do 


BOUNDARY LINES. 
Across 4 to 13 inclusive .... 












64 


" pt. 8&9 & pt. 11 












65 


Beatty & Carr . . 
Benoit & Cook . . 
Bond & Stock . . . 

do 
Bond & Currie . . 

do 

do 

do 
Bowman & Carr 
Bowman & Currie 
Carr & Taylor.. 
Clergue& Walker . 
Currie & Taylor 
Stock & Taylor. 

do 

do 

do 

do 


" N. i Con. IV 












66 


" 5, 6, 7, 8&pt. 9 

" 1&6 


20x66 




20x33 


20x33 




67 






68 


" 1 to 6 inclusive 












6<^ 


" IV 












70 


" III 


15x66 


15x66 

130x66 

50x66 








71 


" Ill&pt. IV 


130x33 
50x33 


130x33 
50x33 




7? 


" V'& pt. IV 






73 


" 5 to 12 inclusive .... 






74 


On Con. V 












75 


Across I to IV inclusive. .. 












76 


" I & S. J 11 












77 


" Ito 12 inclusive.... 












78 


" Con. VI 












7^ 


" II to VI inclusive 
" I 












80 












81 


" N. i II&S. HII.... 












82 


" N.J IV 













PORCUPINE 



Mountjoy 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Tisdale 

do 

Mountjoy -xTisdle 
do do 



Trunk Road Timmins to 
Mattagarai 

Bet 4 & 5 across pt. II & III . 

Bet. 2&3acrosslV, V&VI 

Along river " pts. V & VI 

Bet. 4&5 " " III.... 

S. Porcupine to Davidson 
Mine 

S. Porcupine to Timmins.. 

Boundary across III & IV.. 
do do V&VI... 



90x66 



75x66 
29x66 



40x30 
75x66 



170x33 
20x30 
75x24 
29x24 



170x33 



75x24 
29x24 



40x24 



120x66 80x66 80x30 80x30 

MACADAM 



1 




Road from Elk Lake to 
Gowganda 


120x66 
65x66 


120x66 
6x66 


120x33 
6x33 


120x33 
6x33 


207x20 


2 


Road from Swastika to 
Ki rkland Lake 


151x24 









1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 179 



DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— ANNUAL REPORT OF WORK DONE, 
Concluded. 

DISTRICT— Concluded 



Gravelling 


Side 
Ditching 

Ft. Linl. 


Oflf-take 
Ditching 
L.W.& D. 

Ft.' Ft. Ft. 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Cjrduroy 
L.&W. 

Ch. Ft. 1 


Repairs 

Dis- 

tanse 

Ch. 


B 


L. &W. 
Ch. Ft. 


No. 


Wood 

Concrete 

Iron 


Size 
Ft. 


No. 


Wood 
Cone. 
Iron 


Len'th 
Ft. 


40x8 






















rt'^ 
























56 
























57 






1333x2x2 


















58 






5 


wood 


4x4 












59 
60 
61 
62 
















h mile 




























2 


wood 


3x4 


























5 miles 


63 
61 


80x8 




















20x6 




500x3x2^ 


3 


wood 


3x4 










8 miles 


65 












66 














2 


Repai 


red 






67 






1056x3ixC 
594x3.Jx2 


1 
2 


wood 
wood 


3x4 
4x4 




3 miles 


68 




9073 


1 


wood 


76x14 




69 








70 
























71 




8100 




















79 












1 


Rep 


aired 




4 miles 


73 








3 
5 
1 


wood 
wood 
Reprd. 


3x4 
3x4 




71 






1695x3Jx3 










4 miles 
IJ miles 
6 miles 


75 


120x8 












76 




















77 


80x8 




















78 






















5 miles 
1 mile 


79 






















80 


80x8 




















81 


60x8 























82 



DISTRICT 



36x8 






















1 




















1000x16 
4446x16 


1 mile 


2 




9600 


1320x3x5 


5 


wood 


3x3 


1 


wood 


40 


3 




4 
























f> 


60x80 






















6 


20x12 




















* 


7 


80x8 






















8 
























q 


ROADS 

















4500 
1572 



23500 
27984X 


1.5 miles 
1.62 " 


10 
15 

4 
6 
1 

1 
3 


iron 
Recon'd 

Con. 18" 

" 24 

" 30 

twin 30 

reconstd 












11750x10 

t 

3800x14: 










1750 











• 20 ch. X 12 ft. Rock Sheeting. 



t 7 miles repaired. t 4 miles repaired. 



180 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Repoet on the Constkuction and Maixtexance of Highways and Bridges 
Under the Provisions of the Northern and North Western 
Ontario Development Act 1912 and Amendments. 

(During the Season of 1919.) 

To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests: 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of work done on the 
construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under the provisions of the 
above Acts during the season of 1919 : — 

Operations were carried on in the Districts of Eainy Eiver, Kenora, Port 
Arthur and Fort William, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Joseph Island, Algoma, Sudbury, 
Nipissing, Parry Sound, Muskoka and the Counties of Eenfrew and Simcoe. 

During the season considerable work was done in the Eainy Eiver Valley; 
23 miles of new road were cut out and constructed; during the winter of 1918-19 
considerable gravel was hauled for re-surfacing of trunk roads. Several of the 
trunk roads running north and south into the newW settled townships were ex- 
tended, and tap drains dug to assist in draining off the swamp lands as well as 
the roads. On the 1st and 2nd of July last, over 6 inches of rain fell in the two 
days, causing great damage to the culverts and small bridges and in some instances 
washing out the roads. This damage had to be repaired and the main trunk roads 
were constantly dragged throughout the summer when required, and re-surfaced 
with gravel where they became rutted. There was considerable immigration into 
this district, and many of the new settlers in the back townships are handicapped 
for want of roads. The main trunk roads are now in fairly good condition but 
large expenditures will still be required in this district, to meet the requirements 
of the incoming settlers. 

In the District of Kenora the trunk road l)et\veen Wabigoon, Dryden, Oxdrift 
and Vermilion Bay was worked over, re-constructed in places, and surfaced with 
gravel. In this district there is a pressing want for more roads in the agricultural 
country between Wabigoon and Dryden on the Canadian Pacific Eailway and the 
Grand Trunk Pacific Eailway in the vicinity of Quibell Station. This country 
is becoming settled up and it will be necessary, in order to retain settlement, to 
spend considerable money in the construction of new roads. 

In the Port Arthur and Fort William Districts larsre expenditures were made 
in re-surfacing with gravel the main trunk roads : and also in constructinsf. new 
roads. The International or Scott highway to Dnluth was put into good condition. 
The construction of a new road running east from Port Arthur towards Loon 
Lake, Dorion and Nipigon was beofun ; about 15 miles of this road was partly 
constructed along the Hydro-Electric transmission line between Port Arthur and 
the Nipigon Eiver. 

On the trunk road between Sault Ste. IMarie and Sudbury, considerable M'ork 
was done. The gap between Algoma Mills and Cutler has been partially com- 
pleted, nnd repair work wa> done between Cutler and Sudbury; and between 
Algoma ^lills and Sault Ste. Marie. 

On St. Joseph Island, the work commenced three years ago was continued ; 
and the trunk roads are now in good condition. 

In the Sudbury District, new roads were constructed, and roads previously 
constructed were kept in repair. Considerable expenditure was made in tlie 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOHESTS AND MINES. 181 

milling district around West Shining Tree, to meet the requirements of mine 
owners, who are now beginning to develop the gold mines in that district. Several 
miles of new road were also constructed to accommodate the settlers in the out- 
lying townships. The trunk road between Sudbury and North Bay was kept in 
fairly good condition; large quantities of gravel and crushed rock were used in 
re-surfacing this road in the worst places; the road was frequently dragged. A 
new road was constructed between Warren on the Canadian Pacific Railway, south 
to the Village of St. Charles. The old road between Rutter Station on the Toronto 
Branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway, running east about 30 miles to Lake 
Nipissiiig, was partly re-constructed and graded. 

The trunk road between North Bay and !Mattawa was re-graded and le-sur- 
faced in places, and continued east of Mattawa towards Chalk River. Between 
Pembroke and Petawawa, the road was kept in repair; and between Chalk River 
and ^lattawa, about 25 miles of the old Pembroke and Mattawa Road was Avidencd 
and re-graded. On the trunk road from North Bay, south to Bracebridge, a 
large expenditure was made in reconstruction, and in diverting the old road 
where it was found necessary in order to improve the grades. The worst parts 
of this road have been completed as far south as Washago. On the old road 
running west from Trout Creek Station on the Grand Trunk Railway, towards 
Commanda, construction was commenced, and about 12 miles partly completed. 
The road running west from Powassan to Nipissing Village was continued. 

The following is a more detailed statement of the different roads constructed 
and repaired in the various districts during the season ; and appended to this 
report is a statement of the expenditures and an approximate estimate of the 
amounts which will be required to construct and maintain roads during the 
season of 1920. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. F. Whitsox, 

Commissioner. 



DLSTRICTS OF PARRY SOUND AND MUSKOKA. 

'Trunk Head from, Callander, South : 

Work was continued on this road throughout the winter of 1918-10. Several 
of the worst parts of the road, where gravel could not be procured conveniently 
during the summer season, were, surfaced with gravel ; more particularly in the 
vicinity of Barriedale, Burk's Falls, Katrine, and Huntsville. The work was also 
continued throughout the summer season up to the end of October. Over 40,000 
cubic yards of gravel were used in re-surfacing this road. From Callander to 
Powassan the road was dragged at different times throughout the season when 
required. Between Novar Station, on the Grand Trunk Railway, and Huntsville, 
a diversion of 5 miles was made along the right-of-way of the Grand Trunk 
Railway, southerly from Novar Station, to avoid very heavy grades on the old road 
running west and south from Novar. The new ''oad as now constructed and 
gravelled is a great improvement; there are very few grades on it, and the length 



182 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

of the road has also been cut down considerably. The road is now in fairly good 
condition for automobile traffic over this section, which was considered one of 
the worst sections- on the road between North Bay and Bracebridge. From Utterson 
the road was diverted westerly to strike the Parry Sound road north of Beatrice; 
and from the diversion, the road extended southerly, passing through Falkenburg. 
In this section, the old road was widened, ditched, graded and gravelled in places. 
From Novar north to Burk's Falls, the road was gravelled in places, graded and 
ditched; more particularly in the section near Katrine, where there was a bad 
section, extending over 7 miles. North and south of Burk's Falls, the road 
was re-constructed in places and graveled. At Sundridge a large stone culvert 
was constructed, and north of South Eiver Station a bridge was built across the 
South River, with a span of 47 ft., with stone abutments; and a second bridge, 
over Black Creek, a tributary of the South Eiver, was constructed with stone 
abutments, with a span of 23 ft. A stone bridge was also built over a small creek 
with a deep valley, at the new diversion north of Melissa Station. Immediately 
north of Huntsville, several small diversions and rock cuts were made, and con- 
siderable surfacing with gravel done. The road between Bracebridge and North 
Bay is now in fairly passable condition for automobile traffic, although there 
still requires considerable surfacing to be done with gravel. North of the diver- 
sion of the trunk road with the Parry Sound road, north of Beatrice, a rock cut 
was made near the Skeleton Hill, along the shore of a small lake. This has greatly 
improved the grade on the road from Eosseau to Bracebridge. It will take a 
considerable expenditure during the season of 1920 on this road, more particularly 
between Novar and Bracebridge, to put the road into good condition. 

Between Bracebridge and Gravenhurst, no work was done on the trunk road 
during this season. It was found, however, that south of Gravenhurst near the 
Severn Eiver and Washago, the old road, which had been built many years 
ago, had become badly rutted for want of attention. In this section, extending 
a distance of over 6 miles, operations were started in September from Severn 
Bridge, southerly through the village of Washago. The road was regraded, widened 
in places and brushed out; about 11/^ miles of the road was re-surfaced with 
crushed rock and gravel. Owing to the wet season, this road was not completed, 
and the work has since been continued, re-surfacing with crushed rock. 

DISTEICT OF PAEEY SOUND. 

Nipissing Road: 

Between Powassan Station on the Grand Trunk Eailway north-westerly to 
Nipissing Village, a distance of about 10 miles, which was graded two years ago 
and gravelled in places, was resurfaced in the wjorst places, 2,000 ciibic yards of 
gravel being used. This work was performed during the winter season. Through- 
out the summer the road was dragged and kept in fairly good condition. This 
road is part of the Powassan and Eestoule Eoad it extends westerly for a distance 
of over 40 miles, it is one of the oldest roads in the district. West of Nipissing 
the road was in bad condition; it passes through' a country which has been settled 
for over 25 years. The country is broken and rocky, but in places there is a very 
fine agricultural land with fairly prosperous settlers. These settlers have no other 
access to the railway but by this particular road. An exploration was made of 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



183 



the road and it was found that immediately west of Nipissing village there was 
a very bad grade, rocky and almost impossible to go up or down with heavy loads. 
A diversion was made to the north to avoid the heavy grade. The road has been 
cut out and it is hoped that next season the Department will be in a position to 
finish the road and continue the work as far west as Eestoule. Three small bridges 
with stone abutments have been constructed near Nipissing village, across a branch 
of the South Eiver. 

Trout Creek and Loring Road : 

This road follows the old colonization or timber road constructed in the 
early days of settlement in the district. It is the only road from the village of 
Loring, Golden Valley settlement and the village of Commanda, by which the 




Entering the town of Mattawa, on the Trunk Road, District of Nipissing. 

settlers can reach the railway. The road passes through a typical Parry Sound 
country, broken and rocky in places, with sections of good land in the valleys. 
In some sections, more particularly that immediately west of Trout Creek Station, 
the soil is a light sandy loam or sand. This class of country extends westerly for 
about 5 miles. The old road constructed many years ago and mostly repaired 
by settlers, was in bad condition; very little attention had been paid to drainage 
or grading. The road has been widened, ditched and graded for a distance of about 
8 miles, where it ended in a rough, rocky, hilly section and where a diversion had 
to be made for a distance of 5 miles to the north, along the valley of a small 
stream. On this new road a fairly good grade was found ; the road has been 
cut out and grubbed and is now ready for grading as far as the village of Com- 
manda. This diversion leaves the old road about 8 miles west of Trout Creek 
Station and touches the old road again at the village of Commanda, beyond which 



184 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

no new work has been done upon the old road. West of Commanda to Loring 
the road passes through Golden Valley, in which there is a good settlement of 
fairly prosperous farmers, the land in many places being first class. In other 
sections the road passes through a rocky sparsely settled country where the road 
will have to be diverted in some instances, in order to better the grades. This 
country has been settled in places for the last 40 years and the only access to the 
railway, for these settlers, is along this road. At the present time it is a difficult 
matter for the settlers to reach a market except during the winter season. The 
first 8 miles of the road, commencing at Trout Creek Station, has been well graded 
and gravelled in places; 21 iron culverts and 6 wooden culverts were placed. 
Several of the hills were cut down to improve the grade. The hills on both sides 
of the South River bridge were cut down and the grade very much improved. 
Owing to the wet season unfortunately we were unable to complete the gravelling 
of some sections of the road and this will require to be done later on. 

Distress Road : 

On the main road from Sundridge to Magnetawan village a diversion was made 
around what is locally known as " Distress Hill " ; 1 mile of new road was cut 
out and gravelled, in order to improve the grade. The old road passes over a 
rocky hill which it was found impossible to cut down. Over 1,000 yards of gravel 
were used in surfacing this road. 

Townships of Conger and Freeman : 

The road from Parry Sound, running south to Lake Joseph and Lake Muskoka 
was extended from Gordon Bay, along the Canadian Pacific and Canadian Xorthern 
Railways to Foote Bay, a distance of about 5 miles, through the townships of 
Conger and Freeman. This road connected with a fairly good automobile road 
from Foote Bay to Bala, a summer resort on Muskoka Lake. The road followed 
had been cut out several years ago, but was grown up and unused, except during 
the winter season. The road was cut out, widened and stumped ready for grading. 
It passes through a comparatively level country, with no bad grades and, when 
coinpleted, will give the citizens of the town of Parry Sound and villages along 
the railway access to the summer resorts in the Muskoka Lake country. It will 
also assist the settlers in getting to a market for their produce. The road requires 
to be graded and ditched. 

The total amoant expended on the trunk road, and other roads in the Districts 
of Parry Sound and ]\lu.skoka during the season was $144,043.33. 

DISTRICT OF mPISSING. 

Mattaiva-Kloch Road: 

The old travelled road known as the Mattawa and Pembroke road commencing 
about 3 miles east of the Town of Mattawa and extending east for a distance of over 
12 miles, was widened, ditched and graded to a point about 2 miles east of Klock 
Station on the C.P.R. On this road 5 corrugated iron culverts, 10 wooden culverts 
and 6 stone culverts were placed. The road was well ditched and graded, 1 bridge 
was repaired, 1,433 cu. yds. of gravel were used in resurfacing the worst parts 
af the road. Between the eastern terminus of this work and the western end 
of the work performed west of Chalk River there is a long section of road which 
will require considerable repairing and grading. It is part of the old timber 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AXD MINES. 



185 



road and although it is passable for cars during the dry season it is unsuitable 
for traffic during the early spring or late in the fall of the year; it will require 
brushing out, grading and surfacing with gravel in places. 

Callander-Mattaiva Road : 

This road was constructed by this Branch in 1913 and 1914. During the 
interval some repair work was done in places by this Branch, but little or nothing 
by the settlers along the road. There is considerable traffic over the road and it 




View on the Pembroke and Petawawa Trunk Road. 

became badly rutted in places. The distance between Callander and Mattawa 
is about 40 miles. The road was re-graded throughout its entire length this 
season ; some of the worst grades cut down ; the road widened in places and re- 
surfaced with gravel where required; the ditches were deepened and cleaned out 
and several new culverts placed. The road is now in fairly good condition, 
although there are still some parts of the road which will require re-surfacing 
with gravel later on. 



186 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



North Bay-Trout Lake Road: 

Between North Bay and Trout Lake Mills about 2 miles of this road were 
re-graded and ditched in places and 1 mile re-surfaced with gravel, but owing 
to wet weather in October the road was not finished. 




A view of the Trunk Road between the town of Pembroke and Petawawa 
Military Camp, showing a stone road re-surfaced with coarse 
gravel. \ 

Township of Ferris Road: 

The road from North Bay to Trout Lake south side was repaired and part 
Te-surfaced with gravel. 

Trunk Road from North Bay to Callander: 

This road was re-surfaced with gravel, 2,200 cu. yds. gravel being used. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 187 

North Bay to Sudbury Trunk Road: 

This road, was dragged and repaired throughout its entire length, 80 miles 
between the Towns of Sudbury and North Bay; in places it was re-surfaced with 
gravel. East and west of Meadowside 3,070 cubic yards of gravel were hauled by 
train from a point on the Canadian Pacific Eailway west of Sudbury from the 
Canadian Pacific Railway pit at Phelan. North of the Village of Markstay, 1,055 
cubic yards of gravel were used in re-surfacing II/2 miles of the road leading into 
the village. 

In the Townships of Kilpatrick and Caldwell, east of the Village of Verner^ 
about 31/^ miles of the road were re-surfaced, 3,205 yards of gravel being used. 
In sections west of Sturgeon Falls the road was also re-surfaced where it had 
become rough, 900 cubic yards of gravel and 1,203 cubic yards of stone being 
used. Several culverts and small bridges were repaired. Between the Town of 
Sudbury and the Village of Coniston a stone road was constructed about four 
years ago. The road was re-surfaced with crushed rock in places for a distance 
of six miles, and with coarse gravel for two miles ; 1,435 cubic yards of crushed rock 
and 600 yards of gravel were used; five corrugated iron culverts were placed and 
the road was well rolled with 12 ton roller and is now in first class condition.. 
The bridge across the Veuve River, about three miles west of Warren Station 
on the Canadian Pacific Railway, which was commenced last season, was com- 
pleted. The bridge has a clear span of 60 feet with stone abutments; 500 cubic 
yards of rock were used in filling in these abutments. 

In the vicinity of Meadowside, where the country is very flat, ditches had 
to be deepened and five iron culverts were used to assist in the drainage. The- 
road between Sudbury and North Bay is now in fairly good condition, although 
there are still places which will require gravelling; more particularly in that 
portion between Sturgeon Falls and Meadowside. 

The amount expended on the above work during the season was $69,484.31. 

. COUNTY OF RENFREW. 

Trunk Eoad, Mattawa to Pembroke: 

Betiveen Pembroke and Petawaiva and Chalk River to Bissett's Creek. — The- 
trunk road between the Town of Pembroke and the Petawawa Military Reserve, 
in length about 12 miles, which was constructed a few years ago, was placed under 
a foreman, with a small gang of from 3 to 5 men and from 1 to 2 teams; who 
were engaged throughout the season commencing about the 1st June in improving 
and maintaining this road. The road was continually dragged when required, and 
new gravel was spread on the road wherever it became rutted. In places, the road 
was widened where necessary, and the ditches deepened. Over this road there is a 
very heavy traffic. This system of constantly keeping the roads in repair was 
found very satisfactory on this particular road; and throughout the entire season 
the road was in splendid condition. 

Twenty miles of this road were brushed out and ditched, and 15 miles graded; 
44 corrugated iron culverts, 8 stone culverts and several wooden culverts were 
placed; 1 cedar bridge with 14 ft. opening and stone abutments was built, with 
300 yds. of rock filling; 1 stone culvert bridge 44 ft. wide and 7 ft. high was? 
constructed across Barr's Creek, with walls on each side 120 ft. long, 20 ft. wide 



188 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



and 31/2 ft. high; also 1 culvert 6^/^ miles west of Chalk River with rock fUl 
100 ft. long, 12 ft. wide and oi/o ft. high. This road was well ditched and 
surfaced with gravel in the worst places. It passes through a country that has 
been sparsely settled for over 50 years. The road as now constructed, was origin- 
ally built and known as the Peml)roke and Mattawa Road ; and was used by the 
lumbermen for transporting supplies from Pembroke west to IMattawa during the 




The Interprovincial Bridge crossing the Ottawa lUver at the Joachim 
Rapids, near the Trunk Road from Pembroke to Mattawa. 

early sixties. The land along this road is a light sandy loam, stoney and rocky 
in places; and while there are sections with fairly good agricultural land, taking 
the country as a whole, it is not very well suited for agricultural purposes. There 
is, however, considerable traffic on this road during the winter season in taking 
supplies from Pembroke west to Deux Joachim, where there is an interprovincial 
iron bridge spanning the Ottawa River; and from this bridge northward through 



1919-2a DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



189 



Quebec Province there is a timber road extending for 100 miles or more through 
the pine and spruce forests. The work as performed this season extended as far 
west as the branch road leading to the interprovincial bridge, which is distant 
only a few miles from our trunk road. From about the same point, the road 
branches southerly a few mil^es to Moore Lake Station on the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. This branch road to the station was bruslied out, grubbed in places, 
and the worst grades cut down. This station is where the settlers along the trunk 
road within a reasonable "distance market their supplies. The road from Chalk 
River west, passes in places over sandy plains, grown up Avith a thick second growth 
of pine and other timber, Avhich even now have a commercial value. The road 
passes in sight of the Ottawa River throughout a good portion of its length, and 
the scenery is very fine. At present there is considerable automobile traffic 




On the banks of the Ottawa River, near the Interprovincial Bridge, between Ontario 
and Quebec, across the Joachim Rapids: one of the most noted transporting 
points in the early days of lumbering in the Ottawa Valley. 

between Mattawa and Pembroke, although the road west of where our work ter- 
minated and Klock Station, is almost impassable in places. This road was repaired 
in places in the vicinity of Bisset Station, where it was cut out and widened for 
a distance of 6 miles and in the vicinity of Adelard Station, 5 miles of the road 
were brushed out, and 3 miles stumped and stoned, ready for grading. 

The expenditure on this work during the season amounted to $24,421.55, 



DISTRICT OF SUDBURY 



(I arson to Coniston lioad 



This road was cut out and graded 3 years ago. There was considerable heavy 
traffic over the road between the Mond Nickel Company's smelters at Coniston 
and the Company's mines at the village of Garson, the distance being a little over 



190 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 



5 miles. This road was all well surfaced with crushed rock, over 5,000 cubic 
yards of rock being placed thereon, and well rolled with a 12-ton roller and sur- 
faced in places with gravel, of which 1,067 yards were used. Several corrugated 
iron culverts were placed and the road is now in good condition. 

Sudbury to Garson Village: 

This road was constructed 7 years ago. A diversion, however, was made on 
the road a few years ago, but never surfaced. This diversion reduced the distance 
and grades considerably; 3,729 cubic yards of crushed rock were used on this road 
and 1,200 yards of gravel, the road being well rolled and corrugated iron culverts 
placed where required, and a bridge, with an 18-ft. span, built on lot 12, con. 6, 
township of Neelon. This bridge was constructed with stone abutments. The 
road between Sudbury and Garson is now in good condition. 

Sudbury to Hanmer : 

The road between Sudbury and Hanmer, which was constructed 7 years ago, 
became badly rutted, as the municipalities along the road have taken little or no 
interest in maintaining it. The road was re-graded and ditched in places and 
surfaced with gravel and slag from the mines, 2,044 cubic yards of slag and 219 
yards of gravel being used. The repairs along this road extended for a distance 
of 8 miles. 

Hanmer to Capreol Road: 

A few steep hills were cut down and the road was repaired and re-ditched 
and parts surfaced with gravel, 414 cubic yards of gravel being used. This road 
was constructed about 7 years ago and became badly rutted in placesi, owing to 
the fact that little or no repair work has been done by the settlers along the road. 

Sudbury to Azilda Road: 

This road was repaired and dragged for a distance of 6 miles, 400 cubic yards 
of gravel being used. 

Coppercliff to Creighton Road: 

This road was dragged for 6 miles and repaired for 3 miles. Upwards of 500 
cubic yards of gravel were used in repairs. It is now in first class condition. 

Warren to St. Charles Road: 

Between Warren Station on the Canadian Pacific Eailway and the village of 
St. Charles, the distance is about 91/^ miles, and between these two villages the 
old road was, in many places, almost impassable for traffic during the spring and 
fall seasons. Along this road there is a good settlement, more particularly in the 
vicinity of the village of St. Charles, and a great deal of farm produce passed 
over the road. The road required grading, ditching and widening and the grades 
had to be cut down ; 91/^ miles of the road were graded and about 5 miles were 
surfaced with gravel. Corrugated iron culverts were placed, where necessary, and 
6 large wooden culverts repaired or re-built. A small wooden bridge was re-con- 
structed and the road is now in very fair condition. 



1919-20 DEPARTMEJs'T OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



191 



MacFarlane Lake Road : 

Part of this road between con. 6 and 7, Township of Dill was reconstructed, 
graded and gravelled for % mile, and in the Township of Broder the road was 
repaired for 3 miles, graded for 3i/4 miles and gravelled for 21/2 miles; 2 small 
bridges were repaired and 22 iron culverts placed. 




A view of the International or Scott Highway between Fort William 
and Pigeon River, showing road surfaced with shale and gravel. 



Richard Lake Road (A branch of the Sudbury and MacFarlane Lake Eoad) :• 

This road was brushed out, graded and repaired for 21/^ miles; 6 culverts 
were repaired and 5 new culverts placed; also 1 wooden bridge repaired: the road 
was gravelled in places where required. 



192 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Townslii'ps of Balfour and Dowling : 

The road along the town line between these toAvnships was cut, brushed, cleared 
and stumped for 1 mile; and ditched for 2 miles and culverts repaired. 

Wahnapitae Road: 

Between Garson and Wahnapitae Lake, for a distance of 6 miles, the road 
was repaired and surfaced with o-ravel in some places. 




A view looking south on the International or Scott Highway, showing 
the mountain ranges overlooking Lake Superior. 



Rutter-Noelville Road: • . 

This road commenced at a point on the Sudbury and Toronto Branch 
Canadian Pacific Eailway at Eutter Station and extends easterly for 20 miles to 
the west arm of Lake Nipissing. The old road has been in use for nearly 20 years ; 
it passes through, in places, first-class agricultural land, it being one of the best 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 193 

farming sections in that district. The country is fairly level, the soil is of clay 
and clay loam, broken in places with rocky ridges; but on the whole, the country 
is well adapted for agricultural purposes and there is a prosperous settlement 
along the road. The road in many places has never been graded. Work was 
commenced early in September on the worst part of the road, which is within 11^ 
miles of Canadian Pacific Railway, where the country is very rocky, more par- 
ticularly at the crossing of the Murdock Creek. This portion of the road was 
improved, and on each side of the bridge for a considerable distance was well 
graded and the rock cut down; the crossing is now in first-class condition. About 
41/^ miles of the road was graded and 2 miles re-surfaced with gravel; 17 new 
culverts were put in and over 1,200 cubic yards gravel used. The road requires 
considerable expenditure yet. The only outlet the settlers have in this district is 
by Rutter Station in the summer and winter seasons, or by boat across Lake 
Nipissing in the summer season. There is a large section of fine agricultural land 
tributary to this road and 1 would advise further expenditure in the way of 
grading and gravelling. 

Larch wood to Levack: 

This road was graded and repaired for a distance of 2 miles. 

Shining Tree Road : 

This road leaves the Canadian National Railway at Westree Station, 73 miles 
north of Sudbury, and runs in easterly and north-easterly direction to West 
Shining Tree Lake and VVasapika Lake. The distance to West Shining Tree Lake 
is about 23 miles and Wasapika Lake 28 miles. The road as far as West Shining 
Lake was cut out 6 years ago and the first 16 miles graded and corduroyed in 
places. No repairs were done during the interval, and the road was badly broken 
up. During the last 2 seasons there has been considerable heavy traffic over the 
road by the miners taking in mining machinery and supplies. ITie road passes 
through a country that is heavily timbered with Jack Pine, Spruce, Poplar and 
other timber; the road is comparatively level with very few bad grades; the soil 
is either light sandy loam, sand, or gravel, until within a few miles of West Shining 
Tree Lake where the country becomes rocky. There are a few good gravel pits along 
the road but road making material in some places is difficult to procure. The 
road has been regraded and ditched in places; new culverts have been constructed 
and about 8 miles re-surfaced with good gravel; the road to West Shining Tree 
is now in fairly good condition; beyond that point to Wasapika Lake it requires 
stumping and grading and in places widening. From all appearances, judging 
from the amount of work that has been carried on in this mining district during: 
the past season, there are good prospects of the district making a mining camp. 
Several Mining Companies have done considerable work on their properties this 
season, and a few of them have put in small plants, and the indications are that 
there will be considerable activity in this gold mining district in the near future. 
All of their machinery and supplies will pass over this road. 

St. Charles to Hagar Road: 

A winter road was cut out between the townships of Duimet and Appleby, 
south of the Canadian Pacific Railway to connect the village of St. Charles with 
the Canadian Pacific Railway at Hagar Station. A few hills were cut down, and 



194 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

grades improved. This road will require to be improved in order to make it fit 
for summer traffic. 

The total amount expended on the above work during the season was 
$122,763.94. 

Sault Ste. Marie-Sudbukt Trunk Eoad, and Work in the District of Algoma, 
IN THE Vicinity of Sault Ste. Marie. 

Sault Ste. Marie-Sudhury Trunk Road, Algoma to Cutler: 

Work was commenced in June on the gap, 19 miles in length, between Algoma 
and Cutler. This portion lies in difficult country from a construction standpoint, 
being rough and rocky with numerous swamps. 

Three camps were installed, one working east from Algoma, one west from 
Cutler and a double camp working in both directions from Spragge. 

At the end of the season 11 miles had been completed, of which 6 were 
gravelled. Of the remainder, 5 miles were partially completed so as to be passable, 
but still requiring a considerable amount of work, including one rock cut of 
400 yds. and 3 smaller ones, drainage and the installation of some permanent 
culverts. Three miles lying along the Serpent Eiver remain to be built. 

The section was in general built to a width of 24 ft., reduced to 20 ft. on 
cuts and fills. Grades have been with three exceptions, kept below 8 per cent., 
these three being 10 per cent. Sharp turns have been avoided and a good view 
obtained. 

Seventy corrugated metal culverts were installed during the season, the major- 
ity of these being bedded in concrete to prevent heaving. One 6 ft. x 6 ft. con- 
crete culvert, 32 ft. long was built at Foz Creek, and one 8 ft. concrete arch 
65 ft. long at Shephard's Creek. Four stone culverts were also built. There 
remain on the ground to be installed, 20 corrugated metal culverts. 

During the season a stone crushing plant was authorized, but delivery was 
not obtained until late in the season. A re-built tractor sent with the outfit was 
not sufficiently powerful and was replaced with a new machine. This plant has 
been installed at Shephard's Creek where there is a rock slide of over one hundred 
thousand tons of naturally broken trap unweathered and of the right size for the 
crusher. Quarry costs are thus almost eliminated. The same conditions obtain 
at a number of other points between Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury. Owing to the 
lateness of the season only a test run was made with the plant. But six weeks 
running in the spring will supply the material for that part of the newly con- 
structed road, for which no gravel is available. After that the plant can be 
moved to different points as required. 

In addition to the three miles uncompleted and the five miles partially com- 
pleted there remains to be built during the coming season, three small reinforced 
concrete bridges of 18 ft, span. 

With a sufficiently early start this section can be opened for traffic early 
in July of next year, 

Sault Ste. Marie to Algoma Mills: 

This portion of the road, 102 miles in length, is under charge of a main- 
tenance overseer and has been continually patrolled and kept in repair. In addi- 
tion to maintenance' betterments are being made. During the season, in addition 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



liC) 



to steady dragging, 4,000 yds. of gravel were spread on a total distance of 28 
miles. Two thousand tons of trap rock from Bruce Klines Quarry were used for 
repair purposes. Twenty culverts were installed and 8 miles of the road were 
brushed out. Ditches were cleaned out where necessary, and new outlets built. 

Sudburij to Cutler: 

This part of the road, 83 mi-les in length, required considerable work. .During 
the season, 27 miles, between Copper Cliff and Nairii, were repaired and gravelled 
in places. 

Between Webbwood and Espanola, a section, which has always given consider- 
able trouble, o large washouts were filled and other repairs made. 




A view sliowiug ihe Hearst Range of mountains, ritoiiig uver l.uuu lecL along the 
International or Scott Highway, overlooking Lake Superior. 

Between Webbwood and Massey one mile of gravel was laid and repairs made. 
Between Walford and Massey, SVL' miles were re-graded and gravelled, together 
with one mile of outlet ditching and some miscellaneous repairs. 

Ten culverts in all were installed. 



^St. Joseph Island: 

Operations were carried on during the winter months in hauling gravel on to 
roads, which had l)een graded the previous season, and as soon as the spring opened 
up the roads previously constructed were gone over with the road drag, and 
[oiperations carried on throughout the season. Operations were chiefly confined 
■to the A line, across lots 19 to 25; on the line between lots 5 and 6, across Con- 
cessions P, Q, Rand S; between lots 10 and 11, across Concessions N, and P: 



196 KEPOET OF THE No. 3 

on the U line, across lots 10 to 15 and lots 31 to 23 ; on the D line, across lot 5 
and across lots 17 to 21; on side roads 20 and 21, across Concessions 13 and 14. 
Besides re-ditching and re-grading parts of these roads, necessary culverts were 
placed. The roads now constructed connect the two main shipping points or 
villages on the island, Eichard's Landing and Hilton ; and give access from the 
main settlements on the island to these villages. The roads on tne island are now 
in good condition. They will, of course, require to be maintained and extended 
as settlement progresses. During the season over 15,000 cu. yds. of gravel were 
used in re-surfacing these roads. The roads were all well dragged during the 
summer season, as necessity required and are now in gOod condition. 

Between the villages of Hilton and Eichard's Landing, both of which are 
situated on the north shore of the island, the road runs north across Campement 
D'Ours Island to a point opposite Kensington Point on the main land. The 
passage is made by means of a scow ferry. From Kensington, there is a road 
^onnecting with the Sault Ste. Marie-Sudbury Trunk Eoad at Desbarats Station 
on the Canadian Pacific Bailway. This is a road, however, on which a considerable 
amount of repair work is necessary. The work outlined has been practically 
completed, with the exception of a few short roads on the island, and a cut at 
the north end of the Campement D'Ours Eoad, work on which has been sus- 
pended, owing to the weather conditions this fall. On St. Joseph Island and 
approaches $22,248.67 has been expended during the season of 1919. 

Goulais Bay Road: 

The Goulais Bay Eoad runs northerly from Sault Ste. Marie to the settlement 
of Goulais Bay and thence to Bellevue on the Algoma Central Eailway. One and 
a half miles were graded and one mile gravelled. Also on an alternative location 
to the biggest hill on the road with a grade of 20 per cent., which had been cleared 
in 1917, work was started. This involved a cut of about 4,000 yds., with a cor- 
responding fill, giving a final grade of 8 per cent. This work, when about half 
done, had to be suspended on account of unfavourable weather conditions. 

Uydal Bank Road: 

On this road, running northerly from the Town of Bruce Klines, through 
the Village of Eydal Bank, and thence to Ophir and McFee's Valley, a consider- 
able amount of work was done during this season. 

Between Bruce Mines and Eydal Bank % of a mile of road was re-graded 
and 11/4 miles of gravel spread. Three culverts were repaired. 

Between Eydal Bank and Ophir 1/2 mile of new road was graded and 1% 
miles of gravel laid. 

On the McFee's Valley portion % of a mile of gravel was laid. 

^yharencl^ffe Road: 

This road runs northerly from the Village of Little Eapids to the WJiarencliffe 
Settlement, near Mississaugi Eiver. The northerly portion, in particular, is 
extremely rough and at certain seasons almost impassable. It was intended to 
cut down and improve some of the worst hills and re-grade and drain some of 
the worst of the other portions. Owing to diflSculty in obtaining sufficient labour, 
this being restricted to the settlers themselves, the programme for the season was 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 197 

not carried, out. Three-quarters of a mile was re-graded and gravelled. Three 
bridges and some culverts were repaired and re-covered, the cutting down of one 
of the worst hills partially done. 

Belleviie-Searchmont Survey. 

On instructions from the Department, during November, a survey and pre- 
liminary location of a road near the Algoma Central Eailway, from Bellevue to 
Searchmont was made. 

The greater portion of this Sault Ste. Marie work was carried on in charge 
of Mr. John L. Lang, Civil Engineer; the total cost, including the St. Joseph 
Island operations above referred to, amottnted during the year to $163,937.68. 



DISTEICT OF THUNDEE BAY. 
In the Vicinity of Pout Aijthur and Fort AVilliam. 

International or Scott Hightvay : 

AVork was commenced on this highway early in April. Several landslides had 
occurred along the steep mountains adjacent to the road, more particularly at a 
point known as the Horn Hill; in man}- instances the old ditches along the foot 
of the mountain were filled up, and had to be cleaned out and the road widened. 
In some places it was found necessary to re-surface the road with gravel or shale; 
13,700 cu. yds. of gravel or shale rock were used for this purpose, from the inter- 
national boundary at Pigeon Eiver, north for 35 miles to the Slate Eiver Valley. 
This road was also dragged several times, or after every rainfall, and kept in first- 
class condition; 15 new culverts Avere built where it was found necessary, and 
all the ditches were opened up or cleaned out; the road was left in first-class 
condition last fall. 

Over this road there is now a large tourist traffic; no less than 17,000 people 
are reported to have crossed to and from Minnesota, Duluth and Minneapolis 
during the season. It has become one of the most popular tourist roads between 
Ontario and the United States in the western parts of the Province. The cities 
of ]*ort Arthur and Fort William are now deriving a great benefit from this road, 
besides the settlers along the route. It is a road, however, that will require two 
small working gangs of 4 or 5 men each and a few teams, dragging and gravelling 
the road during the summer season; as there are no organized municipalities along 
the southern 30 miles of this road to maintain it, and very few settlers. There 
is considerable fine agricultural land along the road, which in a few years may be 
settled upon; the soil is a heavy clay, admirably adapted to the growth of clover 
and alsike seed. 

Townships of O'Connor and Maries: 

Graded road between Concessions 3 and 3, across lots 1 and 3, Township of 
Marks; and across lots 13, 11, 10, 9, 8 and 7, and through lots 6, 5 and 4 and 
location Y, Concessions 1 and 2, Township of O'Connor, to the Silver Mountain 
Eoad; 6 miles more or less. This road was repaired, hills cut down, ditched and 
graded. 

14 F.M. 



198 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Township of Conmee: 

Brushed out, grubbed, ditched and graded the road between lots A and 1, 
across Concessions 1 and 2 and south part of 3, 3V2 miles; and westerly along the 
line between Concessions 2 and 3, across lots E, D, C, B, A, 1, 2, 3, and 4, 4i/^ 
miles to Hume Station. On this road, hills were cut down, culverts repaired, and 
the worst places gravelled; two small bridges and 5 culverts were built. 




On the Internationa] or Scott Highway, showing the remains of the original 
Pine Forests West of Lake Superior. 



■Township of Mclntyre, Oliver Road: 

This road was dragged and re-graded from the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway 
crossing in the Township of Mclntyre west to Murillo Station on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, a distance of 6 miles; 4,322 cu. yds. of gravel were used in the re- 
surfacing of this road. The road is now in first-class condition between Port 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



199 



Arthur and Kakabeka Falls, a distance of about 30 miles, the road drag having 
been used upon it whenever required during the summer season, 

Toivnship of Gorham: 

The road between lots 14 and 15 across Concessions 1, 2 and 3, and between 
lots 16 and 17 across Concession 4, 4 miles were re-graded, gravelled and repaired; 
17 culverts were placed and 2 bridges repaired, 900 cu. yds. of gravel being used 
in re-surfacing. The road between lots 6 and 7, across Concessions 1, 2 and 3 
was repaired; and across Concessions 4 and 5 was graded 1% miles. The road 
between Concessions 2 and 3 across lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, 2 miles, was widened, 
graded and repaired. Between lots 10 and 11 across Concession 4 and the south 
quarter of Concession 5, the road was grubbed, graded and repaired I14 niiles. 




The first automobile to pass over the International or Scott Highway, crossing the 

Pigeon River at low water. 



(ioiliaui and McGregor Toivnlinc. 

On the townline between the Townships, of Gorham and McGregor, across 
part of Concession 1 and Concessions 2 and 3, the road was repaired and re-graded 
2^2 miles, 

Gorham and McTniyre Townline: 

On the townline between the Townships of Gorham and McTntyre, the road 
across Sections 8, 7, 6 and 5 was cut out for a winter road, 4 miles. 

Township of ^yare: 

Across the noi"th part of lot 19, Concession 2; across lot 19, Concessions 3 
and 4; across lot 20,' Concessions 4, 5 and the south half of 6; the road war. 



200 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



cut out, graded and repaired; 4 culverts were built, and 4 small bridges repaired. 
Between Concessions 3 and 4, across lots 4 to 7, the road was cross-layed for 1,300 
ft., and cut out 1% miles for a winter road. 

Township of Gillies: 

Silver Mountain Road. — This road from Hymers to South Gillies was re-graded 
for 2 miles between lots 6 and 7 across parts of Concessions, 4, 5 and 6; a new 
diversion road was constructed around the hill on Concession 3, a distance of 
1 mile; 1,300 cu. yds. of gravel were used in re-surfacing this road. The road 
from Stanley to Hymers was gravelled for a distance of 4i/^ miles, 3,209 cu. yds. 
of gravel being used. This road connects Hymers and Gillies with the Twin Cities. 




•The inspector visiting a typical log school-house on the International or Scott Highway. 

Township of Neehing: 

Industrial or Prison Farm Diversion. — This road was cut out, grubbed and 
•graded 3i/2 miles, and gravelled % mile; a bridge was built over the mouth of a 
•creek flowing into Kaministiquia River, with steel girders 45 ft. span, and stone 
and concrete abutments ; 3 culverts -were placed. 



Township of Paipoonge: 

Grubbed and graded diversion road west of Stanley Junction, connecting 
with Arthur Street Road to Fort William and Kakabeka Falls, between lots 34 
and 35, Concession 1, and across the south half of lot 13, and across lots 14 and 
15, Concession 1, to Stanley Junction, a distance of 1 mile. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 201 

ToivnsMp of Pearson: 

Eoad between lots 6 and 7, Concession 5 was repaired, old crosslay removed, 
and the road covered with clay, for a distance of i/4 mile, 

Arthur Street Road: 

This road was repaired from a point % mile west of the Canadian Pacific 
Eailway crossing, west to Kelly Hill, 5 miles ; the road was re-graded and gravelled 
in places. 

Schreiber: 

Eepaired bridge with new stringers, flooring and railing. 




On the Oliver Trunk Road west of Port Arthur; road surfaced with shale. 

^Vhite River: 

Made rock fill across narrows in small lake about l^/^ miles north of White 
Eiver Station along the Canadian Pacific Eailway water line; filled 125 ft. long, 
with 15 ft. opening; also constructed diversion around hill at south end of fill. 

Port Arthur and Loon LaJce Road: 

This road commences at the eastern limit of the City of Port Arthur near 
the Pumping Station, close to the line of the Canadian Northern Eailway, and 
extends easterly along the old Black Bay Eoad, which was cut out and partly 
graded maiiy years ago. It follows the Black Bay Eoad for about 9 miles. This 
road almost parallels the Canadian Northern right-of-way on the north side; 
it also follows along the Hydro-Electric pole line between Port Arthur and the 
water power on the Nipigon Eiver. The road now being constructed extends 



202 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



in an easterly direction from the end of the old travelled road, crossing the 
Mackenzie River about 1/4 ni^le north of the Canadian Northern Railway, and 
continues easterly to a point a few miles south-west of Sibley Station on the said 
railway. Operations ceased about the end of October at this point. The western 
part, or old travelled portion of the road, was widened in places and surfaced 
with gravel; from the end of the old travelled road, a new road was cut out, 
grubbed and graded; preparations were made for the erection of a bridge across 
the Mackenzie River. The road after it passes Mackenzie River, extends through 
fairly good agricultural country, although the soil is light and sandy. The country 
is an old brule, grown up with second growth poplar, birch, spruce, etc.; this 
area has been burnt over several times. From Sibley Station, the projected road 
extends along the edge of the Hydro-Electric pole line to Loon Lake Station on 




A view on the Trunk Road from Kakabeka to Hymers, south-west of Fort William. 



the Canadian Pacific Railway. At this point there is a large summer resort; 
thence the road follows in an easterly direction almost parallel to the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, until it reaches the agricultural section east and west of Dorion. 
Fourteen miles of this road were operated upon last season ; about 4,000 cu. yds. 
of gravel were used in re-surfacing the road ; several culverts were constructed. 
This road when completed will give access to all the fine summer resorts along 
the shores of Thunder Bay, Black Bay, Nipigon Bay, Nipigon River and Loon 
Lake; and will open up a large section of agricultural land in the Townships of 
Dorion, Stirling and Nipigon; and give access to the splendid water powers of 
Nipigon River. For some time to come, however, the benefits to be derived arc" 
more in the opening up of the agricultural section east and west of Dorion Station 
in the above named townships. 

The total amount expended in this district during the season was $107,877.55. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



203 



KENOEA DISTRICT. 

Number of miles of new roads brushed out, grubbed and graded 17 

" " new roads partly graded 4 

" " old roads burned 10 

" " old roads repaired 15 

" " old roads gravelled 21 

" corrugated iron culverts built 58 

" wooden culverts built 35 

" new bridges constructed 14 

" old bridges repaired 1 

During the season of 1918 the trunk road between the Town of Dryden 
(Canadian Pacific Railway) and Oxdrift Station, a distance of 7 miles, was 
ditched and graded, but not gravelled. During the months of February and March, 




A view along the Trunk Road through the Sl^te River Valley, south-west of 

Fort William. 



1919, the greater portion of this road was re-surfaced with gravel, 3,800 cu. yds. 
being used, operations ceasing on the breaking up of sleighing. This work ceased 
near Oxdrift Station. Early in May, operations were again started, and the 
gravel was spread to proper grade, and the work of grading, ditching and re- 
locating continued westerly along the trunk road as far as Eagle River Station. 
The work consisted of cutting out and widening the road, cutting down hills to 
proper grade, building culverts, grading and diverting the road where it was 
found necessary, in order to avoid steep hills. The road is now well ditched and 
graded, but will require considerable gravel in places, before it will meet the 
requirements of heavy traffic during the wet seasons. In this section of the road, 
32 corrugated iron culverts were placed; 15 wooden culverts and 3 small bridges 
constructed. Two swamps in Eton Township, l^^ miles in width, were corduroyed 



204 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



and ditched on both sides, besides two offtake ditches dug, one nearly a mile in 
length and the other 800 ft. The distance from Oxdrift Station to Eagle Eiver 
Station is 10 miles, through a splendid farming country. 

While operations were being carried out to the west of Dryden, a camp was 
operating east of Dryden, about II/2 miles west of Wabigoon Station. The work 
consisted of burning off the brush oh the road which was cut out the previous 




A typical view of a road cut out and newly graded through the virgin 
forest; near Wabigoon, District of Kenora. 



season, stumping, grubbing, ditching, grading and gravelling. The road is now 
completed through to Wabigoon, well graded, ditched and surfaced with gravel. 
Twenty-six corrugated iron culverts, 17 wooden culverts and 4 stone culverts 
were placed; and the following 6 bridges were constructed: No. 1 bridge, 75 ft. 
long, 8 ft. high; No. 2, 300 ft. long, 30 ft. high; No. 3, 65 ft. long, 12 ft. high; 
No. 4, 45 ft. long, 10 ft. high; No. 5, 36 ft. long, 8 ft. high; No. 6, 36 ft. long, 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LAXDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



205 



8 ft. high. These bridges are all constructed of red pine, and painted. There is 
now a first class gravel road between Dryden and Wabigoon, a distance of 13 miles. 
Between Wabigoon and Eagle River the road passes through, in most instances, 
a first class farming country. The soil is chiefly clay or clay loam. The farmers 
are making good, progress in this vicinity, judging from the large clearings and 




Gravelling a new road between Dryden and Wabigoon, in the 
District of Kenora. 



good buildings. The country appears to be best adapted for the growth of clover 
and alsike seed, and hundreds of acres are to be seen along the road. All classes 
of farm produce are grown in this District very successfully. There are still, 
however, thousands of acres of fine land in this Section open for settlement, 
or, at least, uncultivated and apparently not settled on. 
15 F.M. 



'^00 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

Trunk Road, Vermilion Bay (Canadian Pacific Railivay) North to Quihell Station 
(Grand Trunk Pacific Railway). 

This road was constructed a few years ago, and had become badly cut up in 
places, owing to the heavy traffic, and required considerable repairs. The old 
ditches were cleaned out and deepened, 10 new culverts were placed, and one small 
bridge constructed. Four miles of the road were re-surfaced with gravel and 4 
miles partly repaired, commencing at Vermilion Bay, going north. Owing to the 
wet weather, however, it was impossible to finish the work; and there remain 2 
miles of the road south of Quibell badly in need of gravelling. At this point 
there is little or no gravel to be found, and it would be advisable to have this 
work completed during the winter months when the gravel could be drawn much 
more cheaply. The distance between Canadian Pacific Railway and Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway is 10 miles. 




Settler's home, Kenora District. 

In the vicinity of Quibell, in the Townships of Wabigoon and Redvers, there 
is a section of fine agricultural land, with settlements of well-to-do farmers. The 
settlers, however, are badly handicapped for want of roads. Owing to the diffi- 
culty of procuring labour this summer, we did not succeed in constructing the 
miles of roads in this section of the country that were laid out for the season's 
work. During the early part of the season the farmers were all busily engaged on 
their farm work, and during the latter part of the season wet weather retarded 
the road work. This section of country, between Wabigoon and Eagle River is 
well adapted for the growth of timothy, clover and alsike. Large quantities of 
seed are grown here every year. 

Aubrey Township: 

One and a half miles of road were grubbed between lots 10 and 11, Con- 
cession 6, near Minitaki Station; and a wooden bridge 96 ft. long constructed 
across Beaver Creek. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



207 



Velhll TownsJiip: 

Keewatin and Pellatt Trunk Eoad. This road, constructed a few years ago, 
became badly rutted in places, and was repaired where required, re-graded in 
places, 4 new culverts placed, ditches cleaned out and 540 yds. of gravel used 
in re-surfacing the worst parts. 

Kenora and Keewatin TrunJc Boad: 

This road was repaired, several dangerous places along the road were widened 
out and 444 loads of crushed rock were used in re-surfacing the worst parts of the 
road. The road is now in good condition. 




A typical view of a settler's garden near Oxdrift, in the Wabigoon section, 

District of Kenora. 



Winnipeg River Bridge: 

Owing to the heavy rains during the first week in July, the waters of the 
Lake of the Woods rose extremely high, and caused a considerable washout at 
the oast abutment of the steel bridge crossing the west branch of the Winnipeg 
River. The bridge was constructed about 18 years ago. The approach to the 
eastern abutment was a dry stone wall about 33 ft. high and 80 ft. long. The 
wall was built with very little batter, and was held together by rods of iron 
passing through the roadbed and bolted to timbers. The timbers rotted, and 
owing to the extremely high water, the entire wall slid out into the river, thus 
stopping communication between the two towns. A new wall was constructed 100 
ft. long, well pointed with cement, and is now in first class condition. 

Kenora to Redditt Station Survey: 

An exploration survey was made with a view to locating a trunk road between 
Kcjiora and Redditt Station on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. First, a routie 



208 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



was explored on the East Melick trunk road to Eedditt. This passed through a 
broken, rocky country, unsuitable for agricultural purposes in most instances, and 
diflScult and expensive to build. The second route explored followed the West 
Melick trunk road, which is graded as far as lot 13, Concession 4, Township of 
Melick. This route was found somewhat more satisfactory than the East Melick 
trunk road, although it passes through a country with a comparatively small per- 
centage of land suitable for agricultural purposes. In some instances, the country 
is very rocky, and a road very difficult to construct. It was found, however, that a 
road could be constructed connecting Eedditt Station with Kenora by this route, 
opening up a fair percentage of agricultural land, which road might, in the future, 
be extended westward along the Grand Trunk Pacific Eailway to connect with 
Minaki on the' Winnipeg Eiver. 

$52,092.48 was expended on the roads in this district during the season of 1919. 




A view on the Trunk Road in the Rainy River Valley. 



DISTEICT OP EAINY EIYEE. 



Number of miles of new roads cleared , 22.5 

" old roads brushed 19 . 

" roads grubbed 27 . 

" new roads graded 16 . 

" old roads re-graded 42 . 

" roads gravelled 45 . 

culverts ibuilt 76 

culverts repaired 30 

bridges built 9 

bridges repaired 5 

iron pipes laid 2 

miles of tap drains dug 4.5 

" road ditches dug 19 . 

" corduroy laid 2 . 

Amount expended $137,102 26 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS, FOKESTS AND MINES. 



209 



Township of Mclrvine : 

The road north of Section 31 was graded for 1 mile and the brush cut on 
the sides and tap drains cleaned out. 

Township of Crozier: 

The Trunk Eoad was gravelled north of Sections 13, 14 and 15 for a distance 
of 21/2 miles. The Trunk Road east of Section 21 was gravelled for % mile. On 
road between Sections 18 and 19, one mile of road was grubbed, and ^/^ mile 
ditched and. graded, new. Between Sections 17 and 18, % ™ile of road was 
cleared and stumped. On road north of Sections 34, 35 and 26, 2 miles of road 
was partly re-graded. 



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All kinds of garden produce flourish in the District of Kenora near D'ryden. 

Township of Woodyatt : 

On River Road across river lots 13 to 43, 2 miles of road were gravelled by 
contract, 1,570 yards of gravel being used. Two and a half miles of this road 
were re-graded. A pile bridge, span 40 ft., was built on River Road between lots 
15 and 16, and approaches filled 100 ft. Two washouts repaired on road between 
lots 32 and 33. Two hundred feet of filling put in at bridge between Sections 
8 and 9, and 1 washout repaired on Little Fork, LaVallee Road. Two pile culverts, 
span 10 ft., were bujj^t on river road and 2 culverts on road between river lots. 
32 and 33. 

Township of Devlin : 

North of Sections 17 and 18, one mile of road was gravelled, and north of 
Section 18, 80 rods of ditch dug on one side of road; alsoj 8 culverts built north 
of Section 18 and 1 north of Section 17. North of Seetipos 3, 4, 5 and 6, 2 
miles of road were re-graded, and north of Sections 4, 5, and 6, 2y^ miles of 
road were gravelled by contract, 1,422 yds. of gravel being used. Two culverts 
built north of Section 30, and 1 north of Section 29, and 1 mile of Trunk Road 



210 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



gravelled east of Section 29. On road east of Sections 27, and 34, li/o miles of 
road were re-graded and 1^ miles of the above road were gravelled by contract, 
1,037 yds. of gravel being used. One-quarter mile of Trunk Road was gravelled 
north of Sections 29 and 30. Six hundred feet of road were gravelled north of 
Section 21. On road between Sections 19 and 30, % mile of road was cleared. 

Township of Burriss : 

On road east of lot 5, across Con. 3, 4, and 5, l^^ miles of road were re- 
graded. Two pile bridges with a span of 12 ft. were built between lots 10 and 11, 
Concession 1, and approaches filled in, a distance of 450 ft. at each bridge. Road 
across lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, between Concessions 5 and 6, 2 miles of road re-graded. 
One-quarter mile re-graded between lots 6 and 7, Concession 6. One and a half 
fmiles of road re-graded across lots 10, 11, and 12, Concessions 2 and 3. On road 
ibetween lots 4 and 5, Concession 1, % mile of road was gravelled and re-graded 




Clover everywhere in the neighbourhood of Wabigoon and Dryden. 



by contract, 600 yds. of gravel being used. Between lots 4 and 5, across Con- 
cessions 3, 4 and 5, 3 miles of road were gravelled by contract, 1,704 yds. of 
gravel being used. Qn road across lots 11 and 12 between Concessions 2 and 3, 
% mile of road was gravelled by contract, 331 yds. of gravel being used. 

Township of Lash : 

Two culverts built north of Section 26, and 2 tap drains 100 ft. in lengl.li 
built. On road running east and west on the north side of Emo Village, 14 n^''^' 
of road was re-graded. On river lot 38, bridge and trunk road were repaired. 
On road between Sections 24 and 25, i/4 mile' of road was cleared, and twenty rods 
ditched. North of Sections 25, 26, 27 and 28, 2 miles of trunk road were re- 
gravelled. On road between Sections. 32 and 33, a culvert was built and 600 ft. 
tap drain dug, and on trunk road south of Section 32, 700 ft. of ditch were 
deepened. On road between Sections 34 and 35, I/2 mile of road was gravelled. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 211 

Township of Aylsworth : 

On road between river lots 32 and 33, 38 rods re-graded and % mile gravelled. 
On river road across river lots 31, 32 and 37, 48 rods of road gravelled. On river 
road across river lots 30 and 31, 20 rods of road gravelled. 

Township of Barwick : 

One culvert built on trunk road between river lots 8 and 9. A bridge was 
built on road east of river lot 1, span 16 ft. On trunk road, river lot 3o, a 
bridge was repaired. A culvert was built on trunk road on river lot 37. 






Hundreds of acres of red clover and alsike are grown between Wabigoon and 
Eagle River, District of Kenora. 

Township of Nelles: 

On the road between Sections 4 and 5, and between Sections 5 and 8, 1 2/3 
miles of road were gravelled. On road allowance between Sections 4 and 5, 1/2 
mile road grubbed. On road between Sections 16 and 17, 14 mile of road graded. 
On road allowance between Sections 4 and 9, 70 chains ditches, and 10 chains 
of tap ditch dug, and % mile of road cleared. On road between Sections 16 and 
17, and between Sections 8 and 9, 1/3 mile of road gravelled. On road between 
Sections 2 and 3, 10 and 11, 14 and 15, and 22 and 23, 2% miles of road ditched, 
■on one side, Y2 ^lils double ditched, and 314 miles re-graded. One mile of said 
road was grubbed on the sides and 2 culverts built; and on road between Sections 
■22 and 23, 10 chains of washout repaired. On road between Sections 26 and 27, 
and between 34 and 35, 2 miles of road re-graded.. 

Township of Shenston: 

Cleared 14J rods road allowance around rock ridge, north of Section 35, 
■Shenston Township. On road north of- Sections 35 and 36, 280 rods of road 
grubbed, and 257 rods ditched and graded, and 112 rods corduroyed, 30 rods of 



212 REPOET OF THE No. 3 

tap drain dug on Sections 34 and 35. On road between Sections 21 and 28, 32 
rods of ditch dug. On road between Sections 26 and 27, 85 rods of road ditched, 
and 85 rods graded. One culvert built between lots 33 and 28. On road east 
of Sections 3, 10 and 15, 2i/2 miles of road cleared but not burned. 

Township of DilTce: 

Two culverts were built between Sections 32 and 33. North of Sections 35 
and 36, the road was gravelled for a distance of 1% miles. Two culverts repaired 
on trunk road on river lots 32 and 41, and on trunk road across river lots 23 to 26, 
Yo mile of road gravelled. 




A typical view of a siflendid field of red clover near Wabigoon. 

Township of Dohie : 

On road east of lot 1, Concession 6, 1 mile of road re-graded, and brush 
burnt. Four culverts built, east of lot 1, on Concessions 1, 3, 4 and 6. On 
trunk road commencing at the S.E. corner of lot 12, Concession 1, thence easterly, 
3 miles of road gravelled, 1,720 cu. yds. of gravel being used. 

Township of Kingsford: 

Four culverts built west of lot 12, Concession 1, and 2 on Concession 2. 
Four miles of road graded west,..of lot 12, Concessions 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6. On west 
town line across Concessions 3, 4, 5 and 6, 31/0 miles of road brushed. On Con- 
cession 6, 202 rods of .road brushed, and on Concession 4, 163 rods gravelled, 
and on Concession 2, 25 rods gravelled. 

Townships of Potts: 

Two and a half miles of road were grubbed and part brushed between lots 
2 and 3, acfoss Concessions 3, 4 and 5. Twenty-five rods corduroy were laid 
between lots 2 and 3,~ Concession 2, and bridge was built on lot 1. On road 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



213 



between lots 8 and 9, Concessions 1 and 2, 174 rods of road gravelled, 456 rods 
ditched, 109 rods grubbed, 422 rods graded, 2 bridges and 7 culverts built, 195 
rods of corduroy laid and 135 rods tap drain dug. Cut and cleared road allowance 
between lots 8 and 9, Concession 3, south half, and between .Concessions 2 and 3, 
across lots 7 and 8, l^/o miles. 

Township of Carpenter: 

On road between lots 2 and 3, Concession 2, 35 rods corduroy were laid and 
bridge repaired. On road east of lot 1, Concession 3, 1 culvert was built and 
washouts filled in. On road east of lot 7, Concession 5, 200 rods of old road were 
re-graded and brushed, and 400 rods gravelled, and 6 rods ta-p drain dug. Bridge 
was repaired on road across lots 2 and 3, Concession 2. On road between lots 




A viRW in the town of Drvden, District of Kenora, showing the pulp and paper mill. 

6 and 7, 233 rods of road were ditched on Concession 4, and i^ mile gravelled and 
1/4 mile of road grubbed and graded on Concession 6 and 2 culverts built. 

Township of Mather: 

On road between lots 6 and 7, Concessions 5 and 6, 1 mile of road was re- 
graded, and 80 rods grubbed and cleared, on the sides. On road between lots 8 
and 9, Concessions 5 and 6^ 27 rods of road were- ditched, and on Concession 3, 
33 rods. 



Township of Richardson : 

On road between lots 2 and 3, Conceseioft 1, Imile wa» brushed, 20 rods of 
tap drain dug, 60 rods of road graded, 20 rods of road grubbed, and 3 culverts 



314 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



built. On road between Concessions 1 and 2, across lots 11 and 12, 148 rods 
were cleared. On road across lots 8, 9 and 10, between Concessions 1 and 2, lYi 
miles of road were brushed. On road across lots 7 to 12, 21/0 miles of road were 
grubbed. On road across lots 5 to 12, 3 miles of road were graded, and 95 rods 
of tap drain dug. On road across lots 5 and 6, between Concessions 1 and 2„ 2,761 
ft. of corduroy were laid and i/4 of a mile gravelled. A bridge having a span of 
11 ft. was built on lot 5, between Concessions 1 and 2, and 4 culverts were put in. 
Between lots 4 and 5, Concessions 1 and 2, 2 culverts were repaired. 

Long Sault Reserve : 

On trunk road 5 miles were re-graded, 2 miles gravelled, 1,000 yds. of gravel 
being used, and 2 culverts repaired. On road between lots 44 and 45, the clearing, 
burning and grubbing was completed for 1 mile. 




A garden and clover field near Dryden. 

Township of PattuUo: 

On road east of Sections 21, 28 and 33, 3 miles of road were re-graded, 110 
rods of corduroy laid and 1 mile ditched. 



Dohie-Shenston and Mather-Tait Town Line Road: 

One and two-third miles of town line road were re-gravelled where washouts 
had damaged same, and 69 rods ditched, 2 culverts repaired, 3 new culverts built, 
and 25 rods re-graded. Cut 'and cleared road allowance east of Sections 3, 10 
and 15, ly^ miles. ' , 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LAN^DS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



215 



Township of Tait: 

The approaches to bridges between Sections 22 and 23 were filled to a dis- 
tance of 135 yds. On road between Sections 15 and 16, 103 yds. of road were 
graded. On road between Sections 15 and 16, a culvert was built. On road 
south of Section 4, 100 rods of ditch were dug. Two culverts were repaired on 
road between Sections 9 and 16, and 1 culvert between Sections 8 and 17 and 1 
between lots 23 and 26. On road between Sections 9 and 10, 49 rods were graded, 
and between Sections 23 and 26, 23 rods. 

Toivnship of Ativood: 

A culvert was built on trunk road on lot 2, and 400 ft. of trunk road gravelled 
across river lots 20 to 23. Two corrugated iron pipes were put in on the trunk 




A "new beginner"; a settler in the Wabigoon section taking off a crop of clover. 

road at the Atwood and Worth iiigton town line. On trunk road across river 
lots 17 and 18, 14 inile of road was gravelled. On east side of Atwood and 
Worthington town line, commencing at trunk road and from there south, 1,420 ft., 
a ditch was dug to carry surplus water from the ditches to the north of the 
railway. 

Township of Ctirran: 

A culvert was built on road east of river lot 24, and ^/i mile of road gravelled ; 
also, a culvert l)uilt on road east of Section 9. 



216 



EEPORT OF THE 



^0. 3 



Wild Lands Reserve: 

Two new culverts were built on Spohn Trunk road east of Section 21, and 2 
washouts repaired east of Sections 29, 21, 13 and 5, and 4 miles of road gravelled by- 
contract, 4,298 yds. of gravel being used. Three and a half miles of this road 
were brushed and burned on sides. On road north of Section 53, 14 i^ile of 
road was. cleared, and ^ mile grubbed. On road north of Sections 4 and 5, 2 miles 
of road were cleared and grubbed. On road commencing at the S.E. corner of 
Section 44, thence south of Sections 44, 43, 42 and 41, to road allowance on 
the shore of the Eainy River, thence north-westerly along said road allowance to 
the west boundary of Section 41, thence north on road allowance west of Sections 
41, 33, 25 and 17, to the north-west corner of Section 17, 8 miles; this road 
allowance was cleared and grubbed by contract. On road allowance between Sec- 
tions 41 and 42 and between Sections 33 and 41, 2 miles of road were cleared. 




One of the many splendid farms in the Dryden section of the District of Kenora, 
viewed from the Trunk Road. 



Manitou Reserve: 

On trunk road, 3 miles were re-graded, II/2 miles gravelled, 949 yds. of gravel 
being used, and 3 culverts repaired. 

Township of Spohn: 

On road between lots 4 and 5, Concession 5, l^/j miles of road were ditched, 
and across Concessions 3 to 9 inclusive, 7 miles re-graded, and across Concession.= 
4, 5 and 6, 2 miles re-gravelled. On road between Concessions 7 and 8, across 
lots 7 and 8, 1 mile of road was cleared and the centre 12 ft. grubbed. Across 
the centre of lots 11 to 14, Concession 3, for a distance of 214 miles, a clearance 
wias made, 33 ft. wide and a tap drain dug. On road allowance between Con- 
cessions 8 and 9, 2 miles of road were cleared. 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS AND MINES. 



217 



I 



Township of Morley: 

On road north of Section 20 and 21, 2 miles of road were gravelled by 
contract, 1,547 yds. of gravel being used. 

Township of Pratt: ' . 

On road between lots 4 and 5, across Concessions 5 and 6, and north of 
Concession 6, across lots 3 and 4, 3 miles of road were gravelled by contract, 5,741 
cu. yds. of gravel being used. 




The Fort Frances and Rainy River Trunk Road, eusi ol' Uarwick, allowing part 

of a flock of 700 sheep. 



Township of McCrosson : 

On road between lots 2 and 3, across Concessions 1, 2 and 3, 2i/^ miles were 
gravelled. On road between lots 2 and 3, Concession 3, and across lots 1 and 2, 
between Concessions 3 and 4, and east of lot 1 on town line Concessions 4 and 5, 
31/^ miles of road were brushed, logged and grubbed and 7,300 ft. tap drain dug, 9 
culverts built and I/2 ^nile double ditched, and 1,100 ft. single ditched, and 2% 
miles graded. On road between Concessions 2 and 3, across lots 1 and 2, 1 mile of 
road brushed, 14 mile grubbed, double ditclied, 1 mile graded and 3 culverts built. 

Township of Tovell: 

On road between Concessions 2 and 3, across lots 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, 21^ miles 
of road were brushed out and grubbed, and 2 miles partly graded, 1 mile double 
ditched and 1^4 miles single ditched, 4 new culverts built. 



^l.S - REPORT OF THE ISio. 3 

Township of Blue : 

On road between Sections 8 and 17, 170 rods were graded, and a ditch dug 
on each side of road, 2 culverts built and 4 repaired; 60 rods of road repaired 
between iSections 20 and 11. 

Township of Worthington: 

On road between river lots 40 and 41 a bridge was repaired, and between 
Section 34 and lot 16, 6 culverts were repaired, and on the trunk road, on river 
lot 11, a culvert was built. 

The trunk road was kept dragged from Rainy River to Fort Frances, a dis- 
tance of 60 miles. The Rainy River-Spohn road was dragged 15 miles; the 
Sleeman-Bergland road was dragged 18 miles; the Barwick-Black Hawk road 12 
miles and the Emo-Off Lake road 7 miles. 

At Tracey Rapids on the Seine River about 4l^ miles west of Atikokan 
Station, Canadian Northern Railway, a bridge was constructed in March and 
April. The bridge is 145 ft, long, with one rock filled pier 12 x 16, one 18 x 18, 
with a 50 ft. opening; one 16 x 18, with a 27 ft. opening; with an abutment, filled 
with rock, on the south side 7 ft. high, 20 ft. wide and 25 ft. long. Between this 
bridge and the Canadian Northern Railway, a road i/^ mile in length was cut, 
grubbed and graded. 

J. F. Whitson, 

Commissioner. 



To the Honourable ihe Minister of Lands and Forests: — 

SiE, — I beg to submit for your consideration and recommendation that the 
following amounts be expended during the season of 1920 on the construction 
of new roads and bridges, the maintenance of previously constructed trunk roads, 
the re-grading and re-surfacing with stone or gravel of old roads, the drainage 
of swamps, and the construction of tap drains in the Districts of Rainy River, 
Kenora, Port Arthur, Fort William, Algoma, Sudbury, Nipissing, Parry Sound, 
Muskoka, Manitoulin Island, and County of Renfrew. 

District of Bainy River: 

In this District there are approximately 150 miles of trunk roads 
constructed or re-constructed during the last seven years which require 
to be maintained. In places they require constant dragging, ditches and 
culverts require to be kept open, and occasionally parts of the road require 
re-gravelling. In several of the townships from 10 to 20 miles north of 
the C. N. Railway, settlement has taken place during the last five or six 
years and many of these settlers have little or no access to a market, 
except by winter roads, and in consequence the settlers have been badly 
handicapped, therefore, it is necessary that new roads be constructed 
through these townships, connecting them with the trunk roads already 
built. In some instances trunk roads have been constructed north lead- 
ing into these townships, which will require to be extended and the worst 
parts of the roads surfaced with gravel. For this purpose I would recom- 
mend the expenditure of $70,000 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LAXDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 219 

District of Kenora: 

For repairing and maintaining old roads north and west of the 
Towns of Kenora and Keewatin, for the gravelling of the trunk road 
already constructed between Oxdrift and Eagle Eiver Station along the 
C. P. Eailway, for the construction of new roads in the townships adja- 
cent to Quibell Station on the G. T. Eailway, for the gravelling of sections 
on the trunk road between Vermilion Bay on the C. P. Eailway and Quibell 
Station on the'G. T. Eailway, for repairing the road between Dryden 
Station on the C. P. Eailway and Eichan Station on the G. T. Eailway; 
also to defray the expense of survey and exploration of new roads in the 
districts north and west of Kenora 75,000 

Districts of Port Arthur and Fort William : 

For the maintenance of 175 miles of trunk roads in the district north, 
east, west and south of the Towns of Port Arthur and Fort William, ex- 
tending southerly to Pigeon Eiver, westerly to the Kaministiquia Eiver, 
and northerly and westerly through the settled portions of the district; 
to continue the trunk road commenced last season between Port Arthur 
and Loon Lake along the railway and east towards Nipigon 75,000 

Sudbury and Algoma Districts: 

The maintenance of trunk roads in the vicinity of Sudbury and 
throughout the mining district surrounding Sudbury, including the West 
Shining Tree Gold District; for the extension of a new road between 
Capreol Station on the C. N. Eailway north of Sudbury to Sellwood 
Junction on the same railway, for the maintenance of the trunk road 
between Sudbury and North Bay, to complete the trunk road from 
Eutter Station on the Toronto Branch of the C. P. Eailway east about 
20 miles to the village of Noelville and east to Lake Nipissing, which 
was partly constructed last season. For the gravelling in places of the 
trunk road constructed in 1919 between Warren Station on the C. P. 
Eailway, south to the Village of St. Charles 80,000 

Nipusing District : 

For the reconstruction and repairing of a new road between Verner 
on the C. P. Eailway, southerly to connect with the trunk road at Noel- 
ville ; for repairing the road from Sturgeon Falls on C. P. Eailway, north 
to Field; for the completion of a road north of North Bay in the Town- 
ship of Widdifield; for gravelling in places and maintenance of trunk 
road between North Bay and Mattawa, also the extension of the trunk 
road east from Powassan Station on G. T. Eailway, through the Town- 
ship of Chisholm " ^5,000 

Parry Sound and MusTcoka Districts: 

For the completion of the North Bay and Bracebridge trunk road 
through the Districts of Parry Sound and Muskoka from Novar Station 
on the G. T. Eailway, to a point south of Severn Bridge ; to continue the 
construction of a trunk road commenced last season, running west from 



220 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Trout Creek Station on the G. T. Railway through the Village of Com- 
manda to Loring; to continue the construction of a trunk road from 
Nipissing village west to Restoule; to reconstruct and gravel, in places, 
the road between Gordon and Foots Bay on the road from the Village 
of Parry Sound to Bala; to construct and repair in places the trunk 
Toad between Callandei; and Huntsville 132,000 

County of Benfrew. , 

To continue the extension of the Pembroke and Mattawa trunk 
road from Klock on the C. P. Eailway east to near Chalk Eiver 25,000 

Algoma District, Vicinity of Sault Ste. Marie : 

To complete the gap between Algoma Mills and Cutler Station on the 
C. P. Eailway; for maintenance and repairs of trunk road between Sault 
Ste. ^larie and Sudbury ; for the maintenance of trunk roads on St. 
Joseph Island and Campement D'Ours Island; for the completion of 
Goulais Bay Eoad and for the construction of two small bridges near 
Desbarats and Thessalon on the Sault Ste. Marie trunk road 83,000 

Manitoulin Island: 

For the completion of the trunk roads commenced three years ago 
between Little Current and Gore Bay and between Little Current and 
Manitowaning ; also the extension of the trunk roads south and west of 
Gore Bay . 25,000 

Unforeseen ^Yorlc : 

The construction of short roads in the new settlement; building 
and repairing small bridges ; the construction of culverts, etc 30,000 

Engineering, office expenses, surveys, exploration, machinery and 
equipment 30,000 

$700,000 

J. F. Whitson, 

Commissioner. 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OP LAN^DS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 221 



NEW LISKEAED FAEM. 

The successful operation of the Farm has been very much hindered on recount 
of lack of farm buildings. It is more imperative that the New Liskeard Demon- 
stration Farm should have suitable buildings and farm stock if it is to fulfill the 
purpose for which it was established; viz., to demonstrate the most successful lines 
of farm work in Temiskaming District in particular, and the north country as 
*a whole. To do this, live stock is absolutely essential, particularly in a country 
primarily adapted to live stock farming, I cannot too strongly recommend that 
steps be taken at once to prepare for the erection of buildings next summer. 
Operations should be commenced early in the spring in order that the l)uildings be 
ready for the first crop harvested. 

One of the most important lines of work carried on during the past season 
has been in the clearing of additional land. In the early fall of 1918 a contract 
was let for clearing thirty acres. On account of the wet weather it could not be 
completed. During the past summer weather conditions were most favourable 
for land clearing and there were about seventy acres made ready for the plow ; 
sixty on the " West " place and ten on the property in town. This was all fall 
plowed except ten acres on the " West " property. There are from geventy-five to 
eighty acres ready for crop next year. 

Field Crops. 

On May 31st, eight acres were seeded to O.A.C. No. 72 oats at the rate of 
three bushels per acre. The field had been in pasture for some years rnd was 
spring plowed. At first it was intended that the grain from this field should be 
"used for ensilage. However, as no buildings were erected, it was aHowed to ripen 
and was cut on September 3rd. The quality of grain was very good and the yield 
sixty bushels per acre. Harvest condition's prevented stacking operations and the 
grain was quite badly coloured. On the whole, we consider the crop a good average^ 
especially for this year. 

On June 5th, seven acres were seeded with O.A.C. No. 3, three bushels per 
acre. They were cut on the 15th day of August and gave a yield of fifty-five 
bushels per acre. The quality of these oats is better than that of the No. 73. 
They were cut two weeks earlier and were put in stack before the wet weather 
came on. The No. 3 has proven to be a splendid oat for this section. 

There was a small field of new land seeded late in June. This grain did not 
mature and was cut and made into hay. 

A small area of potatoes was planted on June 10th. The Irish Cobbler and 
Green Mountain were the varieties used. Eesults were fairly satisfactory but 
hardly up to the standard. The entire crop was shipped to Kapuskasing. 

There was also a small acreage of turnips planted. These did much better 
than was expected owing to the fact that weather conditions after planting were 
most favourable for roots. After rain came the turnips picked up and developed 
into one of the best crops on the Farm. They were sold to a farmer for feed 
on account of lack of storage and also because we had no stock to which to feed 
them. 

The seven acres of No. 3 oats were seeded down to hay and the catch was 
extra good. The nine acres where the No. 72 were grown were fall plowed for 
crop next year. 



222 REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

No other kinds of grain were grown for the reason that all hay and grain 
had to be stacked. Therefore we did not consider it would be good l3usiness to 
try out small areas of wheat, barley and other grains. 

The hay crop was a really good average, yielding from one and a half to two 
tons per acre. It was a first crop and mostly clover. 

The second growth or aftermath, was extra heavy. It matured so well that 
we decided to try an experiment in cutting some of it for seed. Cutting was done 
on November 15th. Weather conditions were very favourable at that time and we » 
expected to get it all stacked in good shape. However, rain came on the night 
before we were ready to stack, consequently we had to leave it in coil for weeks 
before it was' threshed. There was quite a percentage of seed frosted but sufficient 
good seed to pay all expenses in connection with the experiment. 

Shoet Course in Agriculture and Seed Fair. 

The Second Annual Short Course and Seed Fair was held for five days, March 
10th to 15th. 

The instructors were: W. J. Bell, B.S.A., Kemptville; Frank Marcellus, 
B.S.A. ,Guelph; F. C. Hart, B.S.A., Markets Branch, Toronto; A. H. McLennan, 
Vegetable Specialist, T-oronto; W, B. Angle, New Liskeard; L, H, Hanlan, J. M. 
Macintosh, A. MacLachlan, and the writer, of New Liskeard and Monteith. 

The Course was arranged and conducted in a practical manner throughout. 
The farmers of the district took a very keen interest in the Course, also in the 
Fair. There was a large attendance at all lectures, especially those held in the 
afternoon. It seemed to be difficult for the farmers to attend both morning and 
afternoon lectures. 

The entries in the different grain, seed and root classes were not as numerous . 
as in 1918, This is explained by the fact that the harvest season of 1918 was 
less favourable than that of 1917. 

Entries, 

Oats 16 

Wheat 23 

Barley 10 

Peas 12 

Grasses 4 

Flax 3 

Potatoes 14 

Total 82 

Donations. 

Hogg & Lytle $25 00 

Massey-Harrls Co., J. T. Goldthorpe, Agent 25 00 

International Harvester Co., O'Grady Bros., Agents 25 00 

W. M. Gray-Sons, Campbell, Ltd., O'Grady Bros., Agents 10 00 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co., O'Grady Bros., Agents 5 00 

Chas. A. Julien, O'Grady Bros., Agents 15 00 

Imperial Bank, silver cup. 
Union Bank, silver cup. 

J. Fleury & Sons, O'Grady Bros., Agents 17 00 

Cockshutt Plow Co., Edwards Agency 15 00 

Agricultural Society, New Liskeard 50 00 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS,FOEESTS AND MINES. 223 



Prize Winners. 
Class 1, O.A.C. No. 3 Oats— 

1st. Chas. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd. Jno. Molitor, Earlton, Ont. 

3rd. G. J. Bray, R. R. No. 1, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 2, O.A.C. No. 12 Oats— 

1st. D. D. Taylor, Hanbury, Ont. 
2nd. Bruce Kerr, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 3, Abundance — 

1st. W. R. Peters, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd. G. L. Broughton, Uno Park, Ont. 

Section If, Any Variety (White) — 

1st. Geo. Stephenson, Box 412, Englehart, Ont. 
2nd. A. A. Wilson, New Liskeard, Ont. 
3rd. Mr. Mall, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Class 2, Wheat, Marquis Spring — 

1st. Gee. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd. Cyril Beatty, Earlton, Ont. 

3rd. Mr. Mall, New Liskeard, Ont. 

4th. Jno. Sharp, R. R. No. 2, New Liskeard, Ont. 

5th. J. M. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section /?. Fall Wheat — 

1st. A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

Class 3, Barley (Any Six-rowed Variety) — 
1st. Geo. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd. Mr. Foley, R. R. No. 1, New Liskeard, Ont. 
3rd. G. Stein, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Class J/, Peas, Large Field Pea — 

1st. W. R. Peters, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd. P. Gouvremont, New Liskeard, Ont. 

3rd. A Lusk, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 2. Small Field Pea — 

1st. A. Dojipe, Hanbury, Ont. 
2nd. G. Stein, New Liskeard, Ont. 
3rd. Allen Merchant, Uno Park, Ont. 

Class 5, Grasses, Red Clover Seed — 

Section 2, Alsike Seed — 

Ist. B. Keetch, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 3, Timothy Seed — 

1st. A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 
2nd. T. H. Nickle, Hanbury. Ont. 
3rd. W. R. Peters, Uno Park, Ont. 

Class 6, Flax — 

1st. Geo. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd. A Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

3rd. J. iM. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Class 7, Potatoes. Irish Cobbler — 

Ist. W. R. Peters, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd. G. J. Bray, R. R. No. 1, New Liskeard, Ont. 

3rd. Chas. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

4th. E. David, New Liskeard, Ont. 

5th. G. A. Bassett, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 2, Oreen Mountain — 

Ist. Geo. Stephenson, Box 412, Englehart, Ont. 
2|i'd. J. M. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 
3rd. E. Healey, Hanbury, Ont. 



224 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 



Sweepstakes — 

Oats — Banner, Geo. Stephenson, Box 412, Englehart, Ont. 

Wheat — ^^Marquis, G. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 

Peas — ^Small Field Pea, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. • 

Grasses — Timothy, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

Potatoes — Irish Cobbler, W. R. Peters, Uno Park, Ont. 

The Seed Fair was carried on under the same arrangement and organization 
as the previous year. We are planning to hold our Third Annual Fair next year 
and hope for more entries than we had this year. 

In conclusion, I beg to state that practically all work in connection with the 
Farm was done under the supervision of Mr. J, M. Macintosh, now Agricultural 
Eepresentative at Sault Ste. Marie. I succeeded Mr. Macintosh here on September 
1st, this year. 

There is no doubt in my mind that a properly conducted Farm in this locality 
(New Liskeard) can be made to fill an important place in the Agricultural 
Development of Temiskaming District. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) W. G. Nixon, 

Superintendent. 



MATHESON FARM. 

There are one hundred and sixty acres in the Farm and approximately sixty 
cleared. The balance has been burned over and is covered with logs and stumps 
that can be very easily cleared. 

Thus far, the Fariu has been used in growing hay, grain and potatoes. The 
grain has been sold to settlers at moderate prices for seed purposes, when it was 
suitable for that. 

This year a small post barn was erected in which to store hay and grain and 
where threshing and pressing can be done. The barn offers a very good demon- 
stration to settlers, in that it is cheap and yet efficient. There is very little framing 
to it so that any handy man can build one like it. The frame is all made up of 
posts, braced with post girts and plank braces. It is sheeted with rough lumber 
and has a galvanized iron roof. 

This year the Farm was cropped as follows : 

Fall Wheat — • 

Dawson's Golden Chaff 5 acres. 

Spring Wheat — 

Marquis Variety 1 acre. 

Oats — 

O.A.C. No. 72 2 bushels. 

O.A.C. No. 3 Balance of farm. 

The main crop (as stated) consisted of No. 3 oats. They were seeded on 
May 16th and harvested on August 11th, eighty-seven days from date of seeding. 

The O.A.C. No. 72 oats were seeded on May 29th and harvested one hundred 
and two days later, on September 8th. 

The fall and spring wheat did not give very good results. Twenty bushels 
of spring wheat were threshed from one acre. While this may be considered a 



1919-20 DEPAETMENT OF LAXDS, FOEESTS AND MINES. 



225 



fair yield it is hardly up to the standard. On account of severe winter killing 
the fall wheat did not give a very heavy yield twenty-five bags were threshed from 
five acres. 

The No. 3 oats are of very good quality, there are 1,098 bushels as they came 
from the mill. 



(Sgd.) W. G. Nixon, 

Farm Director. 



226 REPOET OF THE No. 3 



Statement of Expenditure under Northern and North-Western Ontario Development 
Acts, 1912, 1915, and Amendments. 

(For the Year Ended 31st October, 1919.) 

District. Expenditure. 

1. District of Nipissing, Parry Sound and Muskoka. North Bay to Cal- 

lander; Callander to Washago on G. T. Ry.; Mattawa to Pem- 
broke; Mattawa to Markstay on Canadian Pacific Railway $199,824 47 

2. District of Temiskaming. Haileybury to Cochrane; Cochrane to 

Kapuskasing; Porcupine and Elk Lake 507,260 56 

3. District of Sudbury. Vicinity of the town of Sudbury and Mining 

District surrounding, including the West Shining Tree District; 
Sudbury-North Bay Trunk Road ; and portion of Sault Ste. Marie- 
Sudbury Trunk Road 191,499 24 

4. District of Algoma (North), Vicinity of Hearst, along Transconti- 

nental arid Algoma Central Railways 20,089 29 

5. District of Algoma (South). On Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie Trunk 

Road; Sault Ste. Marie to Algoma Mills, and Goulais Bay Road . . 134,705 33 

6. District of Thunder Bay. Tributary to Port Arthur and Fort William 107,877 55 

7. District of Kenora. Vicinity of Kenora and Keewatin and between 

Wabigoon and Dryden and Oxdrift on Canadian Pacific Railway. . 52,092 48 

8. District of Rainy River. In Rainy River Valley 137,102 26 

9. Algonquin Provincial Park 102 38 

10. St. Joseph Island 22,248 67 

11. General Administration Expenses 18,457 81 

12. Experimental Farms 12,992 49 

13. Creamery, New Llskeard 7,733 07 

14. Grain Elevators 182 25 

15. Seed Grain 7,322 04 

16. Cattle Purchase Account 18,720 61 

17. Soldiers' Settlement Account 366,085 13 

18. Settlers' Loan Account 44,456 01 



$1,848,751 M 

Statement of Expenditure, Year Ending 31st October, 1919. 

Making of Roads: 

Grigg, A., Deputy Minister, salary $400 00 

Whitson, J. F., Commissioner, salary 4,500 00 

Bruce, A. E. D., Secretary and Accountant, 

salary 3,073 25 

Beardall, F. G., Clerk, salary 1,625 06 

Lawer, W. L., Bookkeeper, salary 1,536 62 

Dower, A. R., Clerk, salary 1,164 20 

Reid, A., Draughtsman, salary 842 54 

Laidlaw, Miss B., Stenographer, salary (3 

months) 291 82 



Wages $797,674 86 

Contracts 125,214 87 

Supplies and equipment 454,936 82 



$13,433 49 



1,377,826 55 
$1,391,260 04 



Advancement of Settlement and Colonization: * 

Wages 8,042 26 

Contracts '. 913 75 

Supplies, stock and equipment 4,036 48 



Creamery, New Liskeard: 

Wages $3,223 14 

Supplies, equipment, freight and expenses .... 4,509 93 



12,992 49 



7,733 07 



1919-20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FOEESTS AXD MINES. 227 

Grain Elevators, New Liskeard District: 

Preparing statistics and disbursments $182 25 

Seed Grain: 

Wages $93 45 

Seed, freight and expenses 7,228 59 

7,322 04 



Cattle Purchase Account: 

Cost of cattle, feed, freight and expenses 18,720 61 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act: 

Wages $155,413 91 

Contracts 26,608 03 

Material, equipment, supplies, stock, railway 

siding and expenses 184,063 19 



366,085 13 



Settlers' Loan Department: 

Dane, P., Commissioner, salary $5,000 00 

Kennedy, W. K. P., Accountant, salary 2,500 00 

Crawford, G., Stenographer, salary . , 777 50 



$1,804,295 63 



Net amount of loans issued $35,470 00 

Expenses 708 51 



8,277 50 
36,178 51 



44,456 01 

$1,848,751 64 

Arthur E. D. Bruce, 

Secretary and Accountant. 



Special Warrant Accounts. 

Administered by the Northern Development Branch. 

Expenditure to 31st October, 1919. 

lOrder-in-Council dated 30th September, 1916 — 

Expenses Log Houses at Toronto and Ottawa Exhibitions and at Stock 

Judging Pavilion, New Liskeard 

)rder-in-Council dated 20th February, 1917— 

Expenditure 

sOrder-in-Council dated 18th May, 1917— 

Freight •" • 

Order-in-Council dated 18th May, 1917 — 

Returned Soldiers' Recreation Account — Expenditure, 1919 



$1,591 27 


17 


15 


3 


04 


224 


29 


$1,835 75 



Arthur E. D. Bruce, 

Secretary and Accountant. 



^^8 REPOET OF LANDS, FORESTS AXD MIXES. Xo. 3 

Revenue Account, 1919. 
The Making of Roads: 

Refunds on the sale of supplies, etc $553 65 

Advancement of Settlement and Colonization: 

Sale of hay, produce, equipment, etc., and rent 395 50 

Creamery at Neic Liskeard: 

Butter revenue, sale of buttermilk, cans, etc 6.922 41 

Seed Grain: 

Notes retired 13,107 78 

Purchase of Cattle Account: 

Proceeds of cattle sold 2,880 00 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act: 

Sale of provisions, etc 78,668 26 

Special Warrant Accounts: 

Sales and refunds 719 95 

$103,247 55 

Settlers' Loan Account: 

Payments on principal, interest and refunds 61,772 82 

Total revenue under all heads, 1919 account $165,020 37 



RECORD OF CORRESPONDENCE. 

For year ended Slst October, 1919. 

Letters received 8,367 

Letters mailed 6,715 

Circulars mailed 1,509 

— 8,224 

Abthub E. D. Bruce, 

Secretary and Accountant. 



i 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and 
Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1920 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 

Printed and Published by CLARKSON W. JAMES, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 1 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and 
Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



For the Year Ending 31st October 



1920 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by CLARKSON W. JAMES, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 1 




Minister of Lands and Forests and his farm, Manitoulin Island. 



Printed by 
THE RYERSON PRESS'. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Minister's Preface 5 

Appendices: 

No. 1. Department Inside Officers and Clerks 18 

2. " Outside Agents and Inspectors 21 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased with Collections . . . ; 23 

4. " Gross Revenue 24 

5. " Receipts (Special Funds) 25 

6. " Gross Disbursements ••• 26 

7. " Timber Cut and Amounts Accruing re Dues, etc 32 

8. " Patents, etc., Issued 34 

9. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 35 

10. Successful Candidates at Cullers' Examination 36 

11. Statement of Work in Military Office (Lands Branch) 36 

12. " Letters, Reports, Documents Received and Dispatched .. 37 

13. " Locations, etc., under Free Grants Sec. P. L. Act 38 

14. " Lands Sold 45 

15. Report of Director of Surveys on Crown Surveys 51 

15a. Statement of Municipal Surveys Confirmed 54 

16. " Municipal Surveys Ordered 55 

17. " Crown Surveys in Progress 56 

18. " Crown Surveys Completed 58 

19. Surveyor's Report. Parts of Townships Devon and Hartington, District 

of Thunder Bay 60 

20. " Base and Meridian Lines, District of Thunder Bay . . 62 

21. " Township Outlines, District of Algoma 65 

22. " Meridian and Base Line, District of Kenora, Thunder 

Bay and Patricia 68 

23 " Meridian Line in the Vicinity of Ground Hog River, 

Districts of Sudbury and Timiskaming 74 

24. " Part of Township of Nansen, District of Timiskaming 75 

25. " Part of Boundary Line Between the Districts of Rainy 

River and Kenora 77 

26. " Traverse of Missinaibi Lake and River and Tributary 

Waters, Districts of Algoma and Sudbury 80 

27. " Township Outlines, District of Algoma 82 

28. " Re-establishing Part of Boundary of Algonquin Park 85 

29. " Certain Township Outlines on the Kapuskasing River. 

District of Algoma 85 

30. " Sub-division, Township of Fowler, District of Thunder 

Bay 88 

31. " Meridian Line and Traverse of Part of Dog Lake, 

North of Fowler Township, District of Thunder 

Bay 93 

32. " Traverse of Long Lake, District of Thunder Bay .... 94 

33. " Sub-division, Residue Hanlan Township, District of 

Algoma 96 

34. " Sub-division, Residue Casgrain Township, District of 

Algoma 98 

[3] 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

3i5. Surveyor's Report, Outlines of Townships, MacVicar, Carmichael, Stringer, 
Ford, Hicks, Oke, Poulett and Aitken, District of 
Timiskaming 99 

36. " Certain Township Outlines, District of Thunder Bay. . 102 

37. " Kashaweogama and Island Lakes, Districts of Thunder 

Bay and Kenora 104 

38. " Certain Township Outlines North of C.P.R., District of 

Sudbury 107 

39. " North Seventy-eight Miles of West Boundary, Nipigon 

Forest Reserve and Production Northward 108 

40. " Aerial Survey, James Bay Vicinity 110 

41. Quetico Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 115 

42. Algonquin Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 116 

43. Colonization Roads, Superintendent's Report 120 

44. Highways and Bridges under Northern Development Branch 144 

45. Northern Development Branch — Statement 175 

46. Report of Kapuskasing Board of Adjustment 182 

47. Settlers' Loans, Commissioner's Report 204 

48. Forestry Branch Report 207 

49. Rondeau Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 236 



Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests 
of the Province of Ontario 

For the Year Ending 31st October, 1920 



To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 
May it Please Youk Honoue : 

For the information of Your Honour and the Legislative Assembly, I have the 
honour to submit a report for the fiscal year ending the 31st of October, 1920, 
covering the Department of Lands and Forests. 

Prior to the year 1906 the management and control of the natural resources 
of the Province as applicable to Lands, Forests and Mines, rested in the " Depart- 
ment of Crown Lands " but in that year by Legislative Amendment the " Depart- 
ment of Lands, Forests and Mines " was substituted therefor. This designation 
obtained up to the 1920 Session of the Legislative Assembly, when under an Act, 
known as " The Department of Mines Act," assented to June 4th, 1920, a separate 
Department of Mines was established, the hitherto parent Department thus becom- 
ing " The Department of Lands and Forests." Consequently, the data furnished 
herein is excluded to the Lands and Forests, while that bearing on the Mining 
Industry may be found in the Report of the Department of Mines. 

Colonization and Immigration. 

The Colonization and Immigration Branch of the Province, which had been 
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Lands, Forests and Mines since the 
6th of January, 1916, was by Order-in-Council dated the 12th March, 1920, trans- 
ferred to the Department of Agriculture, to which it had formerly been attached 
-0 that statistics bearing upon this service may be obtained from the reports of the 
Minister of Agriculture. 

Clergy Lands. 

Clergy Lands to the extent of 82 acres were sold for $57.40 and the collection 
on account of same and former sales of such lands was $862.21. (See Appendix 
No. 3, page 23.) 

Common School Lands. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 146.25 acres for $200.77, 
while the collection on account of those and former sales was $5,527.74. (See 
Appendix No. 3, page 23.) 

Grammar School Lands. 

An area of 151 acres was sold for $231.00. The collection on account of 
former sales was $756.16. (See Appendix No. 3, page 23.) 

[5] 



REPOl^T OF THE ' Xo. 3 



University Lands, 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 720.87 acres for $360.44. 
The amount collected on account of these and former sales was $1,806.18. (See 
Appendix jSTo. 3, page 23.) 

Ceown Lands. 

There was sold during the year for agricultural and town site purposes 
72,591.08 acres for $69,956.87. The collection on account of these and former 
sales was $81,480.12. 

Crown Lands to the extent of 10,688.81 acres were leased for $2,155.06. 
Collections on these and former leases amounted to $59,583.18. 

The total area of Crown Lands disposed of by sale and lease throughout the 
year was 84,379.81 acres for the sum of $72,961.54. The total collections on 
account of sales, leases, etc., were $150y015.59. (See Appendix No. 3, page 23.) 




Bush lot in 1917, 120 acres cleared in 1920. Farm of R. R. Long and Son, in Bowman 

Township. 

Settlers in Sale Townships. 

The tendency towards purchasing lands in Northern Ontario for pioneer 
settlement slightly improved over the previous year. Temiskaming District with 
its agencies at New Liskeard, Englehart, Matheson, and Cochrane, all falling 
within the great clay belt, is more largely in the eye of prospective land settlers 
than any other particular section, presumably because it offers, by means of the 
Provincial Government Railway and the Transcontinental Line, a ready means of 
acquiring the best of clay loam soil and a reasonable supply of pulpwood. There 
a settler is able to secure regular employment in the bush or lumber camps during 
the winter months to earn sufficient means to assist him in clearing and improving 
his homestead and, with the advantages accruing from his rights under a fairly 
generous land regulation whereby, subject to certain conditions, he may cut and 
sell his pulpwood, the settler, if possessed of ambition and energy, should make 
good. 

Numerous inquiries are received from time to time relative to the securing 
of land in all parts of the Province and with a view to facilitating the granting 



1920-21 DEPABTMENT OF LAN^DS AND FOEESTS. 



of applications inspections are made of sold lots to check up the improvements 
of holders of unpatented claims. When delinquents are found cancellation is 
effected and though over 400 individuals acquired by purchase farm lots in surveyed 
areas the Crown cancelled 208 sales for failure of the purchasers to meet the pre- 
scribed conditions of settlement. 

Permission was granted to 375 settlers to assign their interests for divers 
reasons, the assignee in each case being required to pay the purchase price in full, 
rather than by instalments. 

Settlers to the number of 425 satisfied -the requirements and obtained their 
patents in sale townships. 

Special provision is made in the case of soldiers who held unpatented land 
and served in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces overseas, whereby arrears oi 
payments due the Crown are remitted and patents issued on completion of settle- 
ment duties. A free grant of 160 acres may be made to a returned soldier condi- 
tional that he perform the homestead duties. A considerable number have availed 
themselves of these privileges. 

Several of the isolated remaining Clergy, Grammar and Common School Land 
Sales were paid in full and the rightful claimants secured patents. (For tabulated 
statement see Appendix Xo. 8, page 34.) 

Free Geants. 

Since the Great War there has been a gradual growth of actual settlers taking 
free homesteads and the number has again increased over last year, there being 
654 during the year. The price of farm products has been fairly steady and the 
cro})s quite bountiful and these factors while tending towards settlement in the 
older portions of the Province apparently influence those land seekers who are 
desirous of obtaining free farms for homesteading. The average individual farm 
location increased from 125 acres of a 3^ear ago to 166 acres this year when the 
total area thus located comprised 88,813 acres. Patents for Free Grant lands 
issued to 458 persons covering an area of 53,395 acres, while over 7,500 acres were 
purchased in small parcels within Free Grant territory for fuel, pasture, pleasure 
and summer resort purposes. 

A number of settlers have come from Michigan and Minnesota States and some 
are returning to Rainy River and Thunder Bay Districts from the dry belts of 
Saskatchewan and Alberta, and in addition to the new locations, where after in- 
spection by a Crown official it is found the Jocatee is not making good, is a specu- , 
lator or a spurious holder, his location is cancelled and the land resumed. In this 
way over 70,000 acres reverted to the Crown during the past year. 

The Free Grant areas of the province are widely scattered, both Old and New 
Ontario having their respective territories. Certain sections south of the French 
River and Georgian Bay, opened many years ago, have been very largely alienated 
in respect of the choice arable land as it goes in the rocky formations. Isolated 
lots arise regularly where at least fifty per cent, of the land is fit for farming, 
the minimum percentage pre.<«ented by the regulations, but in most instances these 
are sections comprised in timber berths, and frequently serious objections are 
registered by the timber licensees against disposing of the land. Where, however, 
the Crown is convinced that the applicant has bona-fide intentions of becoming a 
-farmer in the general accept-ation of the term every reasonable opportunity is 
afforded him. irrespective of the timber licensees' protestations, which nevertheless 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



are always investigated. Eetardation of real settlement is not encouraged by sus- 
taining every objection of timber dealers. Neither is the holding of land ostensibly 
for settlement though in reality for timber manipulation, condoned. 

MiLITAKY GkANTS. 

The Act 1, Edward YII, Cap. 6, which governs these grants, came into force 
on the 15th of April, 1901. 

This Act is applicable to all persons who had served in the Canadian Militia 
and were called out for active service in the Province of Ontario and to persons 




River scene, Northern Ontario. 



who enlisted in ' Ontario for service and went to South Africa during the " Boer 
War " with the regular military forces of this Province. 

A person claiming land under this Act was required to furnish evidence satis- 
factory to the ^linister of Ivands that he was a member of one of these classes, and 
all claims were required to be filed with the Minister of Lands before the 30th day 
of September, A.D., 1908. 

On receipt of this evidence a certificate was issued to the veteran, giving him 
authority to select 160 acres of land in certain, townships, designated for this pur- 
pose by Order-in-Council. 

This certificate was also accepted by the Department of Lands for the sum 
of $80 in payment for lands purchased from, the said Department, or could be 
surrendered to the Government and an allowance of $50 in cash given therefor. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 9 

Au ameudment to the Veterans' Land Grant Act was passed by the Legisla- 
ture of the Province of Ontario in the Session of 1920, to come into force and take 
effect on the 1st of June, 1920, providing " That lands located and granted under 
this Act, have passed out of the ownership of such persons and are being held out 
of production, and an inspection of these lands shows that the owner lives outside 
of the District in which the lands are situate, notice may be sent to the owner 
that such owner must within one year from the date of notice become a bona-fide 
user or occupant of said lands and comply with the regulations made under this 
Act and that in default of his so doing all his right, title and interest in the said 
lands shall revert to the Crown, but the owner of such lands shall be entitled to 
be paid by the Treasurer of Ontario an amount equal to the purchase money 
received by the Province on the sale of the lands under this Act." But few appli- 
cations and inquiries in pursuance of this amendment were filed during the past 
year. 

Under the Act 1, Edward VII, Cap. 6, and amendments thereto, there have 
been issued 13,998 certificates and although the time for receiving applications for 
these grants expired on the 30th of September, 1908, there are still letters being 
received from men or their next of kin, who were entitled to this grant, who claim 
that they have only now become aware of the fact. These applications, therefore, 
could not now be accepted and no forms of applications have been sent out. 

During the past year there have been located 35 of these certificates covering 
5,640 acres in the townships open for veterans, making in all a total of 8,364 
certificates thus located. 

In seven cases the certificates have been surrendered and applied in payment 
of lands purchased from the Crown, covering in all 703 acres, making a total of 
798 that have thus been applied. 

There was one certificate surrendered to the Crown for the $50 commutation 
money, making a total of 3,264 certificates surrendered in this manner. 

During the year there have been issued 69 patents for lands located by 
veterans, and in all 7,440 have thus been disposed of. 

The total number of certificates that have, therefore, been disposed of is 
12,426, leaving 1,572 that are still outstanding. " 

During the year 13 veteran locations, covering 2,118 acres, were cancelled for 
the non-performance of the settlement duties to which they became subject on 
account of being assigned before patent was issued. 

Under the Act 1, Edward VII, Cap. 6, and amendments thereto covering these 
grants it is necessary for all locatees of the lands located to apply for their patents 
before ten years have expired from the date of location. If this application for 
patent is not made within ten years, then the land comes imder the settlement 
regulations, and unless the settlement duties are proceeded with the locations are 
liable to cancellation. Previous to the expiration of the ten years after location, 
the Department sends a notice to each veteran directing him to the provision 
respecting patent and in this manner has saved many of the locatees from losing 
their lands by forfeiture. (See Appendix No. 11.) 

Collections. 

The total revenue of the Department from all sources was $2,911,047.13. Of 
this, $81,480.12 came from Agricultural Lands and Townsites: $59,583.18 Crown 
Leases. From Woods and Forests the revenue was $2,656,630.51 made up of the 

2 L,F. 



10 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

following items, Bonus, $1,143,735.1§; Timber Dues, $1,171,692.14; Ground Eent, 
$10-5,398.88; Transfer Fees, $7,640.00; Fire Protection Charge, $228,174.31. 
From Provincial Parks, $70,900.84. (See Appendix No. 4, page 24. 

Disbursements. 

The total expenditure of the Department for ordinary service was $1,624,- 
805.51. Some of the principal items were: Crown Land Agents' Salaries and 
Disbursements, $20,120,72; Homestead Inspectors, $21,725.39; Crown Timber 
Agents, $33,709.64; Ottawa Agency, $3,466.03; Fire Eanging, $504,518.42; Forest 
Eanging and Measurement of Timber, $207,675.13; Forest Eeserves, $4,456.38; 
Eeforestation, $47,454.72; Algonquin Provincial Park, $34,739.55; Quetico Pro- 
vincial Park, $10,260.90; Eondeau Provincial Park, $9,736.57; Purchase and 
Maintenance of Automobiles, $2,084.49; Surveys, $150,700.97; Colonization Eoads, 
$451,808.59; Grant, Canadian Forestry Association, $1,000.00; Commissions re 
Sundry Investigations, $50,000.00; Contingencies, Lands and Forests, $36,667.32; 
Travelling Expenses, Lands and Forests, $2,721.42; Contingencies, Forestry 
Branch, $2,093.49; Contingencies, Colonization Eoads Branch, $3,223.02; Travel- 
ling Expenses, Colonization Eoads, $936.56. 

Woods and Forests. 

The accrued revenue from Woods and Forests for the year ending October 
31st, 1920, amounted to $3,120,808.41, an increase of $842,249.75 over the pre- 
ceding year. 

The revenue collected also shows a substantial increase over previous year's 
collections, being $2,656,630.51 as against $1,805,081.36, an increase of 
$853,549.15. 

In season 1919-20 the returns show a slight falling off in quantity of pulpwood 
and cordwood taken out. In all other classes of timber the production shows a 
gratifying increase. 

The quantity of sawlog, boom and square pine timber cut during past season 
totalled 312,924,391 feet B.M., an increase of 121,000,000 feet B.M. The pro- 
duction of other timber amounted to 52,729,965 feet B.M., or over 15,000,000 
more than that for the previous season. 

The quantity of pulpwood taken off Crown Lands last season was 306,696 
cords or 13,499 cords less than in 1918-19. 

For several years previous to 1918-19 little railway construction was attempted 
but in that season the demand for ties increased the production from 2.094,099 
taken out in 1917-18 to over 5,000,000 for season 1918-19, The number of ties 
taken out during the season of 1919-20 was 6,102,287 or 961,633 greater than in 
1918-19. 

Lands Under License. 

The area under license at the close of the fiscal year was 14,8951/4 square miles, 
a reduction of 1,33534 square miles from the previous year. 

Summary of Eevenue From Woods and Forests. 

Bonus •• $1,143,725 18 

Timber Dues 1,171,692 14 

Ground Rent 105,398 88 

Transfer Fees 7,640 00 

Fire Protection 228,174 31 

$2,656,630 51 



1920-21 DEPARTME^^T OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 11 

A list of the timber berths sold during the year with the names of the success- 
ful purchasers and the prices paid is being prepared for the next year's report. 

The Kapuskasing Pulp Limit on the Kapuskasing River, in the Districts of 
Timiskaming and Algoma, comprising 1,740 square miles, was offered for sale in 
September, 1917, and was purchased by Messrs. S. A. Mundy and E. Stewart. 
The price or flat rate to be paid was 75c. per cord for all classes of pulpwood, and 
•$15.00 per thousand feet board measure for red and white pine. In pursuance of 
the sale an agreement was entered into between the Crown and the purchasers 
under date of 9th of February, 1918, for the effectual carrying out of the conditions 
of sale. The purchasers, on the 2nd of March, 1918, transferred their interests to 
Spruce Falls Pulp and Paper, Limited, who for divers reasons were granted exten- 
sions of time during 1919, in respect of their obligations as to the erection of 
pulp mill, etc. Operations not having been proceeded with, negotiations in 1920 
resulted in an extending agreement dated April 23rd, 1920, followed by a sub- 
stitutional agreement of the 11th of June, 1920, and by an Order-in-Council of 
the loth of June, 1920, which increased the dues payable from 75c. per cord to 
•$L15 per cord upon spruce pulpwood and to 95c. per cord upon balsam and other 
classes of pulpwood. 

On the 6th of July, 1920, Spruce Falls Pulp and Paper Company assigned 
their rights to Spruce Falls Company, Limited. Then by agreement, dated the 
4th of August, 1920, the Crown conveyed 446 acres, including the hitherto Kapus- 
kasing Colony farm, to the Company at a price of $100.00 an acre for the cleared 
land and -$2.00 an acre for the unstumped portion, while a portion of O'Brien 
Township, approximating forty square miles, was added to the pulp limit, but the 
rate for the spruce pulpwood on the additional area was fixed at $1.60 per cord 
and on the other classes of pulpwood at $1.30 per cord, the Crown having the right 
nevertheless over the whole limit to increase the rates in proportion to any general 
increase in the rates of dues payable throughout the Province, which may hereafter 
be made by amendment to the Crown Timber Regulations. 

The Spruce Falls Company have, in accordance with the agreement, under- 
taken operations on a large scale and construction is in full swing. By the 1st of 
July, 1922, a i-awmill of a minimum capacity of 70,000 feet daily, in two shifts, is 
to he in operation and by the 1st of January, 1922, a pulp mill with a daily output 
of not less than 100 tons of pulp. 

From the progress made at the writing of this report it is fully expected that 
these mills shall be completed and in running operation by the middle of next 
summer. 

The Company are required to erect a paper mill on or before the 1st of January, 
1928, with a minimum capacity of fifty tons of paper per day. 

The chain of agreements with the necessary Orders-in-Council and other data 
shall be printed in pamphlet form under another cover. 

Cullers' Examination, 

Two examinations were held during the year, one at Callander and one at 
Kenora. Twelve candidates succeeded in passing the examination and were d\ily 
granted certificates authorizing them to act as Cullers. For names of Cullers who 
passed at these examinations see page 36, Appendix 1(». For complete list of 
Culler^ see Minister's Report for 1917. 1918 and 1919. 



13 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Ceown Surveys. 

Instructions were issued to twenty Land Surveyors during the year to perform 
surveys on Crown lands in different parts of Northern Ontario. 

The work consisted of surveying base and meridian lines, outlining six and 
nine mile townships, traversing larger lakes, rivers and islands, principally on the 
head waters of the rivers flowing to James Bay, the running of timber berth lines 
and the laying out of town sites. 

No instructions were given for the subdivision of townships into farm lots, 
the area already subdivided being considerably in advance of settlement. 




Minesing Road, Algonquin Park. 



Municipal Surveys. 
■I 
Petitions for the resurvey and establishing of original road allowances were 

received from the Corporations of the Municipalities of the Township of Beverly, 
Township of Gloucester, Township of North Easthope. 

Upon the necessary Orders-in-Council being passed instructions were issued 
accordingly for such surveys and the same, w'hen completed, were duly confirmed 
or amended as provided for under the Survey Act. The Municipal Surveys, which 
were being performed under instructions prior to the present year and which were 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 13 

confirmed, are as follows, petitions of the Municipalities of : County of Bruce, 
Township of Cartwright, Township of Wainfleet. 

Detailed summary and description of the several surveys aforesaid will be 
found in Appendices 15 to 40 inclusive. 

Paeks. 

Prior to the establishment of the Department of Mines, the provincial parks 
were under the supervision of the Deputy Minister of Mines, but these were re- 
tained by the Department of Lands and Forests and are subject to its jurisdiction. 

Eondeau Provincial Park, which had been subject to the direction of the 
Department of Public Works and Highways was transferred to the Department 
of Lands and Forests by Order-in-Council, May 4th, 1920, so that the three out- 
standing parks, namely, Quetico, Algonquin and Eondeau, are now u^nder the 
direction of the Minister of Lands and Forests. (For the reports on these parks 
by the Superintendents, see Appendices 41, 42 and 49.) 

Colonization Eoads. 

At the last Session of the Legislative Assembly an Act was passed confirming 
the transfer of this Branch from the Department of Public Works, ^v'hich took 
place on March 1st, 1919. Power was also given under this Act to make grants 
to municipalities in the Colonization Eoads area towards the purchase of road- 
making machinery and materials and towards the salaries of township foremen 
on road construction. 

An Annual Eeport as to the work of the Colonization Eoads Branch will be 
found in Appendix No. 43, page 120. 

NoETHEEN Development Beanch. 

The regrettable death on June 12th, last, of Mr. J. F. Whitson, Commissioner 
of the Branch since its inception, was one of the outstanding incidents of the year. 
At his death the office of Commissioner was abolished and the operations of the 
Branch placed in charge of Mr. C. H. Fullerton, Superintendent of the Coloniza- 
tion Eoads Branch. 

The main feature of the season was the opening for traffic of the road from 
.North Bay to Sault Ste. Marie, a gap of seventeen miles between Cutler and 
Algoma Mills, having hitherto existed. 

The report of the Northern Development Branch is found in Appendix No. 
44, page 144. ... 

Kapuskasing Colony. 

Under date the 21st of February, 1920, a Commission of Enquiry by Order- 
in-Council was appointed to enquire into and report upon the administration, 
management, conduct, discipline, etc., of this colony, and any other matters or 
questions bearing -on same, to take evidence and collect information and to make 
>uch report or recommendations as deemed abvisable. 

The Commission consisted of Messrs. W. F. Nickle, chairman ; John I. 
McLaren and John Sharp and the report dated the 16th of March, 1920, was 
printed in pamphlet form by order of Legislative Assembly of Ontario. This 
report may be secured from the King's Printer. 



14 



EEPORT OP THE 



No. 3 





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1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 15 

To give effect to the recommendations contained in the report of the Com- 
mission of Enquiry, a Board of Adjustment was appointed by Orders-in-Council 
dated the 17th and 37th of April, 1930, consisting of General John Gunn, Alex- 
ander Stewart Morgan and Archibald Leitch, to which Board Dr. A. H. Abbott 
was later named as secretary. By an Act passed on the 31st of April, 1930, which 
was an amendment to the Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act, 
provisions were made for the hearing and determining of complaints, etc., and for 
the adjustment of other grievances and the awarding of grants in settlement 
thereof. 

The full report of the Board of Adjustment is contained in Appendix No. 46. 

The Provincial Colony Farm was sold to the Spruce Falls Company, Limited, 
under agreement of the 4th of August, 1920, and their pulp and other mills are 
being erected upon this land. The price paid was $100.00 an acre for the cleared 
and $8.00 an acre for the unstumped land. 

The Government proposes to establish by special legislation at the next session 
a municipality to be known as Kapuskasing, the intention being to develop an 
ideal northern town. 

Settlers' Loax. 

To the end ol' the 31st of October, 1930, 3,337 applications for loans, repre- 
senting $8,747.60 or an average of $384,61 per application were received, but only 
such applications were entertained where it was clearly shown that the money 
could be used to good advantage for the improvement of the settlement duties. 
Altogetiher ,1,^558 loans, which included one of $13,000.00 to the Sudbury Co- 
operative Creamery Company, Limited, and one of $8,000.00 to the Dairy Co- 
operative Association, have been made to settlers, these loans amounting to 
$490,836.00. 

It is gratifying to observe that over 90 per cent, of the interest payments are 
up to date and payments of principal of over 97 per cent, of the amount due. 
Appreciation has been expressed by those receiving loans of the advantages that 
have accrued to them in the work of carrying on land clearances, etc. 

For a detailed statement by the Loan Commissioner, see Appendix No. 47. 

FORESTRY BRANCH. 
Fire Protection. 

The forest fire protection work was continued this season under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Forestry Branch. The season opened with a very dry period and we 
were without rain for about two months. Practically 60 per cent, of the season's 
fires were recorded during this early period. 

The origin of fn-es as shown in the report of the Forestry Branch has con- 
siderable interest. We find that during this last season 83.9 per cent, of the total 
fires were of railway origin. From the report it will be seen that forest §res of 
railway origin are greatly decreasing, as the following figures will show : 

Fire? of railway origin 1917 — 49.5 per cent. 

Fires of railway origin 1918 — 46.5 per cent. 

Fires of railway origin 1919 — 37.0 per cent. 

Fires of railway origin 1920 — 23.9 per cent. 



16 EEPOET OF THE ' No. 3 

The above improvement is due to increased protective metliods applied along 
railway lines, but evidently from the report it is greatly owing to the increased 
efficiency of locomotive inspection work. This work, which is carried out by 
provincial officers under the jurisdiction of the Board of Railway Commissioners 
of Canada, is assisting to a large extent in the elimination of railway fires. 

One interesting feature of the report is the fact that 65.5 per cent, of the 
season's fires originated in cut-over areas in which the logging slash created a 
serious fire hazard. This again emphasizes the necessity for further measures in 
connection with the solving of the slash disposal problem. 

During the past season 6,154 permits were issued for the burning of slash. 
The slash on 22,767 acres was burned under the issuing of these permits. 

FoEEST Investigation. 

The Forestry Branch has carried on during the past season a new line of work 
in connection with forest survey and land classification. This work is being done 
in the southern part of the Huron and Ottawa region, covering the southern 
portion of the Fire District. The survey is being done to differentiate forest land 
from agricultural land and to record the various features of the region from the 
standpoint of future forest management. One million seven hundred and twenty 
thousand acres were covered during the past season, and it is predicted that all 
of the region south of Lake Nipissing will be finished during the coming season. 
This is the -first work done in connection with the plan of a definite forest recon- 
naissance of the Province. 

Refokestation. 

The work connected with reforestation has been enlarged along the following 
lines. The equipment and nursery organization at the Provincial Forest Station 
at Norfolk has been enlarged in order to meet the growing demands for forest 
planting stock. During the past season the Forestry Branch were able to secure 
a very fine lot of native forest tree seeds, which will be used in the further pro- 
duction of nursery stock to facilitate this work. The distribution of trees was 
again carried on, over some 130,000 trees having been shipped out to various appli- 
cants. It is interesting to note that these forest plantations, which are made by 
way of demonstration, and for educational purposes, are having a splendid effect 
in influencing local opinion along these lines. 

Tree Diseases. 

Durino- last summer Dr. J. H. Faull continued his investigations of diseases 
of trees in Northern Ontario, his chief work being connected with studies of com- 
mercial trees in Temagami Forest Reserve region. Details of this work are given 
in the Forestry Branch Report, and evidently the problem of forest tree diseases 
will require considerable investigation as it appears that it will influence future 
cutting methods and policy as to future sales. See Appendix No. 48, page 206, 

Beniah Bowman, 

Minister. 

Department of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, October 31ts, 1920. 



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EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



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1920 21 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



23 



Appendix No. S. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased. Amount of Sales and Leases and Amount of Collections 
for the year ending October 31st, 1920. 



Service. 



Acres sold 

and 

leased. 



Lands Sold: 

Agricultural and Townsites 72,591 08 

Clergy Lands 82 00 

Common School Lands i 146 25 

Gi-ammar School Lands 151 00 

University Lands 720 87 

Lands Leasid: 

Crown I 10,661 18 

t 

Temagami 27 43 



Amount of 

sales and 

leases. 



Collection 

on sales 

and leases. 



84,379 81 



69,956 87 

57 40 

200 77 

231 00 

360 44 

1,845 06 
310 00 

72,961 54 



81,480 12 

862 21 

5.527 74 

756 16 

1,806 18 

58,444 18 
1,139 00 

150,015 59 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



34 



EEPOBT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4- 

Statement of Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1920. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Land Cot.lections. 
Crown Lands: 

Agricultural 

Townsites 

! 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands 


72,831 80 
8,648 32 

862 21 
5,527 74 

756 16 
1,806 18 


81,480 12 

8,952 29 

57,195 33 
1,248 85 
1,139 00 




Grammar School Lands 




University Lands 








Rent: 

Crown Leases 




90,432 41 


A Igonquin Provincial Park 






Temagami Leases 










59,583 18 


Woods and Forests. 


1,143,725 18 
1,171,692 14 

105,398 88 
7,640 00 

228,174 31 

69,524 07 
657 77 
719 00 


Timber Dues . 






Ground Rent ... 


















Parks : 




2,656,630 51 


















70,900 84 


CflQnii.l TTppQ 


2,112 61 

188 00 
378 00 

14,972 60 

18.241 05 

100 00 

3 08 

50 00 

2,402 45 

2 40 

50 00 


Cullers' Fees .••••• ••• •• 












Refunds. 




2,678 61 








Afi'pTit*^* Ralfl.rip«5 . 










































30,821 58 












■ 


2,911,047 13 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



25 



Appendix No. 5. 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 
October 31st, 1920, which are considered as Special Funds. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Clergy Lands. 
Principal 


450 70 
411 51 




Interest r 






Common School Lands. 


862 21 


Principal 


3,228 30 
2.299 44 


Interest 






Grammar School Lands. 


5,527 74 


Principal 


385 90 
370 26 


Interest 






University Lands. 


756 16 


Principal 


1,164 52 
641 66 




Interest 








1 806 18 










8,952 29 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



26 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Appendix No. 6. 

Statement of Disbursements of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year 

ending October 31st, 1920. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


Agents' Salabies and Disbtjbsements. 
Lfind, $20,120.72. 
Anderson, T. V 


800 00 
158 75 


953 75 
254 41 

855 77 

1.417 97 
200 00 

621 99 
941 48 
526 00 

518 00 
1,157 00 

510 00 

521 00 
500 00 

519 00 
1,182 00 
1,297 95 

269 50 

890 00 

638 47 
700 00 




Disbursements 




Arthurs, E 




Baker, R. H 


350 00 

5 77 

1,200 00 
217 97 




Disbursements 




Bolger, J. W. 




Disbursements 




Both, C . . ... 




Brown, John 


600 00 
21 99 




Disbursements 








Burrows, W. A 


583 00 
358 48 

500 00 
26 00 




Disbursements 




Cameron, W 




Disbursements 








Campbell, Miss I. M 


500 00 
18 00 

1,100 00 
57 00 




Disbursements 




Dempsay, S. J 




Disbursements 








Dodds, T 


500 00 
10 00 




Disbursements 








Disbursements 


500 00 
21 00 




Ellis, H. J 


• 


Freeborn^ J. ,S 


500 00 
19 00 












Gibson, J. E 


1,000 00 
182 00 




Disbursements 








Ginn, F E 


1.200 00 
97 95 

250 00 
19 50 

300 00 
90 00 

' 600 00 
38 47 








Hales, W 




Disbursements 

Hollands, C J . . 




Disbursements 




McFayden, A, 




Disbursements 




MacLiennan J K 












13,474 29 











192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



27 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



Brought forward 

Agents' Salaries and Disbubsements- 

Land — Concluded. 
Noble, E. 



-Continued. 



Disbursements 



Parsons, W. J. . . 
Disbursements 



Philion, J. A 

Disbursements 



Prince, A 

Disbursements 



Small, R 

Disbursements 



Spry. W. L 

Disbursements 

O'Flaherty T. F. 
Disbursements 



Teasdale. R. A. . . 
Disbursements 



Thaw, D 

Disbursements 



Watt, F. 



Whybourne, W. E. 
Disbursements 



WooUings, J 

Disbursements 



Wilson, A. N 

Disbursements 



Homestead Inspectors. $21,725.39. 



Barr. J 

Disbursements 



Bastien, J. A. ... 
Disbursements 



Brown. J. B 

Disbursements 



Burns, C. W 

Disbursements 



Cragg. W. V 

Disbursements 



Dean. T 

Disbursements 



300 00 
12 30 



1,000 00 
169 00 


500 00 
29 02 


333 32 

40 00 


500 00 
23 25 


300 00 
193 50 


276 30 
96 75 


600 00 

4 77 



500 00 
6 27 



300 00 
8 45 

800 00 
165 00 



175 00 
13 50 



1,400 00 
681 12 



1,200 00 
516 15 


1 , 100 00 
443 85 


500 00 
206 15 


1,400 00 
440 72 


900 00 
306 65 





Carried forivard 



13.474 29 

312 30 
1.169 00 
529 02 
373 32 
523 25 
493 50 
373 05 
604 77 



506 27 
300 00 



308 45 
965 00 
188 50 

2,081 12 
1 .716 15 
1,543 85 
706 15 
1,840 72 
1.206 65 



29.215 36 



38 



EEPOET OP THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 


Brought forward 




29,215 36 

1,824 60 

790 55 

1,893 45 

3,963 75 
2.057 45 
2,082 27 

1,815 64 
2.045 71 
2.175 35 
2,403 82 
2,446 50- 

3,570 45 
2,195 15 

4,686 43 
1,757 77 
2,489 62 




Agents' Salaeies and DiSBURSEMENTS^ConiinMed. 

Homestead Inspectors — Concluded. 
Hughes, T 


1,300 00 
524 60 




Disbursements 








Jervis, H. F. J. W ; 


586 30 
204 25 




Disbursements 








Owens, H. B 


1,000 00 
893 45 




Disbursements 








Smith, D 


1,700 00 
1,144 31 
1,119 44 




Van Horn, L. E., Assistant 

Disbursements 








Watson, T. P 


1,400 00 
657 45 




Disbursements ; 








Wigle, R. G 


1,400 00 
682 27 




Disbursements 








hJremner, G 


1,350 00 
465 64 




Disbursements 








Christie, W. P 


1,700 00 
345 71 




Disbursements 








Hawkins, S. J 


1.900 00 
275 35 








Henderson, C 


2,100 00 
303 82 




Disbursements 




Huckson, A. H 


2,100 00 
346 50 








Jones, W. M 


1,700 00 

1,500 00 

370 45 




McDonald, A 












MacDonald, S C 


2,000 00 
195 15 

1.600 00 

1,900 00 

382 75 

98 00 

14 00 

21 00 

670 68 




Disbursements 


, 


Margach, W 




I^egris, J., Assistant 




Cunningham, Mrs. E. A., Stenographer 




Robinson, Miss E. do 








Disbursements 








McDonald, H 


1,600 00 
157 77 














2,100 00 
389 62 




Disbursements 








Carried forward 


67,413 87 





192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



29 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




67,413 87 

3,164 01 

2.177 26 
642 31 

2,158 30 

28 75 
50 00 

50 00 

1.478 95 




Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Concluded. 

Timber — Concluded. 
Oliver, J A 


■ 

1,850 00 

722 31 

36 93 

554 77 




Godfrey, Miss S., Stenographer 

Keefer, Miss 0., Stenographer 

Disbursements 








Stevenson, A 


1,800 00 
377 26 




Disbursements 








Whelan P J , disbursements 






Wood, W G. A 


1.600 00 
558 30 




Disbursements 








Miscellaneous, $1,607.70. 

EJdmond, John, inspecting certain lands in the 
Townships of Gorham and Ware . 






Green. H. P., Caretaker, Islands in Charlaton Lake 

Jamieson, W. H., Caretaker. Islands in Dog and 
Laboria Lakes 










McArthur, T. A., Inspector of Agencies 

Disbursements 


900 00 
578 95 












77,163 45 


• 
Ottawa Agency. 
Darby, E J Agent 


1,500 00 
1,200 00 

766 03 

8 00 
14 25 


Larose S C Clerk 






Rent 


700 00 
66 03 




Disbursements 








Cullers' Act. 

Margach, W Services 

McDougall, J. T Disbursements 

F^K Ranging 




3.466 03 








22 25 

504.518 42 


FoRiJST Ranging 






207.675 13 


PoBEST Reserves . . . 






4.456 36 


Reforestation. ... 






47,454 72 


Algonquin Provincial Park 






34 739 55 


Quetico Provincial Park . . 






10 260 90 










Carried forward 




889,756 81 









30 



EEPOKT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 



Brought forward 

Rondeau Provincial Park ' . . . 

Purchase and Maintenance of Automobiles. 

Surveys ■ 

Colonization Roads 

Board of Surveyors 

Grant to Canadian Forestry Association . . . 

Annual Membership Fees 

Insurance 

Commissions re Sundry Investigations . . . . . 

Workmen's Compensation 

Unforeseen and Unprovided 



Special Warrants. 
Hurdman, G. G. . . 
Brown, Mrs. Ella 



Miscellaneous. 

Maughan, Mrs. H. L., gratuity 



Refunds (Miscellaneous) 



Contingencies, Plans, Maps, Etc. 
Departmentnl. 



Printing and binding 
Stationery 



Express 
Postage 



Telegraphing 
Car Fare . . . 



Subscriptions 
Advertising . 



Typewriter repairs and inspections 



Hutcheon, J., disbursements 
Work, J., services 



Extra Clerks 

Maps 

Sundries' . . . . 



4,771 63 
8,068 22 



846 44 
2,213 43 

908 18 
50 00 



Carried forward 



254 71 
2,509 25 


7 80 
61 60 

11,023 98 

'5,874 38 

371 80 



5.680 00 
210 00 



839 85 
559 87 
958 18 



,763 96 
205 90 



69 40 



17,270 16 



889,756 81 

9,736 57 

2,084 49 

150,700 97 

451,808 59 

200 00 

1,000 00 

39 97 

417 72 

50,000 00 

394 64 

60 75 



5,890 00 
875 00 

15,757 74 



36,667 32 
1,615.390 57 



1920-21 DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



31 



Appendix No. 6. — Continued. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 






1,615,390 57 


Travelling Expenses. 
Bowman Hon Beniah 




1,110 52 

71 40 

98 50 

454 27 

160 45 

150 00 

374 93 

299 35 

2 00 


Cain W C 






Grigg A '. . 






Hutcheon, J 




- 


Niven F J '. 






Robbins, H. M 






Rorke L V 






Work, J ( 






Sundries 






Typewriters, Office Equipment, EItc. 
United Typewriter Company 




2,721 42 
422 00 


Forestry Contingencies. 
Printing and Binding 


140 30 
880 73 

205 00 

58 76 . 

59 58 
22 00 


1,021 03 

345 34 
727 12 


Stationery ..••••............ i. . 




Telegraphing 








Typewriter, inspections and repairs 








Extra Clerks 


327 50 

385 49 

14 13 








Sundries 






2,093 49 
18 45 


Colonization Road Contingencies. 
Printing and binding 


327 54 
736 66 

160 42 
4 70 

105 45 
12 14 
35 50 

1,786 96 
53 65 


1,064 20 
165 12 

153 09 

1,840 61 

200 52 
736 04 




Stationery 




Postage 




Express 




Telegraphing 




Subsrriptions 




Typewriter, inspections and repairs 




Extra Clerks 

Sundries ,, . 




Travelling Expenses. 
Pullerton. C. H 


3,223 02 


Meader, C. H 










936 56 
1,624.805 51 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



33 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 
Woods and 

Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground 

Quantity and 





Area 
covered 

by 
timber 
licenses. 


Saw logs. 


Boom and 


Agencies. 


Pine. 


Other. 


Pine. 




Square 
miles. 


Pieces. 


FeetB.M. 


Pieces. Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Western Timber 
District 

Belleville Timber 
District 

Ottaw^a Timber 
District 


9,578 

696i 

4, 620 J 


8,009,862 

47,615 

540,095 


277.823,470 

1,105.051 

24,221,618 


1,044,322 
132,874 
478,831 


33,120,876 

4.238,767 

13.428.889 


23,225 

86,892 

3.344 


3,459,426 

1,387,121 

464,689 




14,895i 


8,597,572 303,150,139 


1,656,027 


50,788,532 


113,461 


5,311,236 



General Statement 



Agencies. 


Tan 
Bark. 


Railway 
Ties. 


Shingle 
Bolts. 


Cedar 
Posts. 


Tele- 
graph 
Poles. 


Pulp- 
wood. 






Cords. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Transfer 
Fees. 


Interest. 


Western Timber 
District 

Belleville Timber 
District 

Ottawa Timber 
District 


2,193J 

235 

1,011 

3, 439 J 


6.070,883 

5,403 

26,001 


3 


27,457 

6,156 

16.104 


10,977 

16 

7.061 


288.955 

387 

17.354 


$ c. 
7,270 00 

365 00 

5 00 


$ c. 
18,500 44 

4 93 

632 43 




6,102,287 


3 


49,717 


18,054 


306,696 


7,640 00 


19,137 80 



JOHN HOUSER, 

Chief Clerk in charge. 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OP LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



33 



No. 7. 
Forests. 

Rent and Bonus during tlie year ending 31st October, 1920. 
DESCRIPTION OF TIMBER. 



Dimension. 




■r;,..i 


Pine. 




Tin: , 




Cedar. 

Lineal 
Feet. 


Cordwood. 


Other. 






Hard. 


Soft. 


Pieces. 


Feet 
B.M. 


Pieces. j,gg^ 


Lineal 
Feet. 


'^e'.f P'-- 


Feet 
B.M. 


Cords. 


Cords. 


104,62 
810 


1.115,432 
174.923 


7,176 


365,086 


27.368 


176,059 


4,852 


468,296 


13,609 


13,065 
144 


23,214 

Q 


4.507 614,611 
















1 
18 1 QS7 




. ^ . 1 - . . 














15.779 1.904,966 


7,176 365,086 27,368 


176,059 


4,852 


468,296 


13,609 


13,227 


25,160 



of Timber.— Concluded. 



Amounts accrued. 



Trespass. 



Timber 
dues. 



Bonus Deposit Ground Fire I Total 

timber sales. rent. protection. \ 



$ c! $ c. $ c. 

53,767 891,204,984 1111,219,548 78 



C.i 



3.263 02j 8.295 16 
567 17; 57,906 04 



389 38 



211.848 OO; 74,691 75 

4,175 00 

26.420 00 



c. $ c. $ c. 

188,411 2l| 2.979,022 18 



5,24160! 21.734 09 



34.521 50 



120.052 14 



57.598 08:1.271,185 31 



1,219,938 161 211,848 00 105,286 75 228.174 31 3,120,808 41 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister. 



3 L.F. 



34 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Appendix No. 8. 

PATENTIS OFFICE (Lands Branch) . 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued from 1st November, 1919, to 31st October, 1920. 



Public Lands (late Crown) 561 

(late School) 31 

• " " (late Clergy Reserves) 6 

(University) 5 

Free Grant Lands (Act of 1913) 354 

" (Act of 1901) Veterans 79 

Mining Lands (Patents; . . 409 

Mining Leases 116 

Crown Leases 21 

Licenses of Occupation 54 

Temagami Island Leases 15 

Sand and Gravel Licenses 19 

Pine Patents 5 

Quarry Claims 1 

Orders-in-Council 4 

Total 1,680 

C. S. JONES, ALBERT ORIGG, 

Clerk of Patents. Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 

W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 35 



Appendix No. 9. 

WOODS AND FORESTS BRANCH. 

Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending October 31st, 1920. 

Amount of Western Collections at Department $2,531,137 18 

Belleville Collections at Department 16,625 32 

" Ottawa Collections at Department , 108,868 01 



$2,656,630 51 

WOODS AND FORESTiS. 

Bonus $1,143,725 18 

Timber dues 1,171,692 14 

Ground rent . . 105,398 88 

Transfer fees 7,640 00 

Fire protection 228,174 31 



$2,656,630 51 



WOODS AND FORESTS BRANCH REVENUE. 

October 31st, 1920. 

Western District — 

Timber dues $1,098,718 60 

Bonus 931,697 18 

Ground rent 74,691 75 

Interest on dues 18,460 24 

Interest on ground rent 40 20 

Transfer fees 7,270 00 

Timber sale deposit 211,848 00 

Fire protection 188,411 21 



Ottawa District — 

Timber dues $47,289 08 

Ground rent 26,420 00 

Interest on dues .........*.* • 560 50 

Interest on ground rent . . 71 93 

Transfer fees 5 00 

Fire protection 34,521 50 

Belleville District — 

Timber dues $6,658 79 

Bonus 1 180 00 

Ground rent 4,175 00 

Interest on timber dues 4 93 

Transfer fees 365 00 

Fire protection 5,241 60 



$2,531,137 18 



$108,868 01 



$16,625 32 
$2,656,630 51 



JOHN HOUSER, ALBERT GRIQG, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. Deputy Minister. 



36 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix 10. 

Memorandum of parties who passed the Oullers' Examination in 1920. 

Allanson, J. G., Osaquan, Ont., examined at Kenora on the 27th day of August, 1920, 
licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Campbell, G. K., Poplar Dale, Ont., examined at Callander on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Duval, Alex., Sturgeon Falls, Ont., examined at Callander, on the 27th day of 
August, 1920, licensed October Ist, 1920. 

Fry, John T. G., Trout Creek, Ont., examined at Callander on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Leach, Charles, Osaquan, Ont., examined at Kenora on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Morrison, Bert, Field P.O., Ont., examined at Callander on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

McDougall, C, Mcintosh P.O., Ont., examined at Kenora on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Pritchard, Fred, Norman, Ont., exam^ined at Kenora on the 27th day of August, 
1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

iRoss, Alexander, Foleyette, Ont., examined at Callander on the 27th day of August, 
1920. licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Rudd, W. J., 133 North Marks Street, Fort William, Ont., examined at Kenora on 
the 27th day of August, 1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

-Spofford, R. L., 322 Van Norman Street, Port Arthur, Ont., examined at Kenora 
on the 27th day of August, 1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

Spofford, H. S., 322 Van Norman Street, Port Arthur, Ont., examined at Kenora on 
the 27th day of August, 1920, licensed October 1st, 1920. 

JOHN HOUSBR, ALBERT GRIGG, 

V Chief Clerk. Deputy Minister. 



Appendix 11. 

Statement of the work done in Military Office, Lands Branch of the Department of Lands 
and Forests, during the year ending October 31st, 1920. 

Reference for Veterans' Patents issued 69 

Locations under military certificates 35 

Certificates applied in payment of lands 7 

Certificates surrendered for commutation money 1 

Letters received .... . . . .i 1,410 

Letters written 1,640 

Special letters to agents .' 240 

Special letters to mining recorders 180 

Maps and reports supplied to veterans 90 

Printed forms sent out 100 

Copies of Veteran Act supplied 40 

H. E. JOHNSTON, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Military Clerk. Deputy Minister. 

W. C. CAIN, ■ 
Chief Clerk in Charge. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 37 

Appendix No. 12. 

Records Branch, 1919-1920. 
Communications received: 

From Crown Lands Agents 8,497 

Crown Timber Agents 5,076 

" Mining Recorders 2,947 

" Homestead Inspectors 2,178 

" Crown Land Inspector of Agencies 36 

" Superintendent Algonquin Park 198 

" Superintendent Quetico Park 77 

" Superintendent Rondeau Park 76 

Orders-in-Council 210 

Telegrams 203 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Letters! ! 230 

Nickel Commission (figures supplied iby them — Nov. and Dec.) 50 

Northern Development Branch (figures supplied by them) 7,745 

Loan Commissioner (figures supplied by them) 3,219 

Forestry Branch (figures supplied by them) 20,872 

Mining Commissioner (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 627 

Mine Assessor, (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 875 

Provincial Geologist (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 102 

Mine Inspector (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 211 

Colonization Roads (figures supplied by them) 6,000 

Colonization Branch (figures supplied by them — Nov. 1/19, Mar. 12/20) . . . 7,147 

All other sources 29,0'47 

Total incoming (Minister's office not included) 95,623 

Communications sent out: 

To Crown Agents, Inspectors and Park Superintendents 22,000 

" General Public 21,075 

Circular Letters (timber sales) •••••• 3,537 

Maps and Blue Prints 4,254 

Mining Reports to Foreign Countries (Nov. and Dec.) 20 

" " U. S. and other points (Nov. and Dec.) 10 

Acts (Nov. and Dec.) 100 

Nickel Commission, Letters (figures supplied iby them — Nov. and Dec.) 50 

" " Reports (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) . . 45 

Northern Development Branch (figures supplied by them). Letters 7,248 

" " Branch, Seed Grain (figures supplied by them) .... 1,578 

Colonization B,r. (figures supplied by them — Nov. 1/19 to Mar. 12/20) 4,848 

" " Northern Ontario Literature (figures supplied by them' — 

Nov. 1/9 to Mar. 12/20 13,18» 

" " Ontario Maps (figures supplied by them — ^Nov. 1/19, to 

MaT. 12/20) 3482 

Loan Commissioner, Letters (figures supplied by them) 6,202 

Mining Commissioner, Letters (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) . 1,235 

" " Orders (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) . 102 

Forestry Branch, Letters (figures supplied iby them) 4,903 

" " Parcels by Post (figures supplied by them) 451 

Mine Assessor, Letters (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 875 

Mine Inspector, Letters (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec.) 151 

Provincial Geologist, Letters (figures supplied by them — Nov. and Dec). 90 

Colonization Roads, Letters (figures supplied by them) 5,355 

Total outgoing (Minister's office not included) 100,498 

Postage: 

Postage for the year Records Branch ?2,141 42 

" Nov. and Dec. Mines " 185 58 

" the year Colonization Branch (Nov. 1, 1920, to Mar. 

12, 1920) 246 91 

" " " Loan Commissioner 210 00 

Forestry Branch 205 00 

" " " Colonization Roads 20O 00 

FUea: 

New Files issued . . General 4,864 

" " " . . Accounts chargeable ^ 569 

" " " . . Accounts free 114 

S. K. BURDIN, ALBERT GRIGG, 

Chief Clerk, Records Branch. Deputy Minister. 



38 



EEPOET OP THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IS. 



Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of acres sold ; 
of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties and of patents issued in 
Free Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1920. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


o 

CO 

H 

•M Cd 

52; 


m 

4) 

. o 


CO 

« 

CO 


Pi 

O 

6 


No. of acres sold. 


03 

a 

P< 4) 

<4-C « 

2; 


CO . 
O CO 


5 



\^ 

i 2 

HH 
O Oi 

! . CO 
o— ' 


No. of acres 
patented. 


Baxter 


Muskoka 

Haliburton . . . 
Muskoka 

Parry Sound.. 
Parry Sound . 


J. B. Brown, Brace- 
bridge 

Miss 1. M. Campbell, 
" Parry Sound 

Dr. J. S. Freeborn, 

" Magnetawan 


1 


96 


2 


8 




5 
1 


2.58% 


Brunei 




100 


Cardwell .... 


1 

2 


82 
199 






1 
2 


82 
199 





Chaffey 








11)0 


Draper 








Franklin .... 






2 


43i 








311 


Freeman .... 


1 


196 


1 


196 




Macaulay .... 
Medora 








mo 
















Monck 


















Morrison .... 


2 


256 






1 

1 
4 
7 


95 

53 

380 

852A 




191 


Muskoka 




5 




McLean 


■ 4 
7 


500 
910J 


572 


Oakley 








Ridout .... 










2no 


Ryde 


6 


808 






6 


702 




Sherborne 








159 


Sinclair 


4 

1 


714 
121 






6 

1 


890 
121 


^^0 


Stephenson.. . 








Stisted 








R(|6 


Watt 
















Wood 

Blair 


1 


115 


4 
6 


6 
66J 


2 


232 




378 
39 


Burpee 


2 

10 
4 


291 

1,458 

390 






Carling 

Christie 


5 


151 


13 
3 


1,548 
398 




720 

■ 247 

.5% 


Conger 






Cowper 










1 
1 


9 
100 


30 
20 


Foley 


1 
4 


100 
700 






Ferguson . .. 








Hagerman . . . 














Harrison 










1 
2 


200 
400 




58 


Henvey 


4 
1 

1 
2 


595 
190 
459 
292 








Humphrey ... 






2 
3 
2 

3 
1 

1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 


140 


McConkey.... 
McDougall . . . 
McKellar .... 


1 
2 


2 

51 


2 

1 


300 
101 


451 

185i 

197 


McKenzie .... 


1 
9 


200 
1,348 


1 
4 


2 

108 






2 


Monteith 

Shawanaga . . 


2 


307 


396 
214 


Wilson 

Chapman 


2 

2 
3 


3.S3 

275 
404 


4 


665 


1 

1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
5 
2 


137 

99 
200 

99 
400 
399 
596 
400 


7 
356 


Croft 










209 


Ferrie , 






96 


Gurd 

Lount 


3 
3 
3 
2 
1 


373 

449 
398 
400 
100 


1 


1 


1 
600 


Machar 






176 


Mills 

Pringle 


2 


m 


114 
100 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



39 



Appendix No. 13. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


CO 


O 

2 • 
d-S 


CO 

0) 

d—* 


CO 

« 
to 

"S 

d 


No. of acres sold. 

No. of persons 
cancelled. 


d >-> 


e 
S 

«t-i s 

O CO 

. to 


to . 

11 
It 

'Z, 


Ryerson .... ParrvSonnH. . 


Dr. J. S. Freeborn, 

Magnetawan 

David Thaw, Emsdale 

H. J. Ellis, Powassan. 

W. J. Parsons, North 
" Bay 

R. H. Baker, Minden. . 


8 

3 
1 

3 


300 

■ 600 
100 

303 






2 

3 
3 

5 
6 
4 
4 


200 

500 
212 

574 
762 
701 

500 






Spence ..... 


Parry Sound.. 




m 

42 
216 






Strong 






Armour 

Bethune 


3 


303 


Joly 


5 
3 


902 
500 




123 

88 


4 
4 


532 


McMurrich .. . 
Perry 


" 


384 


Proudfoot .... " 


1 

1 
5 
1 
1 
2 

13 
7 
3 
1 


100 

100 
901 
200 
100 
396 

1,395 

1,005 

508 

100 






2 

1 

3 
2 

1 

1 

7 
1 
1 
1 


291 

200 
412 
303 
184 
194 

640 
100 
105 
100 


2 

1 
3 
3 
2 
4 

11 


200 


Hardy 

Himsworth . . 

Laurier 

Nipissing .... 


Parry Sound . . 

Nipissing .... 
Haliburton ... 




11 

100 

69 


11 
500 
470 
300 


Patterson.... 






660 


Bonfield 

Boulter 


2 


29 


1,190 


Chisholm 

Ferris 


1 


6 


5 
8 


737 
1,093 


Anson 








Hindon i " 


William Hales, Apsley 

A. N. Wilson, Kinmount 

W. J. Douglas, May- 

" "nooth 
•> it 

•< >■ 
Frank Blank. Wilno... 


2 


225 


... 




3 


398 


2 


364 




1 


35 






2 


122 


4 
1 

1 


400 


Minden " 






100 


Suowdon .... 


Peterborough . 

Haliburton . . . 
Peterborough , 

Haliburton . . . 

Hastings 














100 


Stanhope 


2 

3 

4 
1 
4 


341J 

578 
391 
175i 
401 






1 

3 
2 


201 

578 
198 




Ansiruther ... 
Burleigh, N.D. 


1 


24 


1 


98 


S.D. 










Chandos ..... 










4 


617 


Methuen 












Cardiff 


8 


1.216 






5 


800 


2 
5 
3 

4 


250 


Cavendish. . . . 


2 
1 

1 

4 
1 


28 

5 

85 

99 
4 


483 


Galway 

Monmouth ... 

Bangor 


2 
6 

4 


200 
682 

357 


4 
4 

6 


426 
446 

643 


306 
425 


Carlow 1 


1 


85 














Dungannon .. 
Faraday 


5 
8 
8 
2 
1 
3 
1 

\ 


637 

1,152 

1,048 

187 

91 

225J 
101 
101 
202 


1 


llj 


2 
4 
5 
2 


804 
419J 
815 
187 


3 

4 
8 


291 
550 


Herschel i 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1.008 J 


Mayo j 


1 
8 
2 
1 


194 


Monteagle . . . : 
McClure ' 


4 


165 


1 


50^ 


1.286 
201 


Wicklow 1 " 






1 
2 


101 
295 


50 


Wollaston....! 








Algona, S. ... 


Renfrew 






2 
8 
2 


218 


Brougham.... 

Brudenell 

Burns 




8 

4 

1 


220 
441 
100 


3 
1 


140 
200 


1 

1 
3 


100 
200 
400 


966 
228 



40 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


1 

o o 
. o 


No. of acres 
located. 


CO 

1 

6 


2 
'o 

O 

6 

Ik- -^ 


3 

Pi V 

o C 
d '^ 


No. of acres 
resumed. 


OB 

1 

H 

<t-l 

o eo 
. « 


No. of acres 
patented. 


Grattan 


Renfrew 


Frank Blank, Wilno ..( 


3 


288 






1 


49 


3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
5 
4 
2 


.304 


Griffith 


t 




II 1 

« • 
II i 
II 1 
II 1 
II 1 

II 1 








50 


Hagarty 

Jones 


1 
2 
4 
5 
2 

10 
5 
2 


200 
319J 
730 
4471 
194 
1,148 
476 
277 


1 


101 


4 


4601 


402 
932 


Lyell 






4 
3 


365 
290 


510 


Lyndoch 






125 


Matawatchan . 






955 


Radcliffe .... 

Raglan 

Richards .... 


4 
1 
1 


122 
13 
1| 


4 
4 


521 

499 


371 
240 


Sebastopol . . 










Sherwood .... 


1 


100 






1 

1 


200 
100 


3 


506 


Algona, N. . . . 


Renfrew 


Finlay Watt, Pem hrnkft 


1 


95 




Alice 




• 


II 
II 
II 
II 

II 
II 
„ 




1 
3 


5 
356 


3 


150 


Buchanan 


3 


140 


2 


167 




Clara 






Fraser 


1 


1831 














Head 






1 


85 






Maria 














McKay 


















Petawawa . . . 


2 
2 


200 
289 














Rolph 

Wilberforce . . 


1 


50 


1 


100 


1 

1 
2 

2 
1 


425 
100 


Wylie (pt.) . . . 


1 

1 
9 


82 

100 
902 






1 

1 
3 


82 

100 
300 


282 


Calvin 


Nipissing .... 
« 

«• 


Robt. Small, Mattawa 
•• 11 

II 11 

•1 II 

•1 II 






200 


Cameron (pt.). 






153 


Lauder 








Mattawan.. .. 


1 
4 


100 
400 














Papineau .... 






3 
1 


300 
80 


3 


500 


Korah 


Algom 


a 








Parke 


ii 












1 
1 

8 


640 


Prince 


Algoma 

<• 

<• 

Algoma 

Algoma 

Thunder Bav. 












4 
2 


423 
2045 


160 


Aberdeen .... 


Thos. Dodds, Thessalon 
II 11 

11 11 

11 II 

11 II 

W. E. Whybourne. 

MarksTille 

Edward Arthurs, 

" Espanola 

J. A. Olivftr. Port, 


1 


1145 






7855 


ad. 








Galbraith .... 


] 


162 










1 


153 J 


Lef roy 












Plummer .... 














4 


356 


ad. 
















St. Joseph Is'd 


7 

12 
6 

4 
3 
6 
3 
2 


775 

1,760 
864 

640 

4865 

7545 

316 

3095 






8 

1 
2 

20 
3 

11 
6 
2 


858 

160 
2565 

3,200 
471 

1,7175 
6615 
304 


3 

2 

6 

2 

5 
1 
10 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 

1 


300 


Baldwin 

Merritt 


1 


i 


3175 
9175 


Blake 






320 


Conmee 

Crooks 








' Arthur 


1 


7 


8OO5 
160 


Dawson Road. 
Dorion 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 




26 


118 


948 
163 


Gillies 






306 


Gorham 

Lybster 


. 1 


127 


2 
1 

1 


140 
995 
5 


2 


3455 


458 
151 


Marks 

McGregor .... 


5 
2 


745 
120 


3 

7 


499 
933 


3215 
351 


Mclntyre . . . . 































192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



41 



Appendix No. 13. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


ea 

a 
o 

. o 


C0 

o o 
. o 


CO 

u 

1 


CO 

to 

2 

e« 

o 
6 


CO 



Si 


CO . 

la 


09 



s 

2 

•t-l 
O CO 
. CO 

S5 


CO . • 

CO c 

:z; 


O'Connnr 


Thunder Bay. J. A. 

« 
« 

Rainy River.. Willia 
<t 

Rainy River.. Alex. J 

II 
It 
II 

II 


liver, Port 

" Arthur 

11 1 

II II 

<( 11 

m Cameron, 

Stratton 
■> II 

■1 11 
II II 

II II 
■1 II 

1 II 

1 II 

1 II 
IcFayden, Emo. 

1 II 

1 11 
I II 
1 II 
1 •< 

ibson, Dryden.. 

1 II 
I i< 

1 II 










1 

2 


162 
323 


3 
3 

1 
1 


476 


Oliver 

Paipoonge.N K 
SR 


1 


168 


1 


1 


483} 
100 














193 


Pardee 


1 

3 
5 

34 
2 
4 


120 
480 
652 
4. 866 J 
314 
640J 






3 
4 
7 

26 
2 
9 


467 

639 

1.0501 

4,090 

314 

1,484 




Pearson . . 






3 
1 
1 
4 
14 


502 


Scoble 

Stirling 

Strange... ..r.. 
Ware 

Alwood 


2 
18 

1 
3 


97} 
1,214 
138 
2111 


159} 
158} 
629 
1,389 


Blue 


2 
1 
11 
1 
2 
6 
1 
9 
2 
3 


319 
]62 

1,519 
162 
242 
7731 
111 

1,1645 
201 
360J 






4 

1 
7 
1 
2 
8 
3 
5 
1 
3 


643 
162 

1,118 
162 
242 

1,177 

. 447 

562 

162 

459 


3 


394 


Curran 


1 
1 

I 


2 

1} 

1} 




Dewart 






Dilke 

Morley 


1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
2 


82 
79i 


Morson 

McCrosson . . . 
Nelles 


3 
1 


113 

80 


334} 

315 

241 


PattuUo 

Pratt 


3 
1 


7 
80i 


163 


Rosebery .... 






Shenston 






2 
2 
2 
1 


6 
114} 
99 
160 






4 
3 
3 
3 
5 
2 
1 

2 


448 


Sif ton 

Spohn 

Sutherland... 
Tait 


5 
8 
5 
2 
6 


7171 
l,166i 
834i 
244 
923J 


7 
6 
8 
5 
6 


814| 
989} 

1.308} 
628 

1,016 


418} 
572 
400} 
644 


Tovell 

Worthington.. 




2 


234} 
158 


Aylsworth . 


1 


169 










204} 


Barwick .... 












Burriss 














1 
2 


160 


Carpenter .... 


2 
1 
2 


223 
40^ 
317i 






2 


223 


237} 


Crozier 








Dance 






3 


478 


1 
2 

2 


160 


Devlin 




4 


113} 
249} 


Dobie 


1 


80i 


1 


80i 


Fleming 






Kingsford 


4 


635i 






4 


635} 






Lash 










Mather 

Miscampbell . 


2 
2 
2 
3 


333 
319} 
319 
564} 




15} 


3 
3 
3 


490} 

479 

670} 


1 
1 


175} 
160} 


Potts 






Richardson... 








Roddick 














Woodyatt .... 














1 

2 
2 
3 


147 


Aubrey 

Britton 

Eton 


Kenc 


ra J. E. G 


8 
3 
8 
3 
4 
3 
3 


1,1091 
481 

1.260 
477 
552 
445i 
437 


1 

1 
1 
2 


83 
2} 

m 

91 


5 

1 
7 
3 
1 
2 


586i 
162} 
1,100} 
461 
144 
239} 
322} 


333 
322 

400 


Langton 


Melgund 






Mutrie 






Redvers 










Rowell 


1 


79 








Rugby 


i 160 
7 8531 
4 509^ 


1 
5 
4 


160 
361 
333 






Sanford 

Southworth . . 


2 

1 


115 
20 


4 


435 


4 L.F. 











42 



KEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


« 



O 

•4-1 ei 
°§ 


CO 

o-— ' 

!z; 


2 

CO 
cS 


% 

"3 

d 

;z; 


2 

CO 



(A 

6 
:z; 


CO 

CO '^ 
u <» 

1i 


to . 

Ml 3 

CO 

a) 
d »- 


CO 

» 4j 
«y 
CO 

. to 

"^ 

:2; 


11 
11 


Temple. . 


K.enora ^-' ^•- friVisrin llrvH^n - . 


4 

2 

6 

11 

17 

9 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 

"*2 


715 
315J 
9441 
l,571i 
2,300 

1,436 
251 

160 
155 
160 
315^ 

'2391 






5 

1 

4 

6 

11 

4 
4 


847 
155J 
591 J 
9461 
1,660 

617 
699J 

160 


1 
1 

7 

2 
3 


80 


Van Hnrnp 


Kenora 

Sudbury 

Sudbury 

Nipissing .... 

Lennox and 

Addington 
Frontenac 

Lennox and 

Addington 
Frontenac 

Haliburton. . . , 
Nipissing 

Temj kaming. 


T. P. O'Flaherty, 

" Kenora 

J. K. MacLennan, Sud- 

" bury 
II II 

H " 

John Brown, Marks tay 

J. A. Philion, Sturgeon 
!! Falls 

Charles Both, Denbigh 
Unattached . . . 






160 


Wabigoon . . 






520 


Wainwright .. 
Zealand 

Melick 

Pellatt 

Balfour 


2 
11 

1 
1 


107 
661 

161 
110 


353 
115 

160 

387 


Rlp7nrH 






2 
4 


199i 


Broder 


2 

8 
1 


26 

4 

67 


. 


632 


Capreol 

Chapleau 

Dill 


2 


315J 




1 
2 


67 


3 

1 
5 
1 
1 


479J 

163 

758 

1611 

157 


200 


frflrson 











3 
1 
1 


423J 
801 
157 




















M oTfiffl n 










Neelon 


1 


15 


2 


175 


Rayside 

Appelby 

Casimir • 










8 
5 


1,275 
701 


1 


1 


1 
1 


161 
1431 


1 

1 
1 


161 
160 








159 


Hagar ....... 

Jennings 

Kirkpatrick . 


13 
1 
1 

7 

2 
2 

1 
2 
6 
3 

2 

1 


2, 064 J 
lOli 
160 

1,104 J 

320 

314J 

160^ 

304i 

6794 

586 

207 
97 


3 
2 
3 
2 

2 


259J 

3 
2391 

9 

1031 


6 


1,003 










2 
1 

3 


322 


Ratter 

Caldwell . . . 


2 


320 


164 
258 


Cosby 

Grant. . . . 












1 
3 
2 
2 


101 










440 








1 


161 


230 


Springer 

Abinger 






66 






1 


107 




Da n cm to R 








'. 


N 














1 
4 


87 
388 






1 
3 


50 

298 






Denbigh.. . 








257 


Miller (pt.) . . . 






200 






, 


























Airy 




5 


490 


1 

7 
1 


107J 

129J 

63 


2 


199 




205 


Finlayson . . . 


129 


Murchison . . 


2 

6 

7 
1 
1 


300 
779 

547i 

101 

70 




86 




■*"*l 


99 


O'Brien 

Owens 


1 


n 


1 


n 


n 


Williamson. . , 






























654 


88.8131 


196 


7.530^ 


516 


71382 f^ 


458 


53295 /rt 



No. of lots assigned 272 



No. of acres assigned 34,890 



1920 21 



DEPAETMENT OP LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



43 



By Special Regulations under Order-in-Council, dated 7th February, 1919, Returned 
Soldiers were permitted to acquire free grant locations or have their arrears due the 
Crown in respect of land for settlement purposes remitted, and the following list com- 
prises the extent of such transactions: — 

In Sale TbSritoby. 



District. 



Agency. 



Number 
Locations 



Algoma Thessalon 

Sault Ste Marie 

" Hearst 

Xipissing North Bay 

Markstoy 

Sudbury Espanola 

" Massey 

Timskaming Haileybury . . . . 

New Liskeard . 

Elk Lake 



Englehart 
Matheson . 
Cochrane . 
Unattached 



3 
1 

31 
4 
1 
2 
2 

3 

1 

9 

13 

62 

1 



No arrears 
remitted. 



Total 



133 



12 
13 



39 



172 



In Free Grant Territory. 



Parry Sound Magnetawan 

Pari*;' Sound 

Rainy River Stratton . .. 

Algoma Espanola . . . 

Sudbury Markstoy . . . 

MupkokE, Bracebridge . 



44 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. IS. — Concluded. 



ISLANDS SOLD 



Township 



District or County 



Agent 



No. of Acres 
sold 



Georgian Bay: 

Parcel 9, Island 30a . 



Parcel D 26 

*' 2B, Island 30. 

'• B278 

Island 358a 

75a 

' ' B503 

" B477 



Parry Sound . 



Miss I. M. Campbell 



SELBY DRAPER, Free Grants Clerk. 

W. C. CAIN, Chief Clerk. --[ ^ 



12 

68/100 

4.3/10 
3/10 
12/100 

1.1/10 
«_J 

641 



ALBERT GRIGG. 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



45 



Appendix No. 14. 



Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold ; of lots resumed for non-per- 
formance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than Free 
Grant during the year ending 31st October, 1920. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


to 

=1 
1" 


1 

d " 


d« 


No. of acres 
resumed. 


1 

«t-i ^ 

M 

. to 


§1 

•I 


Blount 


Temiskaming. S. .1. Deninsav. Cochrane 


158.J 
642i 
150 

1,161 
147 

2,009 
192i 

2,558| 
765 
150 
3211 
901 

l,577i 

1,445 J 
150 

1581 

160 

1561 

161i 

320 


2 
4 
1 
8 
1 

14 
2 

16 
6 
1 
3 
6 

11 
9 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


7 
5 


906J 
776 






Brower 

Calder 


Temiskaming. 






2 

3 

7 


324) 
424 


Clute 

Colquhoun .... 


5 


680 


1,072 


Fauquier 

Fournier 

Fox 


3 

1 
5 
4 
3 
1 
5 
3 


482 

156 

7991 

443 

450 

160 

748 

4851 


2 
3 


406 
464) 


Glackmeyer .. 
Kennedy 


6 


853) 


Lamarche 

Leitch 


2 


324) 


Newmarket. ,. 






Pyne 






Shackle ton 






3 

1 
8 
6 
4 


389 

80 
618 
897 
560 


Bavley 


J0S.W00II1TICS P.nfflpViarf 






Catharine. 










Chamberlain 






Dack 






Davidson 






Eby 






1 
6 


37 
958 


Evanturel 


321J 


2 






Gross 






Ingram 






2 

2 

1 


3i9 

310J 

161J 


4 
2 


631 
320 


Marter 

Marquis 


480 

7881 

1611 


3 

5 

1 


Otto 






Pacaud 


4 
2 
2 


6381 

332 

314) 


6 


240 


Pense 


384 

16U 
322 


3 

1 
2 


Robillard 

Savard 


4 
2 
2 


> 610 
320 

266 


Sharpe . . 






Truax 


159.J 

160.J 
160 
1.121 
160 
319 


1 

2 

1 
7 
1 
2 


1 


1535 


Armstrong 


Temiskaming J. W. B"l*"^'* ^<>w T.ia_ 


7 


1,069 


Auld '. 




• " keard 

• « 

< t< 

• t< 

• <• 

ff organ, Elk Lake 






Beauchamp. ,. 

Brethour 

Bryce 

Bucke 




1 


5 
1 
3 


808) 
158) 
478 


6 
5 
1 
6 
4 
6 
4 
7 
9 
5 
4 
6 
4 
9 


965) 

840 

160 

715 

483 

749 

484 

554 


Cane 


582 
73 


4 
2 


4 


643 


Casey 


Dymond 






Firstbrook .... 


333 
160 


3 

1 






Harley 


'.'. 






Harris 






980 


Henwood ..... 
Hilliard 


64U 

157 

400) 


4 

1 
8 


4 


642 


625) 
991) 


Hudson 

Kerns 


,, 


< 


3 


450 


957 
560) 


Lundy 










1,380) 


Tudhope 

Smyli ... .,,. 


i 
Temiskaming. Mark H 


158i 
4411 


1 
3 


2 


318) 


'"e 

1 


*57?) 
391 



46 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. H. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


to 

^ o 
d «= 
i5 


1^" 

Pi 3) 

6 o 


ce;=1 

o « 


No. of acres 
resumed. 


42 
a 
-S . 

<^-, P 

o w 
. tn 

o— ' 

2; 


No. of acres 
patented. 


Lorrain 


Temiskaming 
Temiskamine. 


Neil J. McAulay, Hailey- 

bury 

F. E. Ginn, Matheson . . 

T. V. Anderson, Hearst. 
" " 

J. A. Oliver, Port Arthur 

T.Dean,SaultSte.Marie 

C. J. Hollands, Port 

Frances 
Thos. Dodds, Thessalon. 

■1 « 

<< 11 

<> i< 

T.F. O'Flaherty, Kenora 
R. W. Teasdale, Massey 

■I « 


319 

130 
1,1091 
314 
312 
161 
430 
320- 
3211 
719J 
159 
2,189J 
161 
321 
597 
1,087 J 
389 
331 
302 
160 

3,238 
600 
2,691 
2, 7211 
1.454 

598 

266J 

320 

171 


2 

1 
7 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
5 
1 

15 
1 
2 

4 
7 
3 
2 
2 
1 

22 

4 
20 
21 
10 

4 
2 
2 

1 






4 

4 
6 


430 


Beatty 






650 


Benoit 

Bond 




. 


4 


649J 


355 


Bowman 






3 


495 


Calvert 


4 


636 




Carr 


6 


790 


Clergue 








Currie 


4 
4 
1 
9 


645 

623 

159 

1,370 






Dundonald .... 






Evelyn 






German 






Hislop 






Matheson 

Mountjoy 


2 
4 
3 


3l3i 
6411 
481 


1 


151 


McCart 

Playfair 


1 
3 


158J 
539 


Stock 


2 
1 


3281 
151 




Taylor 

Walker 


4 


64U 


Casgrain 

Eilber 


Algoma 

Thunder Bay. 

Algoma 

Rainy River.. 
Algoma 


15 


2,240 


3 


414 


Hanlan 

Kendall 

Lowther 


4 
5 


574 
.750 


"■9 


"i!i55 


Forbes 

Lyon 


5 


682 


1 
2 
6 


7 
267 


Nepigon 

Aweres 


1 
1 


I37i 
173 


919 


Tarentorus . . . 






Vankoughnet. . 


310 


2 










Watten 






1 
2 


79i 


Bright 






2 
3 


320 
644 


303 


Bright Ad ... . 
Day 




• 
















Gladstone .... 














Gould 


476 


3 






2 


184^ 


Haughton 








Johnson 


240 


2 






5 


720 


Kirkwood 








Parkinson . . . 




























Rose 










1 


154 


Striker 












Thompson .... 






10 


1.504 


2 


298 


Wells 


i52 

. 186J 

447 
164J 
288 
156 


1 

3 

3 
2 

2 

1 




Drayton 


Kenora 

Sudbury 


.... 




2 


41i 


Hallam 








Harrow 






2 
1 


300^ 


May 






135 


Salter 



















192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



47 



Appendix No. 14- — Continued. 



i 

Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 




1^ 
d « 


CO 4) 

= 1 

d o 


No. of acres 
resumed. 


a 

«4-l C3 

o w 
. cr 


No. of acres 
patented. 


Shedden 


Sudbury 

Sudbury 

Nipissing 

Nipissing 

Nipissing ,. .. 

Sudbury 

Renfrew 

Leeds 

Lennox 

Grey 

Bruce 

PrinceEdward 
Frontenac . . . 

rrfj,nark 


R. W. Teasdale, Massey 

J. K. MacLennan, Sud- 
bury 
J. A. Philion, Sturgeon 
" Falls 

John Brown, Markstay. 

W. J. Parsons, North Bay 

Edward Arthurs, 

Espanola 
Unattached 


30 
145 

160 

mh 

3l3i 
7641 
1,052 


1 
1 

1 

3 










Victoria 






1 
1 


160 


Dowling 






460i 


Scollard 






Mason 


2 
5 
9 






3 
2 
9 


480 


Hugel 


1 




320 


Widdifield .... 
Nairn 


1 
2 

1 


3191 


1,276 


Aduiaston .... 


! 100 
285 
163 
100 
100 


1 
3 
2 
1 
1 


1 




5 
2 
1 
1 


600 


Bagot 




1 


100 


200 


Blithfleld 


•1 


2 


Bromley 


<> 






100 


Horton 


« 








McNabb 


<> 






1 
1 

1 


80 


Westmeath. . . 


.< 


233 


9 






153 


Elizabethtown . 


Unattached 








49| 


Effingham .... 


Unattached 










Kaladar 
















Sheffield 


.. 


200 


2 










Artemesia . . . . 


Unattached 






■ 

1 


50 


Bentinck 












200 


Derby 


<< 










50 


Egremont .... 


•< 










351 


Glenelg 


<• 










100 


Holland 


<• 










317J 
150 


Normanby. ... 


•1 


50 


1 






Osprey 


>• 








Proton 


•• 










1 
3 

1 


149i 
250 


Sullivan 


•1 










Arran 


Unattached 










99 


Brant 














Bruce 


<< 










1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


955 


Elderslie 


• < 










49J 
50 


Huron 


•• 










Kincardine . . . 


« 










72 


Ameliasburgh . 


Unattached 


100 


1 






99 


Barrie 


Unattached 






154 


Olden 














Hinchinbrooke. 


•i 


200 


1 










Kennebec 


•• 






3 
5 


600 


Oso 


« 


199 


1 






936 


Beckwith 


Unattached 








Dalhousie ' 




100 


1 






1 


100 


Darling ; 


•• 








Pakenham .... 


•• 










2 
1 


400 


Lanark 


•' 










100 


Sherbrjoke.N , 





290 


1 


• • • • 


1 


2 


498 



48 



KEPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Appendix No. 14. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


CO 

2 




CO lU 

g 


U B 


en 
^ . 

tn 
. tc 


to . 

d a 


Melancthon . . . 


Dufferin 

Essex 

Norfolk 

Northumber- 
land 
Ontario 

Victoria 

Grenville .... 
Peterborough. 

Halton 

Hastings 

Lennox and 
Addington 

Stormont.... 

Simcoe 

Wellington... 
Wentworth .. 
Temiskaming. 
Sudbury 


Unattached 










1 
1 


100 


Gosfleld, S. . . . 


Unattached 


86 


1 






86 


Sandwich, E. . 










Haughton 


Unattached 














Percy 


Unattached 










1 
1 
1 

3 


49i 


Rama 


Unattached 


100 


1 






100 


Garden 


Unattached 






164 


Dal ton 












251 


Laxton 


« 












Somerville .... 


•< 


332 


3 






2 


209 


Edwardsburgh 


Unattached 








Belmont 


Unattached 










1 
2 
2 


100 


Dummer 




266 
268 


2 
2 






200 


Harvey 


'• 






185 


Smith 


« 








Nassagaweya . 


Unattached 










1 


100 


Elzevir 


Unattached 










Grimsthorpe . . 
















Hungerford . . . 


<< 


103 
358 
100 

100 


1 
3 
1 

1 






1 
4 
1 

1 

1 


100 


Tudor 


•> 






408 


Thurlow 


X 






100 


Ashby 


Unattached 






100 


Denbigh 








257 


Sheffield 


'< 


100 


1 








Cornwall 


Unattached 










KoXborough . . . 




336 

200 

35 
11 


4 
1 

3 

1 






3 


291 


Gwillimbury, 


Unattached 








W. 
Matchedash . . . 









5 


45 


Tiny 


« 








Arthur 


Unattached 










Luther West . . 












1 


lOOi 


Barton 


Unattached .... .... 












Saltfleet 




i 

160 


2 

1 










Cody 












Maisonville . 


„ 







20 


661 


Bigwood 


Unattached 












Burwash 




. 1601 


1 










Creighton 


i< 






10 
2 

1 
2 


600 


Dennison 


<• 










ink 


Drury 


•< 


319 
319 


2 
2 






160 


Dryden 


<< 






320 


Falconbridge . 


.. 








Foleyet 





406^ 


1 






. . . . 





192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



49 



Appendix No. 14. — Continued. 



Township. 


District 

or 
County 


Agent. 


CO 
CO 

1 


1" 


CO ^ 

=1 
I8 


No. of acres 
resumed. 


CO 

-1.3 

fl 

0) 

t^ « 

0.2 


(0 


Lome 


Sudbury 

NipissiBg 

Kenora 

Thunder Bay. 
Sudbury 

Algoma 

Thunder Bay. 

Kenora 

<• 
■1 

<■ 
Algoma 

Sudbury .... 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Wellington. .. 


Unattached 


4 
245 


1 
2 










Louise 








6 


1 341 


McKinnon 


•< 








MacLennan . . . 


<• 














Shakespeare 


<• 


161 


1 






1 


159J 


Snider 


•< 






Waters 


•• 


347 

258 
866 


2 

1 
6 






1 
3 


177 


Badgerow .... 


Unattached 


3 


462 


473 


Crerar 






Delamere 


<• 










Falconer 


•• 


9 
414 


1 
3 










Field 


« 






1 


468J 


Gibbons 


<< 






Jaff ray 


Unattached 










1 
2 


40 


Malachi 












27 


Umbach 


« 












McTavish 


Unattached 














Lough rin 


Unattached 


311i 
178^ 

160 

n 


2 

1 

1 

1 










McKim ....... 












Long 


Unattached 






1 


160 


O'Brien 










Townsites— 
Armstrong. . . . 


Unattached 










Grant 






2 

5 










MacFarlane . . . 


,, 










Dryden 


» 






1 


IJ 


Sioux Look- 
out 


,, 










Waldhof 


<i 


i 

5 


2 

1 

23 
6 

12 

2 










Winnipeg 
River 
Crossioi . . . 








1 


li 


Hearst 


T. V. Anderson, Hearst. 
W. E. Whybourne, 

Marksville 
Unattached 






Hilton 






6 


H 


Capreol 






F rederickhouse 


Unattached 










Iroquois Falls. 










Kirkland Lake 


•1 


i 
I 


3 

1 
1 










I-arder Lake . . 


« 










Smyth 


•> 








k 


Gowganda .. .. 


4< 


40 


12 




Petewawa. . .. 


Unattached 






1 
1 
2 


11 


Penetangui- 


Unattached 










shene 
Alma 


Unattached 










31 



50 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. H. — Concluded. 



Cities and 
Towns. 



District 

or 
County. 



Agent. 









U3 












CO . 


CA 


C3 


ft ^. 


o § 


O S 


O S 
. CO 
o <» 


"-f^ 


o S? 


d g 


:z; ^ 


IZi "^ 


^^ 


^•^ 



o J 



Ford City 

Fort William.. 

Port Arthur. . . 

Missanabie . . . 

City of Toronto 

Ashbridge's . . . 
Bay 



p]ssex 

ThuQder Bay. 



Algoma . 
York... 



WATER LOT 
Unattached 



12 



6^ 







1 
1 


1 






















2 


% 







-A 49 


Algoma 

St. Joseph 

Channel . . . 
St. Joseph 

Channel . . . 
St. .Joseph 

Channel . . . 
St. Joseph 

Channel . . . 
St. Joseph 

Channel . . . 
St. Joseph 

Channel . . . 

Nipissing . ... 

Lanark 

Froatexiac. . . . 

Leeds 

rear of Leeds 
an 1 Lans- 
downe 

Lansdowne. . . 


ISLAND 
Unattached 


S. 

2 
1 

91 

10 

25 

11 

145 

2A 
5.2 

2i». 

\ 

4i 

5i 

1 


2 










27 








1 


1 * * ' ,' 




1 


Parcel Islands 
. J. D. 54 


,j 








Island 17, Bed- 
ford Island.. 


jj 










Part Cedar Is- 
land 


,, 










N E w>t. J D 


^^ 










Island 










C. R. 1 Island. 


„ 










Louden— 
Crow Lake 
Island .... 








1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


2t\ 


Abitibi Lake 
Island .... 


,, 






5.2 


Burgess N — 
Arrow Is'd . . 


,, 


2A 


Bedford— 
Pt. Whiteflsh 
Island 








tVo 
4} 


Bedford— 
Pt. Whiteflsh 
Island .... 








Crosby N. Is'd 


<> 






Covey's Islani 


• 






Union Island.. 


.. 






1 
2 


51 


Ashby — 
Weslemkoon 
Lake Is'd. 








1 






Total 










• 57,032/- 


491 


208 


25, 725 J 


425 


47.977 J^o 



Number of lots assigned 375 

W. R. LEDGER, Sales Clerk. 
W. C. CAIN. Chief Clerk. 



Number of acres assigned 53,609 

ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS. 51 

Appendix No. 15. 

Eeport on Crown Land Surveys. 

Sir, — Acting under instructions given during the past year twenty Ontario 
Land Surveyors with accompanying parties were engaged on field-work throughout 
the northern part of the Province. The extent and nature of these surveys may 
be briefly described as follows: 

Exploratory Work. 

A meridian Tine extending north from the westerly end of Lac Seul for one 
hundred miles into the District of Patricia and a base line forty miles west there- 
from were surveyed by K. G. Eoss, O.L.S. Similar work to the same extent 
north of Lake St. Joseph was performed by J. S. Dobie, O.L.S., last year. The 
reports and returns of this work may be considered to give in a general way the 
character of the country in the District of Patricia south of latitude fifty-two 
degrees north. 

The western limit of the Nipigon Forest Reserve in the District of Thunder 
Bay was established on the ground by Phillips & Benner, O.L.S., and this meridian 
was extended north to White Water Lake on tlie Ogoki River waters. Latitude 
fifty degress forty-five minutes north, longitude eighty-nine degrees ten minutes 
west. This vast forest reserve comprising seven thousand square miles surrounding 
Lake Nipigon has now been defined on the ground with the exception of the north 
limit and this will enable the Department to deal with timber and mining lands 
in that district and the lines will form a base from which other exploratory work 
can be carried on. 

Township Boundaries, Nine Mile System. 

Outlines of twelve, nine mile townships in the Districts of Timiskaming and 
Algoma on the Ground Hog and Kapuskasing River watersheds were surveyed 
by Sutcliffe & Neelands, O.L.S., and N. B. MacRostie, O.L.S. This work com- 
pletes the blocking of the territory lying between the two lines of the Canadian 
National Railway in the District of Timiskaming. The reports on this work 
indicate a large area of good clay land but requiring extensive drainage to make 
suitable for agriculture. The territory covered is well timbered with spruce, poplar, 
birch and balsam. 

Township Boundaries, Six Mile System. 

A large unexplored area in the District of Sudbury lying north of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway between Ramsay and Dalton Stations was blocked out 
in six mile townships, this work being assigned to Ontario Land Surveyors H. J. 
Beatty, J. W. Fitzgerald, C. V, Gallagher, McAuslan & Anderson, Speight & 
Van Nostrand, and A. C. Young. This area is not suitable for agriculture and 
may be described as a boulder country with sand clay and muskeg, rough and 
hilly, timbered with second growth spruce, banksian pine, birch, balsam and poplar. 

Another area comprising six townships in the vicinity of White Lake and 
Shabotik River north of the Canadian Pacific Railway and immediately west of 
the district line between Thunder Bay and Algoma. was blocked out by M, E. 
Crouch. O.L.S. This area is well timbered with banksian pine and is unsuitable 
for agriculture. 



52 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Lake and Eiver Teaverse Surveys. 

The work was continued this year by C. E. Kenny, O.L.S., on the Missinaibi 
Lake and Eiver; T. G. Code, O.L.S., on the Ground Hog Eiver and headwater lakes; 
Bingham & Kirkup, O.L.S., on the Nagagami Lake and Eiver and Pagwachuan 
Eiver in the District of Algoma; T. J. Patten, O.L.S., on Lake Penage and 
Whitefish Eiver; J. S. Dobie, O.L.S., on Lake St. Joseph, Island Lake and 
Kashaweogama Lake. 

The report of the geologist with Ontario Land Surveyor Dobie's party last 
year indicated the possibility of iron ore deposits in territory adjacent to Kashaweo- 
gama Lake and Lake St. Joseph and it seemed advisable that a more detailed 
survey should be made in this area. 

The beautiful expanse of Lake Penage and islands therein, its accessibility to 
steamboat and railroad traffic, though sufficiently removed for quiet, makes this 
district very attractive as a summer resort proposition. 

The larger rivers flowing north to James Bay are being accurately mapped 
and the water power and timber prospects reported on and filed for future reference. 

Miscellaneous Surveys. 

Timber lines as required were surveyed by Lincoln Mooney, O.L.S. These 
consisted of work in the Township of Noble, in the District of Sudbury, Township 
D in the District of Algoma and Timber Berth E in the District of Nipissing. 
Wherever practicable these lines were marked permanently and will be used in 
further subdivisions of the townships when required. 

TOWNSITE. 

The survey of a small townsite at Gogama in the ToAvnship of Noble, District 
of Sudbury, was assigned to Lincoln Mooney, O.L.S. This subdivision adjoining 
the Canadian National Eailway line was required to take care of the locating 
and housing of the population in that lumber manufacturing area. . 

Instructions were issued to G. F. Summers, O.L.S,, to survey a townsite at 
Kapuskasing on the Canadian National Eailway, Township of O'Brien, District 
of Timiskaming. Owing to the location of the Spruce Falls Pulp Company's plant 
the townsite survey has been delayed but a definite location for the town has 
now been decided upon and work is progressing upon the subdivision. 

W. H. Fairchild, O.L.S., was directed to mark certain boundaries of CrOwn 
lands and lay out park lots on the Lake Erie front at Long Point, Township of 
Walsingham. The method of dealing with this area and manner in which it 
should be controlled may now be intelligently considered. 

E. T. Ireson, O.L.S., was instructed to proceed with the Canadian Aero 
Film Company's seaplane to James Bay and to cruise the territory south and 
west thereof and report as fully as possible from observation the character of 
the country covered. The conditions under which these instructions were carried 
out and the difficulties met with are fully described in his report herewith. (See 
Appendix 40.) 

The stone monument planted to mark the interprovincial boundary at Port 
Fortune on the bank of the Ottawa Eiver was found to be out of place and 
arrangements were made with the Department of Lands and Forests, Quebec, to 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND EOKESTS. 53 

have this monument replaced. In accordance therewith J. Hutcheon, O.L.S., 
Inspector of Surveys for Ontario, and D. W. Mills, O.L.S., Inspector of Surveys 
for Quebec, proceeded to that point and had the monument repaired and replaced 
in its original position and otherwise referenced to preserve this point on the 
boundary permanently. The joint report on this matter is not yet completed 
but will appear next year. 

C. E. Pitton, O.L.S., was engaged as Inspector of the field work of the several 
outline parties and as far as possible examined a part of the work in charge of 
each surveyor. His reports show that in most cases the work was satisfactorily 
performed and well up to the standard set in the instructions. 

The plans, field notes and accounts when forwarded to the Department were 
duly examined and checked by the Inspector of Surveys. 

A standard iron post similar to that used on Dominion land survey work 
has been adopted and was used at three mile points on all base and meridian 
and outline surveys made this year. The post consists of one inch iron pipe thirty 
inches long filled with cement with foot plate of pressed steel three and one-half 
inches in diameter and cap of bronze three inches in diameter. A hole is dug 
and the post is sunk so that the cap is flush with the surface. The ground is 
properly tamped around the post to make the position firm. The cap bears the 
inscription in the form of a circle " Ontario Crown Land Surveys," also " Seven 
years imprisonment for removal." In the centre of the circle is marked the mile- 
age from township corners or from the initial point of starting in case of meridian 
and base lines. The posts are referenced to mounds, pits and bearing trees. 
This method of marking boundaries will tend to create a permanency not here- 
tofore acquired. The same post is also being used to mark boundaries established 
by Municipal Surveys under the authority as set out in sections 15, 16, and 17 
of the Survey Act. The inscription on the cap of the post being " Ontario 
Municipal Surveys." 

The detailed reports of the several surveys performed which have been filed 
during the year will be found in Appendices 15 to 40, inclusive.. 

L. V. EORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 
Toronto, October 31st, 1920. 



54 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 15-a. 

Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1920. • 













Date when con- 
firmed under 




Name of 




Date of 




R. S. 0. 1914, 


o 


Surveyor. 


No. 


Instructions. 


Description of Survey. 


Chapter 166, 


^ 










Sees. 10-15, In- 
clusive. 


1 


C- A. Jones . 


709 i Nov. 2, 1916. 


To survey the boundary line be- 
tween the Townships of Green- 












ock and Culross, in the 












County of Bruce, and to plant 












stone or other durable monu- 












nients to mark the said boun-j 










dary ! July 24, 1920. 


2 


Oliver Smith 


712 


July 24, 1917. 


To survey the concession line^ 
between concessions 9 and 10, 
opposite lot 17, Township ofl 
Cartwright Mar. 23, 1918. 


3 


Roger M. Lee 


719 


Oct. 22, 1918. 


To survey the original road al- 










lowance between lots 13 and 












14, in the first concession of the 












said Township of Wainfleet, in 












the County of Welland, andj 










that stone or other monuments 












be planted to mark the position 












of said road allowance at the 












intersection with the road al- 












lowance between the 1st and 












2nd concessions, and at differ- 












ent points to the lake shore.. 


Jan. 12, 1920. 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



55 



Appendix No. 16. 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during the twelve 
months ending October 31st, 1920. 



sz; 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions. 



1 Jas. J. McKay. I 723 



2 Edward J. 

Rainboth . . 



3 Alexander 
Baird . . 



724. 



725 



April 9, 1920. 



Aug. 17, 1920 



Aug. 17, 1920, 



Description of Survey. 



To survey the original road allowance between 
the 2nd and 3rd concessions of the Township 
of Beverly, extending from the westerly side 
of lot No. 31 to the easterly side of lot No. 
36, and to plant stone or other duraJble monu- 
ments to mark the said road allowance. 

To survey the concession road allowance be- 
tween the 4th and 5th concessions, Ottawa 
tront, lying ibetween the westerly side of the 
side road between lots 5 and 6 and the 
easterly side of the side road between lots 
15 and 16 on said concession road allowance, 
in the Township of Gloucester, and that 
stone or other durable monuments be placed 
to mark the boundary of the said road 
allowance. 

To survey the side road known as the twen- 
tieth side line and also of the side road al- 
lowance ibetween lots 25 and 26, from con- 
cessions 6 to 8, in the Township of North 
Easthope. 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



56 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 17. 
Statement of Surveys in progress during the twelve montlis ending October 31st, 1920. 



Date of 
Instructions. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



Description of iSoirvey. 



Amount 
Paid 



June 

May 
May 

May 

May 

Feb. 

May 

Jan. 
May 
May 
May 

May 

May 

May 

May 
May 



30, 


1919. 


12, 


1920. 


5, 


1920. 


*, 


1920. 


12, 


1920. 


28, 


19^0. 


15, 


1920. 


14, 


1920. 


21. 


1920. 


11, 


1920. 


4. 


1920. 


17. 


1920. 


12, 


1920. 


11, 


1920. 


18, 


1920. 


4, 


1920. 



A. L. Russell. 



H. J. Beatty. . 

Bingham & 
Kirkup . . . . 

T. G. Code . . . 
M. E. Crouch 
J. S. Dobie... 



J. S. Dobie 



W. H. Fairchild. 



J. W. Fitzgerald. 



C. V. Gallagher. 



C. R. Kenny 



K. G. Ross. 



N. B,. MacRostie. 

McAuslan & 
Anderson . . . 



Phillips & 
Bender 



T. J. Patten 



To traverse the shores of Upper 
Shebandowan and Green Water 
Lakes, District of Thunder Bay. 

To survey certain township out- 
lines. District of Sudbury 

To traverse certain lakes and 
rivers, District of Algoma .... 



To continue traverse certain! 
lakes and rivers, Districts of! 
Sudbury and Timiskaming 

To survey certain township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of Thunder Bay 



To survey Kashaweogama Lake and| 
Island Lake, District of Thun- 
der Bay 



To traverse the shores of Lake St. 
Joseph and run certain base and 
meridian lines in the District of 
Patricia 



To survey Sand Beach into park 
lots between Long Point and 
Walsingham 



To survey certain township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of Sudbury 

To survey certain township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of Sudbury 



To continue traverse of Missinaibi 
Lake and River, Districts of 
Algoma and Sudbury 



To survey a meridian and ibase 
lines in the District of Patricia. . 

To survey certain township out- 
lines. District of Timiskaming. . 

To survey certain Township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of (Sudbury 



To survey meridian line forming 
the "west boundary of the Nipi- 
gon Forest (Reserve, District of 

Thunder Bay ! 

I 

To traverse Lake Penage Islands! 
and other lakes and ooitlets in 
the District of Sudbury ! 



$ c. 
600 00 

5,650 00 

4.000 00 

4,125 GO 

5,150 00 

3,100 00 

7,190 00 

200 00 

5,700 00 

1,500 00 

4,000 00 

12.600 00 

4,500 00 

3.900 00 

6,800 00 
1,700 00 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OE LANDS AND EOEESTS. 



57 



Appendix No. 17. 
Statement of Surveys in progress during the twelve months ending October 31st, 1920. 



i 


Date of Name of 
Instructions. Surveyor. 


1 
Description of Survey. 


Amount 
Paid. 


17 


May 
Aug. 
May 

May 
May 


21, 1920. 
24, 1920. 

27, 1920. 

12, 1920. 
14, 1920. 


'Speight & 
Van Nostrand 

Sutcliffe & 
Neelands .... 

G. F. Summers. 

A. C. Young . . . 
C. E. Fitton.... 


To survey certain township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of Sudbury 


.$ c. 
5,900 00 


18 
19 


To traverse part of the Montreal 
River, District of Tlmiskaming. . 

To survey a town plot and other 
lands in the vicinity of Kapuska- 
sing, Township of O'Brien, Dis- 
trict of Timiskaming 


400 00 
500 00 


20 
21 


To survey certain township out- 
lines north of C. P. Railway, 
District of Sudbury 

Inspection of surveys for 1920 


5,550 00 
2,600 00 




85,765 00 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 
Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



58 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Appendiv No. 18. 

Statement of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1920. 



Date of 
Instructions. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



Description of Survey. 



Amount 
Paid 



May 

July 



16, 1919. S. R. Bingham. 
8, 1919.: 



April 30, 1919. David Beatty .. 



3 jApril 15, 1919. H. J. Beatty. 



10 
11 

12 

13 
14 
15 

16 



April 
May 



15, 1919. A. S. Code. 



2, 1919. 



G. Code. 



May 8, 1919. 



April 22, 1919. 



April 15, 1919. 



April 15, 1919. 



April 
May 

May 

May 
Aug. 
April 

May 



25, 
9, 



1919. 
1919. 



^. B. Code. 



avana & 
Watson 



8, 1919. 



_ 1, 
6, 

15," 

r r .1 
1, 



1919. 
1919, 

1919. 

" -> 

■ I . .fi 

1919. 



J. S. Dobie . . . 
J. W.Fitzgerald. 

C. E. Fitton... 
3. J. Gillon 

C. R. Kenny... 

Lang & Ross. . . 
T. L. Morris . . . 



McAuslan & 
Anderson . 



V. B. MaoRostie. 



Subdivision of part of the.Township 
of Devon and Hartington, and 
survey of base and meridian 
lines. District of Thunder Bay. . 

Traverse certain lakes in the Timi- 
gami Forest Reserve, Districts of 
Nipissing and Sudbury 

Survey certain township outlines 
north of Lake Abitibi, District 
of Timiskaming 

Survey certain township outlines in 
the District of Algoma 

Traverse certain lakes and rivers 
in the Districts of Sudbury and 
Algoma 

Traverse the shores and islands of 
Charleston Lake and Red Horse 
Lake, Townships of Lansdowne| 
and Escott, County of Leeds \ 

Survey certain township outlines, [ 

District of Sudbury | 

i 

Survey a meridian line between 
the Districts of Thunder Bay 
and Kenora, and in the District 
cf Patricia 

Survey a meridian line in the vi-! 
cinity of the Ground Hog River: 
and subdivision of the residue of j 
the Township of Nansen, Dis- 
trict of Timiskaming 

To inspect Crown Surveys 



Survey a part of the (boundary line 
between the Districts of Rainy 
River and Kenora, and certain 
meridian lines in Rainy River . . \ 

Traverse Missinaibi Lake and[ 
River and tributary waters. Dis- 
tricts of Algoma and Sudbury . . 

Survey certain township outlines, 
District of Algoma 



To re-establish part of the boun- 
dary of the Algonquin Provincial 
Park, District of Nipissing j 

Survey certain township lines, Dis- 
trict of Algoma j 

Surrey certain township outlines; 
on the Kapuskasing River, Ds ' 
t riot of Algoma 



3,719 35 

2,865 60 

2,491 91 
1,883 34 

2,650 00 

2,245 00 
1,388 19 

5.286 00 

2,127 71 

816 72 

2,121 85 

2,320 48 
2,561 68 

3,994 94 
2,378 47 

1 .6( 3 71 



192021 



DEPARTiMENT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS. 



59 



Appendix No. 18. 

Statement of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1920. 



Date of 
•§, Instructions. 



Name of 
Surveyor. 



Description of Survey. 



Amount 
paid. 



17 Sept. 30, 1919. 

April 15, 1919. 

July 22, 1919. 

April 15, 1919. 



Aug. 18 and 
Sept. 9, 1920. 



Phillips & 
Benner . 



Phillips & 
Benner 



G. Jj. Ramsey. 
W. A. Sibbett., 



L. Mooney.... 
Jan, 27, 1920. f-'- Mooney .. 

June 9, 1920 . : ^■'- Mooney 



Mar. 22, 1920. L.. Mooney 
May 12, 1920 



Aug. 10, 1920. 



Sutcliffe & 
Neelands . . . 



J. J. Newman. 



July 24, 1917. Oliver Smith . 



Sept. 15, 1919, 



M. E. Crouch . 



Survey a meridian line and tra 
verse that portion of Dog Lake 
lying north of the Township of 
Fowler, District of Thunder Bay. 

To subdivide the Township of 
Fowler, District of Thunder Bay 

Traverse Long Lake, District of 
Thunder Bay 



Subdivide the residue of the Town- 
ships of Oasgrain and Hanlan, 
District of Algoma 



Survey of G-ogama town site, Dii 
trict of Sudbury 



Survey of location L. M. 12, Town- 
ship of Noble, District of Sud- 
bury 



Survey of timber line in Township 
2 D, Mississaga Forest Reserve, 
District of Algoma 



Survey of Timber Berth E, District 
of Nipissing 



Survey of certain outlines on 
Ground Hog ^iver, District of 
Timiskaming 



Assisting Inspector of Surveys in 
survey of Point Felee sand and 
gravel areas 



Survey of the concession line be- 
tween concessions 9 and 10. oppo 
site lot 17, in Township of Cart 
Wright 



Expenses on the survey of the out- 
lines of the Pic River pulp and 
timber limit 



Architectural Bronze & Iron Works, 
Toronto, of Canadian AUis-Chal- 
mers, Ltd.: 

C. L. Iron Posts 

do Iron Posts 

Municipal Iron Posts 



July 16, 1920. 



R. T. Ireson... 



To accompany Canadian Aero Film 
Company on an aerial expedition 
to James' Bay 



$ c. 

3,259 76 
3,220 18 
1,889 95 

1.934 30 
626 30 

74 30 

816 39 
213 30 

8,136 54 

66 75 

24 00 
150 45 



2,692 80 
816 00 
560 00 



64,935 97 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



ALBERT GRIGG, 

Deputy Minister Lands and Forests. 



60 KEPOET OF THE Xo. a 



Appendix No. 19. 

SUEVEY OF PaetS OF THE TOWNSHIPS OF DeVON AND HaETINGTON, DiSTEICT OF 

Thundee Bay. 

FoET William, February 25th, 1920. 

SiE, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
Devon Township in the District of Thunder Bay, carried out under instructions 
dated the 16th day of May, 1919. 

On receipt of your instructions I engaged Mr. E, S. Kirkup, O.L.S., who 
served his time with me before going overseas, to assist in the work. After 
receiving notification of the preparation of the instructions, I received locally a 
representation favouring the employment of returned soldiers. My party as 
originally made up contained considerably more than half soldiers; unfortunately^ 
many were not able to stand the bush life since their return from overseas :, 
however, while I was not able to maintain as high an average of returned nieii 
on this party, some were always employed and as vacancies occurred the official 
in charge of that section of the employment bureau dealing with returned men; 
always received the first requests for men. 

Having completed the organization of the party I moved supplies and outfit 
by means of lorries to within three miles of the International Boundary. From 
this point outfits and canoes were packed in over the South Fowl Lake trail to 
Hospital Bridge on the Arrow Eiver from which points the river was used as 
far as low water and rapids would permit. 

Commencing at the intersection of the interior lines of the township, run 
last year, I ran east, following out the instructions, and struck good country all 
the way to the west boundary of Pardee Township. The depth of concessions 
three and four north of the blind line, I cut down to fifty chains depth east of 
the eighteenth sideline on account of the rocky nature of the country to the 
north, as shown in last year's report. I also found it advisable to limit the 
depth of concession one to sixty chains from the twelfth sideline east. The 
remaining concessions of the township are all eighty chains in depth with the 
exception of that part of concession four which fronts the west boundary, which 
is sixty chains in depth. 

Following the completion of the survey of Devon Township, the survey of 
the part of Hartington Township covered by the same instructions was carried 
out. The fronts of lots one to twenty-four and the south-west and north-west 
corners respectively of lots one and twenty-four were properly posted, and referred 
to bearing trees, and the sixth, twelfth and eighteenth sidelines were duly 
established. 

Separate plan and field notes of this part of the township have been prepared 
in accordance with my instructions. 

In accordance with your instructions I laid out in the south-east portion 
of the Township of Devon a road diverging from a point in the twelfth sideline 
and running thence easterly until the sixth sideline was struck, as shown on the 
accompanying plan. On the sixth sideline access can be had to the east boundary 
of the township by way of the road allowance between concessions three and four. 

The road allowance along the east boundary suggested in the instructions was 
not very practicable owing to the broken nature of the country, including one 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 61 

very rough hill three hundred feet high, which crosses the boundary just north 
of the blind line between concessions two and three. 

The chainmen were well posted in their work before starting out, and remained 
^cith me throughout the survey. 

The lines will be found to be well opened up and blazed, with substantial 
well-marked posts planted, and bearing trees well chosen and marked where they 
were available. A number of the lines ran through brule and on these we were 
only able to blaze old dry stumps and fallen trees. However, we planted pickets 
at frequent intervals, firmly in the ground, so there should be no difficulty in 
picking up the line. 

All points required by the instructions were marked with iron posts. The 
traverse work was left to the end of the work and a set back was experienced in 
tliat both transits were damaged in the rapids, and it was necessary to secure 
another transit from the city. 

Observations for Azimuth and Time were taken from time to time during 
the survey, as weather conditions permitted. 

Soil. 

The township as laid out gives to each lot a share in the good arable land 
which lies throughout the valley of the Arrow River. The timber in a good 
many cases has been burnt off and in some the fire has been through a number 
of times, making the clearing of considerable areas comparatively easy. The land 
in the south-east corner of the township is broken by a large rocky range of hills, 
the land on either side, however, being of an agricultural nature. 

The agricultural land referred to consists mostly of clay, white to light 
brown in colour, and clay loam, with some sandy loam scattered throughout the 
township mostly towards the east end. Along the Tote Road to South Fowl 
Lake the brush is cleared out and hay is growing freely. In concession three, 
lot twelve, the Pigeon River Lumber Company have a cultivated clearing of about 
thirty-five acres, on which they grow crops of some nature each year, and I 
believe the results are gratifying. 

Minerals. 

The rock throughout the greater part of the township is granite, while there 
is considerable showing of low grade iron, along the Arrow River towards the 
west end of the township and in the range in the south-east end of the township. 

Timber. 

The whole township has been lumbered over at a comparatively recent date 
aud if there was any good timber left it has long since been ravaged by the bush 
fires which have raged through that country from time to time. There is an area 
of small spruce on lots six to nine inclusive, just south of the Arrow River, and on 
lots thirty-three to thirty-six in the vicinity of the blind line, which would make 
good pulpwood in a few years. 

The country is covered principally with small birch, poplar and banksian pine. 



63 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Game. 

Beaver are the principal occupants of the region, in fact, tliere was hardly 
a line south of the Arrow River that did not cross a dam at some point or other. 
There are beaver houses in many places along the Arrow River. Moose and 
bear were plentiful. Some red deer were seen. 

There are two main trails through the township, the South Fowl Lake trail, 
crossing the Arrow River on what is known as the Hospital Bridge in lot six, 
concession three, and the Silver Mountain trail, which in a general way follows 
the Arrow River on the north side to the north-west corner of the township, and 
thence to Silver Mountain; this trail is. blocked considerably, west of the logging 
dam, by windfalls. There are many old lumber trails leading into these main 
arteries which would help the settler to open up his farm. 

There is a well constructed logging dam across the Arrow River on lot 
sixteen, concession three, which holds the water back for several miles. 

The Arrow River drops about forty feet at Mary Falls in lot four, con- 
cession two, but at the time of the survey the dam was holding back the water 
so that at the falls the water was only twelve feet wide by a foot and a half deep. 

I beg to forward herewith field notes of survey, plans of townships, plan 
showing field notes of traverses of Arrow River and of the road laid out across 
lots seven to twelve, Devon Township, 

I trust that everything will be found satisfactory. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) E. R. BiXGiiAM, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 20, 
Survey of Township Base and Meridian Lines, District of Thunder Bay. 

Fort William, February 28th, 1920. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
Base and Meridian Lines in the District of Thunder Bay, carried out under your 
instructions dated 8th of July, 1919, being an extension of my instructions for 
the survey of parts of the Townships of Devon and Hartington, dated 16th of 
May, 1919. 

My instructions called for the employment of two men as land cruisers and 
I was fortunate eventually in securing Kenneth Spence who prior to his service 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 63 

overseas had had years of experience on railway preliminary and location surveys, 
and similar work, as instrument man, etc. ; and Lionel Merritt who has been 
raised on a farm in this district and knew what was involved in the development 
of a bush farm. Together they were a splendid team. 

They were instructed in examining land to have in mind the point of view 
of a possible future settler, and to consider at all times the possibility of future 
development of the land with the prospect of success for the settler. 

Mr. E. S. Kirkup, O.L.S., assisted throughout the work, and the subsequent 
preparation of the returns. 

Our party and supplies were taken in by way of Nolalu on the P. D. & W. 
branch of the Canadian National Eailway, thence by team as far as road and 
trail held good, thence by packing to the north-west corner of Marks Township. 
After diligent search the stump of the old post was found where a logging road 
crossed the line marking the north boundary, the top of the post being found at 
the side of the road. This point of post was renewed according to instructions. 

An observation was then taken and the lines started west and north. 

While running the first base line westward, two men searched for three days 
to find a trail through the westerly part of Aldina. They then returned and 
advised that owing to the roughness of the country to be travelled the moVing of 
part of the outfit be made back to Nolalu and that the north-west corner of 
Strange Township be reached from Mile 47 on the P. D, & W. branch. 

Accordingly, the whole party and part of the outfit was moved round this 
way to the north-west corner of Strange Township, 

At this point I intersected the north and west limits of Strange Township 
as marked by blazed lines; at the point of intersection a post was found marked 
T.B.W. 2, T.B.W. 3, and W. 4. I planted our corner posts at this intersection. 

The survey was then proceeded with according to instructions, the first and 
second meridians being carried north from the north-west corners of Marks and 
Strange Townships respectively, the first base line being run west from the said 
corner of Marks as a chord of a parallel of latitude, and the second base line 
being run east and west as chords of a parallel of latitude from a point six miles 
north of the north-west corner of Marks Township; double chainage was used to 
establish the starting point of the second base line as also in other parts of the 
work. 

On the west limit of Conmee Township connection was made with a post 
of location E 710 on the south side of Thunder lake. The first meridian was 
run north to intersect the Dawson Eoad and connection made with one of the 
posts between lots seventy-eight and seventy-nine. The second meridian was run 
north to cut the main line of the Canadian National Eailway and connection 
made with the B.C. of 3 deg. curve immediately west of the west end of Annex 
Siding, the noted chainage of same being obtained from the railway engineers. 

All the lines will be found to be well opened up and well blazed throughout; 
large well-marked posts were planted at each mile with iron posts at every third 
mile as indicated in the instructions. Bearing trees were carefully chosen and 
marked, where such were available. 

Throughout the work careful search was made for the lines of the old loca- 
tions shown on the plan accompanying instructions and ties made wherever such 
could be found. 

Observations for Azimuth were taken at least once on each line, time being 
carpfullv checked by meridian transits of the sun. 



64 EEPORT OF THE No. 3 



Soil. 

There was considerable loam and clay land met with, but much of it was so 
broken by rocky hills, and contained so many boulders as to be unfit for agri- 
cultural purposes. The only area that seemed really desirable agriculturally was 
the north four miles of Sackville Township, and the south two miles of Laurie 
Township. In the south-west corner of Home Township an area two miles by 
two miles is also good. The southerly two miles of Sackville Township consists 
of loam, but as the south boundary is approached it is very broken and there are 
a lot of boulders. The agricultural area extends west of the second meridian for 
approximately a mile from the third mile of the west boundary of Sackville to 
the second mile of Laurie. 

There are numerous trails throughout the district opened up in lumbering 
operations. These are now blocked considerably by windfalls, but could readily 
be opened up for the first needs of settlers. 

Timber. 

Practically the whole area covered by the survey has been cut over for lumber 
at a comparatively recent date. 

There is, however, some good white pine in the south-easterly part of Adair 
Township, one particularly good area lying from one-half a mile to a mile north 
of the north boundary of Marks, opposite lots seven and eight of that township. 
"There is good white pine scattered throughout the east three miles of the south 
two miles of Adair Township. 

Minerals. 

The rock throughout this area is mostly greenstone and granite. 

There was very little surface showing of minerals except iron, of which there 
is some indication throughout the whole region, particularly on the southerly part 
of the west boundary of Sackville Township. 

Game. 

Bears and beaver are very plentiful in this area; moose and red deer were 
also seen, but were not very plentiful. 

I am forwarding herewith plan and field notes of survey, timber plan, affi- 
davits, accounts, etc., and trust that everything will be found satisfactory. 

All of which is. respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) E. E. Bingham, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LAXDS AND FOEESTS. 65 

Appendix No. 21. 
Survey of Township Outlines, District of Algoma. 

Alvinston, December 31st, 1919. 

Sir, — 1 beg to report that in accordance with instructions issued April 15th, 
1919, for the survey of township outlines in the District of Algoma, along the 
Opazatika and Kapuskasing Elvers, and south of the Transcontinental Eailway, 
1 proceeded to Opazatika Station on July 2nd, after the usual preparation and 
after engaging a survey party, paddled up Opazatika Eiver to the south boundary 
of McCrea Township and after packing equipment to the south-west angle of 
\[eCrea Township, the outline work was commenced. 

The work was completed and the plan and field notes submitted herewith show 
the character of country in detail, the waters intersected by the lines, and the 
plan and timber map show, generally, the division, as nearly as could be ascer- 
tained, of the classes of country through which the lines passed. 

Owing to low water at the season the work was necessarily commenced, the 
travel to the survey was rendered quite difficult as the Opazatika is very shallow 
and landings could not be made at the usual portages, and owing to the dry season 
in the summer it was quite difficult to obtain water for drinking purposes, and 
in one case water was carried 1% miles to the camp for general use. 

Forest fires in other sections of the country causing a general smoky atmos- 
phere rendered it most difficult to secure astronomical observations in the summer 
and in the fall the weather was so wet and cloudy it was equally difficult to secure 
observations at the times such were needed. However, nine observations were 
obtained and these are given on pages 73 to 81 of the field notes. The calculations 
were made from " Astronomical Field Tables " as issued from the office of the 
Surveyor General, Ottawa. 

The variation of compass varies from 6° to 9° west — generally from 6° to ^14° 
west of Cargill Township and 7° to 9° through Cargill. 

The lines were well opened out and properly blazed, in fact, these are wider 
than usual. 

Posts of the best material obtainable were planted at the end of each mile 
or as shown in the field notes submitted herewith, but in some cases it was im- 
possible to mark bearing trees as some posts were planted in open country (so 
far as trees are concerned) or in brule having a growth of poplar from 1 in. to 2 in. 
diameter. The posts were well made, in general, and properly marked with a 
timber scribe. 

The twenty iron posts sent from your Department were planted as well, 
ter being properly marked as shown in the field notes. 

The astronon-jical observation taken at the north-west angle of Parnell Town- 
'^hip was used to run south astronomically along the boundary of Shearer and 
'arnell to VTTT miles plus 22.83 chains on the same line. 

The observation taken at this point and shown on page 74 governed the line 
south to 111 miles plus 10 chains on the boundary of Ecclestone and Fergus, 
^and the observation at that point the line to the south end of the line between 
^M'ergus and Ecclestone Townships. This observation is given on page 75. 
^B The boundary of Shearer and Fergus was run by angle from the line between 
^B*arnell and Shearer Townships for a chord of a parallel of latitude, as was also 
^^■he boundarv between Parnell and Ecclestone to VT miles plus 2.64 chains, where 



tin 

i 

si: 



66 , EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

the observation given on page 81 again governed the line to the north-east angle 
of Ecclestone, and after turning along the meridian, the boundary of Ecclestone 
and Cargill to miles plus 66 chains, and from this point the observation given 
on page 76 governed the course of the boundary of Ecclestone and Cargill to 
the south end of the line, no further observation being obtainable. 

Commencing at the mile post XVI plus 32.41 chains on the south boundary 
of Ecclestone no observation was obtainable until 11 mile plus 6.80 chains was 
reached on this production and the line was corrected as shown in the observation 
given on page 77. This course was the governing course after turning the proper 
angle for a 9 mile chord at the south-east angle of Ecclestone Township, to V 
miles plus 6.04 chains on the south boundary of Cargill, when the line was 
again corrected as shown in the observation on page 78, and this course governed 
to the south-east angle of Cargill. 

As will be noted the lines east and west were run on chords for the lengths 
of the townships with the Orientation meridian through the centre of the town- 
ship, and the lines north and south are run on the astronomical meridian. 

On the line between Cargill and Sulman Townships which was run from 
the north end, no observation was obtainable at this point and the line between 
Gumming and Owens was produced to 1 mile plus 45.47 chains on the boundar}' 
of Cargill and Sulman when it was found after observation was obtained that 
the line had a bearing as shown on page 79 and it was then decided to run south 
0° 2' east to the south-east angle of Cargill to balance the error in the north 
1 mile plus 45.47 chains, and this bearing was checked by the observation given 
on page 80 and the line found correct, and continued to the south-east angle of 
Cargill. - 

Topography. 

Generally, with the exception of the southern end of the line between Eccle- 
stone and Fergus and immediately east of the Opazatika Eiver on the south 
boundary of Ecclestone where the country is undulating, the country is level or 
rather slightly undulating and as a rule inclined to be swampy. A few small 
creeks, most of which are without flow in a dry year, are met with, and there 
are no lakes of any importance. 

Soil. 

The soil is composed of a subsoil of clay which has an admixture of sand 
which should make it easily workable and the topsoil is a loam and in the lower 
levels, a muck. 

Generally, moss covers the soil west of the Opazatika River, where timber 
was not burned in the last fire. East of this river, fire destroyed what timber 
grew, and as well burned the muck but there has since formed a slight coating 
of loam on the upper levels, and in the lower levels moss again covers the soil. 

The soil is adapted to raising general roots and grains and is very much 
of the nature of the. soil at the Dominion Government Experimental Farm at 
Kapuskasing, where some fine roots and grains are grown. 

The heavier clays will later require tile drainage to make the soil fully 
productive. 

Drainage of the lower levels will not be difficult as good fall is obtainable. 

A few outcrops of ordinary country rock are to be found. - 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 67 



Timber. 

The only timber of considerable size is to be found west of the Opazatika 
Eiver, ranging from 3 in. to 10 in., and in some places to 12 in. or 14 in. This 
timber is spruce, generally from 4 in. to 8 in. diameter, poplar 4 in. to 14 in., 
balsam, 2 in. to 8 in., W. birch, 3 in. to 10 in., dead tamarack, 4 in. to 8 in., with 
some small green tamarack (a new growth), balm of gilead in places 4 in. to 
12 in. Few cedar of value are to be found off the river. 

This portion is also covered with a growth of underbrush, chiefly alders, 
hazel and moose-maple. 

Generally, the timber classification changes rapidly and there does not seem 
to be any body of timber large enough to make profitable operations on a large 
scale. 

East of the Opazatika Eiver, the country has been burned over and is now 
covered with a growth of poplar from 1 in. to 4 in. diameter and white birch- 
about the same size, with a few patches of original timber of the class found 
on the west side of the river and generally covered with a thick growth of alders 
and hazel and in places with a thick growth of small spruce. In places the 
original spruce and tamarack have fallen in " windfalls " which make travel 
across such areas very difficult. 

The timber east of the Opazatika Eiver cannot be said at present to be of 
great value as the poplar and birch are only from 1 in. to 4 in. diameter, but in 
time may be very fine cutting. 

EOADS. 

Probably the best way of reaching the area covered by the survey will be 
later determined; possibly a road from Lowther on the Transcontinental Eailway 
would give the best result. No deposits of gravel were observed on the lines run. 

Minerals. 

No minerals of any kind were found and the few outcrops of rock are grey 
country rock of the kind usual to this section of the countrv. " ' \ 



Game and Msh. 



^fffY!:'' 



Beaver are quite plentiful in this section of the country and have been very 
industrious in damming up the small creeks, and as many as three families are 
to be found fibove one dam in places. The work of these animals considerably 
hindered the progress of the survey. 

Moose are plentiful along the Opazatika Eiver and many signs of bear are to 
be found east of the river. There does not appear to be many deer in this section 
of country. 

Small game does not seem to be so plentiful as usual and only a few part- 
ridge and ducks are to be found. Signs of mink and muskrat were observed. 

The fish to be found in the waters consist generally of pike and pickerely 
and a species of " wall-eyed pike.'' The fish are not large but are quite plentiful. 

Water Powers. 

No survey of water powers was made, as I understand this work was cojn- 
pleted by the surveyors making the traverse of the Opazatika and Kapuskasing 



68 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Elvers. The courses of the rivers are sh'own on the accompanying plan as given 
on the plans for the traverse survey. 

With this report is respectfully submitted: 

1. A general plan. 

2. A timber map. 

3. Field notes of the survey, including astronomical observations. 

4. The account in triplicate. 

'; I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) A. S. Code, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 22. 



Survey of a Meridiax and Base Line ix the Districts of Kenoua, 
Thunder Bay and Patricia. 

- . . TH'ESSALon, February 5th, 1920. 

SiR,^-In accordance with your instructions dated April 15th, 1919, I have 
completed the survey of a meridian and base line in the Districts of Kenora, 
Thunder Bay and Patricia, and beg to submit the following report. 

The meridian line was the northerly extension of the boundary between the 
Districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay, and was commenced at the northerly 
extremity of the portion of the said boundary which was run as far as the 120th 
mile in 1900, by the late A. Mven, O.L.S. The meridian line crossed the 
narrows of Lake St. Joseph, entering the district of Patricia, near the 62nd 
mile, and was continued into the district of Patricia as far as the 120th mile. From 
this point a base line was run due west, on six mile chords of a parallel of latitude, 
for a distance 6f 40 miles, the 40th mile coming in a fairly large river which 
enters Cat Lake from the north. The starting point of the meridian line is 
located about eight miles north of Sturgeon Lake. Sturgeon Eiver was crossed 
just north of the 2nd mile post, and the Canadian Government Eailway was 
crossed at 12 miles 9.39 chains, at a point 19.35 chains east of Fowler Station. 

The meridian line was run north astronomically, and was well cut out and 
blazdd. A substantial wooden post of the best timber available was planted at 
the end df'feVery mile, excepting where the end of a mile came in a lake or stream. 
Wherever this occurred, a post was planted on the nearest shore and the number 
of the nearest mile together with the distance from that mile was marked on the 
post with a scribing iron. Every regular post had the number of the mile marked 
thereon with a scribing iron. At the end of every third mile on the meridian 
line, an iron post was planted beside the wooden one, and the number of the mile 
marked thereon with a cold chisel. In case the end of a mile requiring an iron 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FOEESTS. 69 

post came in water, the iron post was planted beside the wooden post on the 
nearest shore, and was similarly marked. The iron post in every case was a 
piece of 1^^ in. iron pipe, 3 feet long, pointed at one end and forged at the other, 
and painted red. Wherever possible, two bearing trees were marked with the 
letters B.T. and the distance and bearing of each tree recorded in the field notes. 
Substantial stone mounds were erected around the posts wherever stones could 
be secured. 

The base line, as previously stated was run west astronomically on six mile 
chords, of a parallel of latitude, and the same system of planting and marking 
the posts was followed as in the meridian line, excepting that as the base line 
was 40 miles long, and as I was only supplied with 10 iron posts for this line, it 
was obviously impossible for an iron post to be planted every three miles. It was 
decided to plant an iron post at the end of every six mile chord, and the rest 
at three mile intervals, where convenient. Iron posts were therefore planted at the 
following miles: 6, 12, 15, 18, 31, 24, 27, 30, 36 and 40. 

On account of the length of the line, and the fact that no check was possible, 
the line was cut out wide enough to permit of the longest possible sights. The 
instrumental work was almost all done by Mr. W. B. Beatty, O.L.S., and he was 
most careful and accurate in his work. Only twice was it necessary to make a 
correction of more than two minutes in the bearing of either the meridian or 
the base line. Transit stations in swampy ground were avoided as much as 
possible, but wherever they were absolutely necessary, stakes were driven deep 
into the ground for the tripod to rest upon, and a platform built where necessary 
for the transitman to stand upon. A Waltham sidereal watch was used, and 
observations for both azimuth and watch correction were taken at every oppor- 
tunity. These observations were all taken in daylight, and the azimuth calculated 
by means of the tables supplied by the Surveyor-General at Ottawa, for such 
purposes, A table showing the results of the observations and the corrections 
applied is included in the field notes. 

The chaining was all done by two experienced chainmen, and every precaution 
taken to ensure accuracy. A five chain tape was always available, and all water 
stretches under five chains were measured with it, thus avoiding numerous small 
triangulations. This long tape was of very great assistance in chaining base lines 
for triangulating across the larger lake>, satisfactory base lines being obtained 
by this means with much less difliculty than would have been possible with a 
shorter tape. 

The actual cutting of the line was commenced on May 27th, and completed 
on September 23rd. 

Attached to the party were Professor Parsons of the Department of Miner- 
alogy, Toronto University, and two assistants, representing the Bureau of Mines, 
and Mr. Henry Bell, of Peml)roke, with an assistant. These gentlemen were 
instructed to report on the geological and on the timber and agricultural pos- 
sibilities respectively, of the country adjacent to the line. They performed their 
duties in a most faithful and painstaking manner, and as my time was almost 
entirely devoted to the carrying on of the operations incidental to the survey, it 
was impossible for me to see as much of the country as they did. They will 
present their own reports, and will deal with their respective subjects in a detailed 
manner, that is impossible for me, for obvious reasons. A few general remarks 
on the economic possibilities and physical features of the country, however, may 
not be out of place. 



W REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

The line runs through an entirely unsettled section of Northern Ontario, 
the only inhabitants being a few Indians who trap in the winter, but who do 
not appear to travel away from a few main canoe routes during the summer. 
Some of the local Indians were employed at times on the survey, and their local 
knowledge of canoe routes and of the country generally was found to be of very 
great assistance. These Indians were industrious, reliable and above the standard 
of intelligence that one would naturally expect. 

The agricultural possibilities of the country are practically nil. The land 
is for the most part rocky and stony, with considerable areas of swamp consisting 
of a layer of muskeg more or less deep, underlain with sand and boulders resting 
on the rock beneath. Some fairly prominent ridges of sand and boulders occur, 
but not so frequently along the southerly .portion of the meridian line as further 
north. The whole region south of Lake St. Joseph has been swept by fire, appar- 
ently about the time of the construction of the National Transcontinental Rail- 
way, and the Thunder Bay Branch of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. This 
portion of the country is very rough and rocky with numerous lakes of various 
sizes occupying the depressions between the ridges. About sixty per cent, of 
the territory seen from the line, south of Lake St. Joseph, has been burnt within 
ten or twelve years, and the timber destroyed. The economic loss in this respect 
has been very great, as a large amount of good spruce and jack pine timber has 
been destroyed. These burnt areas are now growing up with the usual second 
growth of jack pine, spruce, poplar and white birch characteristic of the country. 
In places the country is almost impassable on account of the tangled masses of 
fallen timber, and the work of cutting the line through these sections was exceed- 
ingly "laborious. The green timber is largely confined to the swamp areas, and in 
some cases the spruce is of fair quality, but the average is rather small. The 
best timber seen on the line south of Lake St. Joseph is close to the Sturgeon 
River, and again north of the large bay extending to the east of Lower Green 
Grass Lake, near mile 41 ; there being in both cases a fine growth of large jack- 
pine and spruce. A few small groves of red pine were seen, the largest one 
being east of the narrows between Green Grass and Lower Green Grass Lakes. 

North of Lake St, Joseph the country is not so rough, there being very few 
of the rock ridges which are so common farther to the south. The country here 
is more gently undulating, with low lying morain like ridges of sand and stones, 
with larger areas of muskeg between. Between miles 65 and 68 there is a pro- 
minent ridge of sand which has been burnt over, of which large portions are now 
absolutely bare. Some parts of this appear to consist of a sandy loam that might 
be productive, but the area is small. A prominent ridge occurs at mile 115. 
This is one of the highest ridges in the country north of Lake St. Joseph. 
Another prominent ridge of sand and gravel occurs- north of mile 26 on the base 
line and extends to the line at mile 27. This ridge is surrounded by a muskeg 
as far as could be seen, but is fairly lieavily timbered with spruce, birch and 
jack pine. 

North of Lake St. Joseph there is a much larger area of green timber, than 
south of the lake, although the average growth is smaller and scrubbier, par- 
ticularly in the more northerly portions of the country. There is one fairly large 
burnt area extending from mile 101 to mile 111, and for a considerable distance 
on either side of the line. This area has been burnt within a year or two. The 
whole country north of Lake St. Joseph, while largely green, has been burnt over 
at intervals, and in very few places was timber seen that is over 75 years old. 



1920-21 DEPAKTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 71 

The second growth which comprises much of the timber is of all ages up to 75 
years. These fires appear to have started from along the main canoe routes used 
by the Indians, and are probably largely due to the carelessness of travellers in 
the use of fire. The timber growth in this section is coming along very nicely, 
and although the annual growth is slow, a new forest will undoubtedly grow up 
that will be of great value provided the fires can be prevented. 

The country south of Lake St. Joseph is intersected by an exceedingly 
intricate system of lakes and streams, which afford means of communication by 
canoe in any direction. Many of the lakes are of fairly large size, almost invariably 
with deeply indented shores, and are dotted with numerous islands. The natural 
beauty of many of these lakes, the shores of which have not been rendered desolate 
by fires, can hardly be surpassed. 

The divide between the waters flowing to the Winnipeg River and to the 
Albany River, occurs near the 24th mile on the meridian line, although the exact 
location could not be determined with any degree of certainty. South of this 
divide the country is drained by the Sturgeon River and its northern tributary, 
the Dog River, of which Island Lake is an expansion. North of this divide an 
exceedingly intricate system of lakes with short river stretches between flows 
towards the Albany River by way of Lake St. Joseph, which it enters about three 
miles east of mile 65 on the meridian line. 

The greater part of the territory adjacent to the line north of Lake St. 
Joseph is drained by tributaries of the Attawapiskat River which finally enters 
James Bay about sixty miles north of the Albany River. The divide between 
AUiany and Attawapiskat waters occurs quite close to Lake St. Joseph, although 
here again it is impossible to designate the exact location with any degree of 
certainty. The largest streams crossed north of Lake St. Joseph are the Gitchie 
Seebe at mile 111, and the Otoskwin River at mile 113. These streams meet about 
three or four miles east of the line, forming the Otoskwin branch of the Attawa- 
piskat River. These are both fairly large streams, with sluggish current broken 
with occasional rapids, at most of which the fall is low, and which are mostly 
caused by boulder bars obstructing the streams, and which make caiioe navigation 
rather difficult in places. The eastern portion of the base line is drained by a 
tributary of the Otoskwin River, while the western portion is drained towards 
the Albany River by way of streams entering Cat Lake. 

There are no water powers of any great importance, chiefly owing to the 
fact that very few of the rapids or falls are of any great height. A number of 
small water powers could be developed, however, as the facilities for water storage 
are excellent on account of the many lakes. There are some falls on the Albany 
River a few miles east of the outlet of Lake St. Joseph which may be of great 
importance in the future, on account of the large drainage area tributary to 
Lake St. Joseph, and the splendid opportunity this lake would afford for reservoir 
purposes. These powers are from forty to sixty miles east of the line, but it is 
thought well to give them passing mention as they will undoubtedly play a most 
important part in any economic development that may occur in this part of the 
country. Similarly on the Cat River, which enters Lake St. Joseph at the west 
end, a number of falls occur. None of these falls are of great height, but water 
powers of considerable importance could be developed, as the drainage area is fairly 
large and the facilities for water storage cannot be excelled. These water powers 
on the Cat River are, of course, much smaller than the ones on the Albany River 
east of Lake St. Joseph. 



72 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Lake St. Joseph is, of course, the most important geographical feature of 
this section of the country. It is a narrow, straggling sheet of water about sixty 
miles long, from Eoot Portage at the western extremity to where the Albany 
River flows out at the eastern end. It has an exceedingly intricate shore line in 
places with many deep bays extending far back from the main body of the lake. 
There are innumerable islands of all sizes, from small bare rocks to some which 
are of several miles in length. The lake for the greater part of its extent is 
rather narrow, but in some places widens out to a width of from six to eight 
miles. The numerous islands make it difficult in many places to get a good idea 
of its dimensions, but the average width is probably not much over two miles. 
Much of the country around Lake St. Joseph has been burnt over at different 
times in the past, and the timber along the shore is largely second growth of 
different ages. The timber on many of the islands appears to be older than 
that on the main shore, probably due to the fact that the islands escaped the fires. 
The shores of Lake St. Joseph are for the greater part low lying, although some 
rather prominent hills occur around the western end of the lake. Lake St. 
Joseph is called the head of the Albany Eiver, although the Cat Eiver which 
enters the north-western extremity of the lake takes its rise probably oue hundred 
miles or more to the north-west and by the time it reaches Lake St. Joseph it 
is a considerable stream. 

The Hudson's Bay Company have a post called Osnaburgh near the eastern 
end of Lake St. Joseph, where a considerable trade in furs is carried on with 
the Indians. Supplies for Osnaburgh Post are brought in from Hudson Station 
on the Canadian Government Eailway, over a very good route by gasoline boat 
across Lost Lake down English Eiver and across Lac Seul, thence by canoe up 
Eoot Eiver to Eoot Portage at the western end of Lake St. Joseph. This portage 
is over the divide between Winnipeg and Albany Eiver waters. From here sup- 
plies are taken to Osnaburgh by a small steamboat which is operated on Lake 
St. Joseph by the Hudson's Bay Company. 

The geological features of the country will be separately reported upon by 
Professor Parsons, therefore, they will receive but passing mention in this report. 
The prevailing rock formation over the whole territory is Laurentian, typical 
rocks being granite and gneiss. Several areas of Keewatin rocks were encountere<l. 
and in almost every case there was a local magnetic attraction of the most pro- 
nounced character. The first of these occurs in the vicinity of Island Lake about 
ten miles north of the Canadian Grovernment Eailway, and extends easterly to 
Lake Savant. The most important area of magnetic disturbance in this belt 
occurs on Kashaweogama Lake lying to the east of Island Lake. An important 
belt of Keewatin rock occurs in the vicinity of Lake St. Joseph, and here again 
the magnetic disturbances are of the most pronounced character, and extend for 
a long distance east and west of the line. Low grade hematite and magnetite 
were seen on some of the islands in the western portion of the lake. Another 
belt of Keewatin occurs between the 79th mile and Clearwater Lake, the contact 
being in the lake, probably between the 87th and 88th miles. This belt is possibly 
an eastern extension of one which crosses Cat Eiver near Slate Lake, and appears 
to be of considerable extent. 

Still another belt of Keewatin extends for a considerable distance along the 
Gitchie Seebe Eiver west of the meridian line, but apparently not extending as 
far east as the line. Considerable magnetic disturbance occurs on this belt, and 
here again there are indications of iron ore. 



1920-21 DEPAliTMENT OF LANDS AXI) FOKESTS. 73 

The base line as far as could be seen, lies entirely in a Lanrentian area, the 
prevailing rocks being granite and gneiss typical of this region. 

A peculiar feature of these Keewatin belts is the fact that the intensity 
of the magnetic disturbances is much greater on some of the lakes than on the 
shore. This may possibly indicate the existence of more or less extensive bodies 
of iron or other magnetic ore, under the waters of the lakes. If I might venture 
a suggestion, it would be that where there are indications of iron ore, particularly 
east of Island Lake, and on Lake St. Joseph, a more detailed examination be made 
with a view of determining definitely the possibilities of developing ore bodies 
on a commercial scale. 

The climate is similar to that of other sections of Central Canada in the 
same latitude. The early part of the summer of 1919 was intensely hot and 
dry, and the growth of vegetation was exceedingly rapid. An instance of this 
is the fact that ripe blueberries were picked on the 30th day of June, and by the 
end of the first week in July they were in great abundance. Potatoes and roots 
generally do well where any attempt is made to cultivate them, although the 
amount of arable land is very small. A few of the Indians have small potato 
patches. One of these was seen on a point on Lake St. Joseph about the 16th 
of July, and showed a good healthy growth. This patch had recently been hoed, 
and showed every evidence of care and industry. A patch of potatoes at the 
Hudson's Bay Company's post at Osnaburgh were in blossom on the 19th of 
July, and looked very well. A slight frost occurred on the night of the 7th of 
August. On the 24th of September the Hudson's Bay Company's post at Cat Lake 
was visited on our way home, and a small patch of potatoes showed hardly any 
evidence of frost. The small lakes usually commence to freeze over about the 
15th of October, and the larger ones are usually frozen over by the end of that 
month. 

Moose and red deer are quite common south of Lake St. Joseph, but not so 
much farther north. Caribou are frequently seen in this region, becoming more 
plentiful as one goes farther north. The ordinary fur-bearing animals are quite 
plentiful, although great destruction of animal and bird life has been caused by 
res which have overrun the country. Partridge were scarce and hardly a rabbit 
was seen all summer. Wild ducks are not as plentiful as one would expect. 
Fish are numerous in all the larger lakes and streams, the principal varieties 

I being pike, pickerel, and suckers. Some excellent white fish were secured from 
Ru Indian on Lake St. Joseph who had a net set in the lake. The Indians appear 
jto make use of fish weirs to a considerable extent, and on some of the streams 
Ireirs were seen which showed much ingenuity in construction. 
The returns to be filed in your Department consist of this report, copies 
of the field notes properly certified, a general plan on mounted drawing paper on 
Ij^t a scale of two miles to an inch, a timber plan on tracing linen on the same 
l^ygcale. and my accounts in triplicate and I trust that these will be found satisfactory. 
Much of the information on the plans was obtained from sketches made ny 
Professor Parsons and Mr. Bell, and I wish to express my appreciation of the 
hearty manner in which these gentlemen co-operated with me in seeing that the 
various phases of the work were carried on to a successful conclusion. I also 
wi.sh to heartily thank Mr. Jabez Williams, transport officer for the Hudson's 
Bay Company at Lac Seul, and Mr. K. Hooker, of Osnaburgh, for courtesy and 
assistance rendered the party during the season. 

6 L.F. 



74 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

In conclusion I would venture to predict that the economic development of 
this section of the country will largely depend upon the discovery of valuable 
minerals in the various areas of Keewatin rocks, and the chances of such dis- 
coveries would appear to be not unfavourable. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) James S. Dobie, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 23. 



Survey of a Meridian Line in the Vicinity of the Ground Hog River, 
IN the Districts of Sudbury and Timiskaming. 

Peterborough, April 15th, 1920. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that agreeable with instructions from 
your Department dated April 15th, 1919, I have completed the survey of meridian 
lines in the Districts of Sudbury and Timiskaming. 

As instructed, I commenced the survey at the north-east angle of the Town- 
ship of Muskego and after getting the necessary observations for latitude and 
azimuth, I ran due north astronomically eight miles seventy-one chains and 
sixty-six links where I intersected the base line surveyed by O.L.S. Niven in 
1899 at a point one hundred and thirty-three chains and forty links east of his 
fifty-four mile posts. From O.L.S, Niven's fifty-four mile posts I ran north 
astronomically eight miles seventy-eight chains and ninety links where I inter- 
sected O.L.S. Neeland's first base line at a point one chain and sixty-nine links 
west of his nine mile posts. After moving these posts to the intersection of 
the meridian and base line I produced my meridian north astronomically nine 
miles and sixty-four links where I intersected O.L.S. Neeland's second base line 
at a point two chains and seventy links west of his nine mile posts. After 
moving these posts to the intersection of the meridian and base line I again 
produced my meridian north astronomically eight miles seventy-nine chains and 
thirty-one links where I intersected O.L.S. Neeland's third base line at a point 
four chains and fifteen links west of his nine mile posts. After moving these 
posts to the intersection of the meridian and base line I again produced my 
meridian north astronomically twenty-four miles six chains and five links to the 
south boundary of the Township of Nansen which I intersected at a point one 
hundred and eight chains and thirteen link? east of the south-west angle of said 
township. 

The meridian line from the north-east angle of the Township of Muskego 
to O.L.S. Niven's base line passes over a rough, rocky, broken country totally 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS AXD FOEESTS. 75 

unfit for agriculture and which has been overrun many times by fire and is now 
destitute of all timber of value. Several lakes were crossed on this line, all of 
which contain good clear water but little if any fish. The rock is of the Huronian 
formation but as far as I could see, and 1 examined it closely many times, is 
destitute of mineral. From O.L.S. Niven's base line to the southerly limit of 
the clay belt, a distance of a little over four miles, the line passes over a gently 
undulating sandy country which has evidently been repeatedly burnt over and 
is now practically destitute of either green or burnt timber of any description. 
From this point southerly (limit of the clay belt) to the south boundary of the 
Township of Nansen the character of the country is all the same, generally level 
or gently undulating and covered with spruce up to fourteen inches, poplar to 
twenty inches, white birch to ten inches, dead tamarac, scrub cedar and alder 
underbrush — the land is good clay free from stone with clay subsoil and will, 
no doubt, some day support a large number of people. 

Patches of brule are met with here and there and especially along the 
westerly shore of the Ground Hog Eiver. Practically no outcroppings of rock 
were encountered in this forty-seven miles. The Piskanogami Elver is crossed 
between the first and second mile north of O.L.S. Neeland's first base line; it 
is a fine clear stream and has many valuable and easily developed falls, two of 
which lie just east of my meridian. 

The Ground Hog Eiver — which I did not cross with my meridian but which 
is very close to the line at a point twenty-seven miles north of Niven's base line 
is also a fine river for many miles but is sadly broken by an eight mile flat rapid 
between this point and the Grand Trunk Pacific. This tract of country lying 
between the Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific Eailways is a veritable 
paradise for hunters and trappers. Moose are very plentiful and it is not an odd 
sight to see four or five in one of the rivers or lakes at the same time. Bear, 
beaver, marten and otter were also frequently seen along the rivers. 

I also beg to submit with this report a plan showing the topography of the 
country passed over, also a timber plan and field notes all of which I trust will 
be found complete and satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) J. W. Fitzgerald, 



The Jlonourable, ihe Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Out. 



Ontario Land Surveyor, 



Appendix No. 24. ' 

Survey of Part of the Townshii' of Xansex, Distwict of Timiskamino. 

Pkterborough, April 15th, 1920. 

Sir, — T have the honour to report that agreeable with instructions from your 
Department dated April 15th, 1919, I have subdivided the residue of the Town- 
ship of Xansen in the District of Timiskaming into regular lots of one hundred 



76 REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

and fifty acres each. The residue of the township allotted to me for subdivision 
consisted of lots one to twenty-nine inclusive, in concessions one, two, three and 
four, the northerly eight concessions having been subdivided by O.L.S, Dempster 
in 1912. Agreeable with your Departmental instructions, I commenced the sub- 
division at a spruce post marked one and one-half miles on the east boundary 
of the township, planted by O.L.S. James Hutcheon in 1910, and after securing 
the necessary observation for azimuth at this point, I ran due west astronomically 
across the first six lots leaving half a vchain for road allowance immediately west 
of the east boundary and one chain for j-oad allowance between lots six and seven. 
I then picked up O.L.S. Dempster's side line between lots six and seven at the 
front of the fifth concession and produced it due south astronomically to the 
south boundary of the township. I then produced the line between concessions 
two and three west across lots seven to twelve inclusive. I then picked up O.L.S. 
Dempster's side line between lots twelfe and thirteen at the front of the fifth 
concession and produced this line south astronomically to the south boundary. 
I carried out the same procedure to the westerly limit of the township. 

All the regular lots were made twenty-five chains and twenty-five links in 
width by fifty-nine chains and fifty links in depth containing one hundred and 
fifty acres each. I also cut out and rechained the south boundary giving the 
regular lots on the front of the first concession a uniform width of twenty-five 
chains and twenty-five links. Substantial posts of the most durable wood procur- 
able in the vicinity were planted to define the corners of the lots and inter- 
sections of the lines and the iron posts forwarded to me from your Department 
were also properly marked and planted at the points indicated on the projected 
plan, which points I have also indicated on my plan. 

The portion of the township subdivided by me is well watered by numerous 
creeks, there is, however, only one lake of any extent which lies on lots five and 
six in the first concession. 

The first four concessions of this township may be described as a generally 
level or gently undulating country timbered with spruce up to twelve inches 
in diameter, poplar up to twelve inches in diameter, white birch, balsam and 
cedar up to ten inches in diameter interspersed with swamps covered with spruce, 
dead tamarac, scrub cedar and alder underbrush, scattered patches of brule of 
small extent and covered with small poplar, white birch and Avillow. The soil 
on the uplands is, generally speaking, a good clay loam rich in humus and 
practically free of stone, with clay subsoil. In the lowlands and swamps the soil 
is black muck with clay subsoil. Only a few small outcroppings of rock occur 
in this part of the township. I consider fully fifty per cent, of the first four 
concessions suitable for mixed farming and am of the opinion that with a proper 
system of drainage, fully fifty per cent, of the remainder can be made so. 

I also beg to submit with this report a plan showing the acreage and topo- 
graphy, also timber plan and field notes all of which T hope will be found complete 
and satisfactory. 

T have the honour to be, Sir, 

! Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) J. W. Fitzgerald, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



I 



1920-21 DErARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 77 



Appendix No. 25. I 

SuitVKY OF PaIJT of THE BOUNDARY LiXE BETWEEN THE DlSTlHCTS OF RaINY 

River and Kenora, 

Fort Frances, February 16th, 1920. 

Sir, — Instructions to survey part of the boundary line between the Districts 
of Rainy River and Kenora, and three meridian lines running south therefrom, 
were received early in June, but the survey was not commenced until August l:th, 
as, on account of the general strike, it was impossible to procure any tents in 
Winnipeg, 

I left Fort Frances on August 4th, and proceeded via the Cascades and 
Manitou Lake to Smooth Rock Lake, where my first camp was established. Having 
found traces of the 6th meridian near Bear Lake, 1 re-ran the line through 
dense second growth, on 1894 brule, and found the iron post marking the 24th 
mile. From this post I started the boundary line, my course being determined 
from the meridian line, and made preparations to observe Polaris at night. I 
was unable to see the star as a heavy rain storm came on in the afternoon and 
lasted all night. I therefore ran the line on to Smooth Rock Lake and there 
observed Polaris at Eastern Elongation, finding the line .02' N. Correcting for 
this I continued west, to the 6th mile, where I deflected north six minutes, 
checking the instrumental deflection by the use of a deflection offset of 1.378 
inches at a distance of one chain. Thereafter, this deflection was used at each 
six miles. Wooden posts were planted at each mile and iron posts at every 
three miles as instructed. 

I continued the line to the 12th mile, whence I ran south twelve miles on 
the 1st meridian, and on the completion of this line 1 continued west on the 
base line to the 24th mile, marking the posts as instructed from 1 to 12 in each 
section of the base. I then ran south again twelve miles on the 2nd meridian, and 
in a similar manner I ran west to the 36th mile and thence south on the 3rd 
meridian as far as Kishkutena or Height of Land Lake. 

Winter set in very early, there was a heavy fall of snow on October 10th, 
and thereafter the weather was very bad, snow, rain or sleet nearly every day, so 
that the ground and the trees were entirely covered with snow. I continued the 
base line west until October 25th, working whenever the weather permitted ; on 
the 24th, over six inches of snow fell and froze in the creeks, so that on the 25th, 
we were unable to break through to Crooked Pine Lake. 

As I had been unable to find any trace of the 7th meridian, with which I 
had to intersect, and as I had not been supplied with field notes showing tbd 
postion of the 7th mile post thereon, I decided to postpone finishing this part 
of the line until after the freeze up, and started back for Height of Land Lake 
to finish the 3rd meridian. On the 27th and 28th I continued south but on the 
28th I was compelled to postpone the work as the lakes were all covered with 
about six inches of snow ice, which, while practically unbreakable from a canoe 
would not carry a man's weight. I made a cache of my supplies and outfit and 
started for lionie, having to go by way of Off Lake to Barwick. 

On December 2nd, I again started out and drove to Sabaskong Bay, where T 
completed the base line, returning to Clearwater Lake, I then completed the 3rd 
meridian, reaching Fort Frances on the 13th December. 



78 EEPOKT OF THE No. 3 

Plan. 

The plan of this work has been extended beyond the actual limits of the 
survey in order to show connections with the base and meridian lines previously 
run. The outlines of all lakes and streams have been shown with the connecting 
creeks and portages, and the outlines of all timber berths and mining locations 
of which I have record have been plotted. 

Connection. 

I have been unable to reach any definite conclusion as to where this base line 
should intersect the 7th, meridian. 

Using Niven's chainages the lengths of the east and west boundaries are :- — 

East Boundary. West Boundary. 

24 miles on 6th meridian East Boundary, Kingsf ord 6m.5c.59 

lm.37c.93 connection " " Richardson. . .6m. 6c.50 to 6th m. 

— 6th m. DOSt to 49th 6m.9c.(>0 

25m.37c.93 49th to base 7m.l8c.41 



i.e. base line lc.57 too far north 25m.39c.50 

But Niven's 1st base having a latitude of 48° 45' 30" would be at a distance 
of 16m.55.83 south from the 49th, which would put the 34th mile post at a 
distance of 7m.34c.l7 north of the 49th. The latitudes given on O.L.S. Niven's 
plans do not appear to be quite correct. Latitude of Carpenter base is given 
as 48° 44' 10", by distance south of 49th, this should be 48° 44' 08.4". 

Latitude of first base is given as 48° 45' 30" by distance lm.37c.93 north 
of Carpenter base this should be 48° 45' 25.3". 

Latitude of 3nd base at 34th mile is 48° 50' 43", this gives a latitude for 
the 1st base, six miles south, of 48° 45' 39". 

Latitude of my base is 49° 06' 16.7" from which a line 34 miles south would 
have a latitude of 48° 45' 36.3". 

If the latitudes given for the Carpenter base and the 1st base are taken 
the distance on the connection line would be lm.43c.63 in place of lm.37c.93 
as given by Mr. Niven. All of this seems to show that the latitude of Niven's 
1st base at the 90th mile would agree very closely with that of a line 34 miles 
south of my base. 

There is an excess in my chainage between the 6th and 7th meridians. 
Using Niven's chainages and following his base and meridian lines the distances 
are : — 

South line, 6th meridian to Carpenter meridian ^^^^^-JS 

Divergence of meridians on 19m.40c.00, 1st base to Carpenter base 89 

2852C.64 
Convergence of meridians on this distance across Carpenter ^c.95 

2847C.69 
Carpenter meridian to 7th meridian : 882^.93 

3730C.62 

Convergence • 20cM 

3709C.82 
Chained distance • 3728c.71 

Surplus 18C.89 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 79 

In explanation of part of this excess I would point out that on working 
out the departures of the courses and distances given on the right of way plan 
of the Canadian Northern Eailway there are surpluses found on two sections, viz, : — 

Surplus. 

Across lots 7 to 12, Halkirk 2c.81 

Across Rainy Lake, from west boundary, Lot 36 Watten to I. R. line, 
thence west following I. R. lines to Carpenter base, this all being 
my own chainage 7c.91 

Also that in every case where I have rechained Niven's lines I have found 
excess, in the lines included in this plan these surpluses show: — 

Sxirplus. 

South boundaries. Potts and Fleming Oc.86 

South boundary, Dance and North boundary Miscampbell Oc.83 

West boundary of Potts, between Niven's posts Ic75 



Soil. 

None of the land in the vicinity of these, lines is of any value for agricultural 
purposes. The whole of the country is formed of rocky ridges with swamps, 
lakes and streams in the valleys between. 



Timber. 

The accompanying timber plan shows that practically the whole of the area 
included has been burnt over. The probable dates of these fires has been deter- 
mined from the apparent age of the second growth timber, and has been indicated 
on the plan. This second growth is nearly all jack pine, with poplar, birch 
and spruce, only in a few places is there any second growth of red or white pine, 
these places are also indicated on the plan. When these fires passed over the 
country most of the large pine escaped destruction; all of this has since been 
cut, with the exception of scattering trees far from water, so that there is now 
no merchantable timber left except between my 3rd meridian and the 7th meridian, 
where the spruce and cedar swamps escaped the fires, and which are yet of value 
for pulpwood and cedar poles and posts. The tamarac in all these swamps has been 
killed by the Larch Fly. 

Minerals. 

No work has been done for many years on any of the locations which 
are shown on the plan, nor is it possible to give any estimate of their value. 
That many of the veins carry gold and other minerals in what should be paying 
quantities is undoubted, but so far mining has not been successful. It is certain, 
however, that in the future there will be renewed activity in mining in this 
district. The only evidence of any activity in the vicinity of the lines is between 
Furlonge and Stonedam Lakes, where several mining claims have been staked 
out and assessment work done on deposits of copper and iron pyrites. North 
of the base line, on Schist Lake, there is a good showing of iron ore on which 
some test pits have been sunk. Transportation difficulties, however, render these 
claims of little value at the present time. 



80 EEPORT OF THE Xo. 3 

Samples. 

Rock samples were taken at various points as indicated in the field notes. 
These have been forwarded to the Department of Lands and Forests. 

I have the honour to be^ Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) D. J. GiLLON, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
lite Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 26. 

Traverse of Missinaibi Lake and River and Tributary Waters, Districts 

OF Algoma and Sudbury. 

Sault Ste. Marie, February 16th, 1920. 

Sir, — Under instructions from you dated 8th May, 1919, to make survey 
of Dog, Crooked and Missinaibi Lakes, I commenced organizing for this survey 
on the 21st May. I left Sault Ste. Marie with complete outfit and four men for 
Missinaibi Station where I started survey of Dog Lake on 22nd May. 

This survey has been carried out in strict accordance with instructions. 
From chained base lines a complete triangulation survey was carried out. Astrono- 
mic bearings were carried throughout and observations taken at intervals of not 
more than fifteen miles. Instrument and stadia rod were checked from time 
to time and continued in good adjustment. Stadia rod was used with two targets 
and readings taken by competent rod man and recorded carefully, and work 
checked and plotted every evening. Outlines of shores and islands were obtained 
by stadia readings from triangulation points on short traverses therefrom. 

At intervals of about a mile apart along the shores of the lakes at con- 
spicuous points, a tree was blazed and numbered, and where trees were not avail- 
able, a post was planted — marked and well mounded with rock. 

Dog Lake Report. 

On the westerly shore of Dog Lake the south boundary of Township Forty- 
seven, Range Twenty-seven was found, opened up and re-blazed and a new post 
planted and mounded with rock together with the old post. From the south- 
east angle of Township Forty-six, Range Twenty-seven, the line between Town- 
ships Forty-five and Forty-six was opened up and re-blazed westerly approxi- 
mately two miles to the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway. At the 
various points where the line intersected the shores of Dog Lake, posts were 
planted and mounded with rock, A bench mark painted on solid rock was estab- 
lished near lake shore at Missinaibi Station ; to Canadian Pacific Railway datum. 

The area of Dog Lake is about twenty-two and five-tenth square miles and 
has approximately one hundred and fifty miles of shore line and seventy islands. 
(See schedule.) 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 81 



For storage purposes the highest level that could be maintained is in my 
opinion dictated by the elevation of the Height of Land at the east end which 
is only about seven feet above water level shown on plan. 

The Canadian Pacific Eailway tracks are in general at about a constant eleva- 
tion of twenty to twenty-five feet above lake level as observed during survey. 

The outlet is narrow and downstream the river falls rapidly between solid 
rock banks and would give good opportunity for controlling dams. The capacity 
for storage is in general terms one hundred and sixty square mile feet. 

The shores slope up so that water area at plane seven feet above stage at 
time of survey will show little increase in area. There are very few marshes 
or low spots. 

Tributary creeks are few in number and with the exception of McMurtry 
Lake, the bodies of water tributary are all shown on plan. McMiirtry Lake is 
said to be about six miles and might average a mile wide. It is connected to 
Dog Lake by a small river about twenty chains long with very little fall and 
it should be a good additional storage. The Loch Lomond liiver would not be 
flooded as there is a considerable fall near its entrance to Dog Lake. 

A very small amount of timber would .be affected by- flooding. Almost the 
whole of Dog Lake territory has been visited by fire on three different occasions, 
namely: About the year 1890 the district was almost completely burned over, 
followed again by fires in the years 1905 and in 1915 the country around the 
easterly end of the lake was again swept by fire. Areas of mature timber still 
exist such as pulpwood and tie timber. The second growth timber from fire- 
swept country is principally poplar to six inches in diameter. 

As a summer resort this lake has attractive possibilities being very easily 
reached by the Canadian Pacific Eailway at Missinaibi Station. There are many 
first class cariiping places with excellent sand beaches and the second growth 
timber is of sufficient size; to give an attractive appearance. 

The waters of the lake abound with fish of various species such'as pike, 
pickerel, trout, white fish and herring. 

As a country for moose hunting this district has few superiors, bear also 
being plentiful. 

Crooked Lake Eeport. 

Crooked Lake in the District of Sudbury has an area of about one and eighty- 
three one-hundredths square miles and approximately thirty miles of shore line 
and twenty-three islands. The islands principally are contained within the middle 
third of the length of the lake. The shores generally rise with a gentle slopo 
from the waters edge and in no place are precipitous. Lake bed and shores are 
in general sand and boulders and with occasional rock outcrop. Both ends of 
lake are very shallow with mud bottom so much so that paddling is difficult on 
account of limited depth of water. Lake throughout appears to have comparatively 
small depth. The shores are practically free from marshes so that a moderate 
amount of increase in stage of water would not greatly increase area. Height 
of Land is about seven feet above observed stage of Crooked Lake. 

The timber as noted on plan consists mostly of second growth composed 
of jack pine, spruce, balsam, birch, poplar and cedar interspersed with patches 
of brule. i . .r 

•• Fish are fairly plentiful. Game comprises moose and bear principally, the 
latter especially being attracted by the plentiful supply of bluebierries. 



83 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



MissiNAiBi Lake Eepokt. 

On account of continued bad weather and approach of winter the traverse 
of this lake was not completed. About fifteen miles at the north-east end of the 
lake is yet unsurveyed. 

The portion surveyed to date comprises a long and comparatively straight 
stretch of lake about twenty miles in length and averaging from one-quarter to 
three-quarter miles in width with a connecting course at mid-length northward 
from Fairy Point about one and one-half miles, and north-east from this about 
parallel to the remainder of the lake there is an arm about nine miles long and 
varying in width from one-quarter to three-quarter miles. 

In general, the lake has a great depth and in no places were any shallow 
areas encountered. Navigation on any part of the lake would be possible for 
large tugs. 

The shores of the lake are • rocky and in many places precipitous. There 
are a few limited areas of marsh along the shores of the lake but flooding would 
not materially increase area. 

Crooked Lake is a tributary to this lake entering it at the west end of the 
north-east arm above noted about three miles in an airline from Fairy Point. 
At the entrance to Missinaibi Lake there is a fall of fifteen feet high and up- 
stream from this about three and one-half chains is a fall about fifteen feet high 
which is one and one-half chains from the outlet of Crooked Lake. 

The lake has long been used by traders as a link to James Bay. It is very 
probable that this lake would make an excellent storage, for power development 
on Missinaibi Eiver but the outlet I have not yet examined. 

Timber such as red and white pine are scarce, only a small amount of this 
•species scattered throughout the lake district. Spruce and balsam interspersed 
with birch, poplar and cedar will be found in large quantities together with jack 
pine suitable for tie timber. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) C. E. Kenny, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 27. 
Survey of Certain Township Outlines in the District of Algoma. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., December 10th, 1919. 

Sir, — We have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of 
certain township outlines in the District of Algoma, made under instructions 
from the Minister of Lands and Forests, dated at Toronto, May 1st, 1919. 

The survey party, under our Mr. Eoss, left Sault Ste. Marie on June 5th, 
:and proceeded to the "west boundary of the Township of Wicksteed by way of the 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 83 

Algoma Central and Canadian National Railways. Actual work was commenced 
on June ?th, and completed on August 31st. The party arrived back in Sault 
Ste. Marie on August 24th. 

During the whole course of the work we only lost half a day on account of 
rain, but this dry weather was the cause of many forest fires. We were chased 
on to an island in a lake at the south-east corner of the Township of Lessard 
and held there for three days. It was then necessary to cut our way througli 
burning country to avoid starving. We also had great difficulty with labour 
throughout the whole course of the work. 

We first ran our 2nd base line west astronomically about ten miles, from 
the north-west corner of the Township of Wicksteed. We then ran north astrono- 
mically nine miles from the north-west corner of the Township of Wicksteed. 
From the nine mile post on this line we ran about ten miles west astronomically 
on our 3rd base line. From this point we backed up to the south-west corner 
of the Township of Wicksteed by way of Nagagami Lake. Obakagami River and the 
Canadian National Railway. From there we ran our 1st base line w^est astrono- 
mically twenty miles thirty-five chains and ten links, to O.L.S. Niven's boundary 
line. From the nine mile post on this line we ran north astronomically twenty- 
seven miles two chains and thirty-four links. The intersection with the 2nd 
base line pointed to a mistake in chainage and this was discovered on the 1st base 
line. A tally stake at eight miles seventy-seven chains was mistaken for the 
nine mile stake and the meridian was run from this point. Posts to the west 
on the 1st base line were not affected. An error of one chain in measuring 
the base lines of each of two triangles was made between the 9th and 18th mile 
of the meridian. This was corrected throughout and all posts moved to true 
positions and the notes corrected. When we intersected the 2nd base line with 
our meridian, this base line was produced west astronomically to the Algoma- 
Thunder Bay boundary, making it a total length of twenty miles thirty-one 
chains and eighteen links. The last line to be run was the production of the 
3rd base line west astronomically to the boundary line. This line has a total 
length of twenty miles twenty-seven chains and eight links. 

We came out to the railway along the boundary line and took the train to 
Sault Ste. Marie from the station at Lux. My second chainman informed me 
on our return that the distance on the north boundary of the Township of Foch 
between the north-east corner and the 1st mile post is seventy-nine chains and 
eighty-five links and between the first and second mile posts, eighty chains and 
fifteen links. The explanation is as follows. We had to swear in a new chainman 
for that day, and he, in spite of instructions, held at the end of the steel in 
place of the end of the brass handle. This error was corrected by the chainman 
in the next mile which is planted two miles from the corner but he did not 
correct the position of the first mile post and did not report the error. 

General. 

The territory covered might be divided into two parts by an imaginary line 
drawn about three miles south of the Canadian National Railway, and parallel 
to it. To the south of this line it is very rough and rocky, to the north it is a 
rolling, sandy, clay country. 

Soil. 

The soil in the Townships of Flanders, Nagagami, Frances and Hiawatha 
is for the most part a sandy clay loam covered with black muck. There are 



.84 EEPOKT OF THE No. 3 

scattered areas of very gravelly clay of glacial origin. The valleys and low lying 
land in the Township of Lessard and Foch are arable but the total area of useful 
country from an agricultural point of view is very small. These townships are 
rock in the main. 

TiMBEK. 

The Township of Lessard and the easterly nine miles of the Township of 
Foch are heavily timbered with large spruce, poplar and birch. Fire swept the 
southerly two miles of these townships during the summer of 1919. The westerly 
two miles of the Township of Foch has been swept clean by fire some twenty years 
ago and is still barren. The Townships of Nagagami, Flanders, Hiawatha and 
Frances are wooded with spruce from 3 in. to 8 in. in diameter, together with a 
certain amount of banksian pine near the Canadian National Eailway. There is ;; 
very large burnt area in the neighbourhood of the line between the Townships of 
Nagagami and Flanders, Frances and Hiawatha. 

MiNEEALS. 

The rock formation is entirely Laurentian as it came under our observation, 
being granite and gneiss. We saw no indications of minerals. 

Watee Powers. 

There is one fall on the Obakagami Eiver about three miles south of the 
lake of that name, which would develop about 1,000 horse-power if full use were 
made of the storage capacity of Obakagami Lake. A thirty foot dam could be 
cheaply constructed between rock walls to have a crest of about one hundred 
feet. Aside from this, the repaids on the Obakagami and Nagagami Eivers are of 
no consequence from a power development point of view. 

Fish and Game. 

Practically all the rivers and streams in this area abound in speckled trout. 
There are as well, pickerel, pike, maskinonge, whitefish and suckers. We are 
unable to make a complete report as to fish as it would be necessary to use a net 
to get the information. 

There are great numbers of moose and a few deer. There did not appear 
to be any rabbits and there were very few partridge. 

We are sending under separate cover, field notes, plans and accounts in 
connection with our work. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

i Your obedient servants, 

. _. (Sgd.) Lang & Eoss, 

■ ■ ■ ''-ti.-' 

' — ' ' Ontario Land Surveyors. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS. 85 

Appendix No. i2S. 

To Re-establish Part of the Boundary of the Algonquin Provincial Park, 

District of Nipissing. 

Pembroke, January 31st, 1920. 

Sir, — Acting under your instructions of August 6th, 1919, I proceeded to 
Sligo, a camp on the Bonnechere River where it crosses the south boundary of 
the Township of Guthrie. I commenced work with a party of eight men on 
August 16th, 1919, and continued without interruption until December 12th, 1919. 

During this time I retraced the south boundary of Guthrie from the north- 
west angle of Burns to the Township of Master; the south boundary of Master; 
the east boundaries of Master, Stratton and Bronson; the north boundary of 
Bronson; the east boundary of Edgar, across concessions eleven to sixteen inclusive; 
and the north boundary of the Township of Edgar; a total distance of sixty-six 
and a quarter miles. 

All old posts found were renewed as instructed and iron bars placed at all 
township corners, excepting the south-west and north-west angles of McKay and 
the north-west corner of Edgar. The lines were well re-blazed and where timber 
was scarce posts were planted along the centre line of road allowances about ten 
chains apart and marked P.L. on the side facing the Algonquin Park, so as to 
facilitate following the line, especially in burnt parts. 

I am enclosing in a parcel to your address, notes, plans and diary, with 
pay sheets, accounts, receipts and statements in triplicate, as required by your 
instructions. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) J. L. Morris, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The TJonourable, ilie Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 29. 

Survey of Certain Township Outlines on the Kapuskasing River, 

District of Algoma. 

Ottawa, January 5th, 1920. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions of May 1st, 1919, re the survey 
of certain township outlines along the Kapuskasing River in the District of 
Algoma, I have the honour to submit the following report. 

T left Ottawa on the evening of June 10th, and after stop])ing in North Bay 
during the day of June 11th, arrived at Agate on the afternoon of June 12th. 

The station here is within 150 feet of Kapuskasing Lake and we made our 
first camp on its shores. T had my provisions shipped by freight and my assist- 



86 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

ant, who had gone on ahead, had everything in readiness, including our iron 
posts, and on the morning of June 13th we loaded our outfit into five canoes 
and started down the Kapuskasing Eiver. 

The river at this time of the year was reasonably high and made canoeing 
much more pleasant, as we were enabled to " run " several rapids that in lower 
water would require portaging. The longest portage we had was- about one mile 
in length and was the second last one before we came to our work. On the stretch 
of river extending through our work there were no portages or rapids, our last, 
one going in being at the south boundary of Allenby Township. We left part 
of our provisions on the south boundary of Allenby and took the remainder down 
to the old G. T. Eailway cache near the north-west corner of Allen])y Township and 
made camp right at this corner of this township. 

On the morning of June 23rd, we started on the meridian between Oscar 
and Concobar Townships, after having observed on the line the previous evening. 
This line was for the most part heavily wooded and undulating, having good 
clay soil on the higher places, with a subsoil of clay in the wet and marshy 
places. On the morning of June 27th, we had quite a snowflurry and the same 
evening it froze quite hard, sufficient to form ice about one-quarter inch thick 
on our water pails. Owing to the fact that. two of my men disappointed me and 
one of my chainmen being unable to come in until July 1st, I was obliged to- 
send out for more men and my assistant went out to Kapuskasing Station return- 
ing with four men. We made a main camp at the north-west corner of Concobar 
Township, and from here worked out two and a half miles east to the Kapuskasing" 
Eiver, the land being generally high and undulating and for the most part 
heavily wooded with large timber. Then we ran west on the line between Oscar 
and Bourinot Townships. While this land was undulating there was more low 
land as we got farther away from the river. In the fifth and sixth miles of this- 
line, we encountered some good cedar up to fifteen and eighteen inches in diameter. 
The last quarter of a mile was through very open, small second growth poplar on a 
sandy loam. No bearing trees were marked here, as there was nothing large- 
enough to be of use ^for this purpose. No trace was found of the westerly 
boundary of the township having been run yet, so we produced our lines six 
chains beyond the nine mile post, and returned to the easterly boundary of the- 
township. 

We then ran north on the meridian between Bourinot and Shanly Townships. 
The first couple of miles of this line was mostly through heavy timber with 
thick underbrush. From the second to the fifth mile was good pulpwood, mostly 
poplar, and the best we encountered anywhere on the line, while from the fifth 
to the ninth miles the land was higher and had been burnt over at some previous 
period. There is considerable second growth and windfall in this area. The 
nine mile post was planted on a rocky ridge, or outcrop of Keewatin. O.L.S. 
Code's line had not been run yet, so we proceeded on our line six chains past 
the nine mile post. On this line we encountered two lakes, as shown on the plan,, 
and one day we canoed up to work following the stream from our camp near the- 
four mile post, to our line on the north shore of the lake. We also utilized this 
stream for moving camp out to the Kapuskasing, and down to the south boundary 
of Allenby. 

From here we packed east taking the provisions from our cache to the south- 
east corner of Allenby Township, and proceeded to run the meridian between 
Allenby and Seaton Townships. When we arrived at this corner we found that 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 87 

Sutcliffe and Neelands had run their line out to this point a few days previous. 
We ran the line to the north-east corner of Concobar Township and then we 
turned to our nine mile post, and ran west to the Kapuskasing Eiver, and the 
westerly boundary of the Township of Concobar. 

On these latter lines the country for the most part was low and wet with 
open tamarac swamp or a thick growth of spruce, tamarac and balsam. Towards 
the north-easterly corner of Concobar Township, we encountered low ridges or 
knolls of clay or sandy clay loam, with some heavy timber thereon. 

We reached the Kapuskasing and on August 4th, I left my assistant tO' 
run west on the Maude, Oscar Chord, while I went out to Kapuskasing to arrange 
for the disbanding of the party at the completion of the work. 

I took one of my chainmen out with me as he had a poisoned hand and 
needed medical attention. This coupled with the fact that a couple of weeks 
previous I had to send out one of my Indians, necessitated my bringing in more 
men. So I returned with two men and a boy along with some provisions, to 
complete the work. 

On reaching the nine mile post on the Maude, Oscar Chord, we were unable- 
to locate Speight's line, run in 1909. We spread out and though we made a. 
thorough search, we were unable to locate it, possibly because there was a heavy 
undergrowth of alder, and as the west boundary of Oscar Township had not been 
run yet. So we produced our line seven chains past the nine mile post, and 
returned to camp. 

We then continued to run east on the chord, between Shanly and Concobar. 
When about four and one-half miles of this line had been completed one of our 
Indians, who had previously been troubled with appendicitis, was threatened with 
a recurrence and had to go out. Two others who for some time past had been 
anxious to go bear hunting, decided to leave and could not be persuaded to stay. 
This left me short of men and as I had only enough provisions to finish the 
job working with a complete party, I decided to run only as far as the south- 
east corner of Shanly Township, and then return. This we did, and continuing 
on down the Kapuskasing Eiver arrived at the station of the same name, on 
the Canadian Government Eailway, on Avigust the 18th. 

The river was quite shallow in a great many places coming out, and it was- 
with difficulty we were enabled to get through. At Kapuskasing I paid off my 
men and arrived in Ottawa, on August the 20th. 

The country through which we worked was for the most part comparatively 
low, the land and timber on the west side of the river being much superior to 
that on the east. On the latter side, it was practically level throughout, being^ 
covered with open tamarac; in places, while in others a thick growth of tamarac, 
spruce and balsam, interspersed with thick alder undergrowth. 

However, on the easterly boundary of Concobar, we , encountered some larger 
timber, e.g., balm of gilead, birch, and spruce, etc., as the ground here appeared 
to rise slightly, being very gently undulating. 

On this side of the river, the soil was clay, or moss, with a clay subsoil, with 
a few sandy knolls. 

On the west side of the river, the country for the most part is undulating 
and is quite heavily timbered. The timber on the higher lands is quite large, 
from six to eighteen inches in diameter, or even larger in some cases, and is of a 
good quality, birch, spruce, balsam, poplar, balm of gilead and cedar, while the 
valleys are tamarac, spruce and balsam, or alders. 



88 KEPOET OF THE ' No. 3 

When running west on the chord between Oscar and Bourinot Townships, 
we encountered some really good cedar, which has every indication of extending 
for a considerable distance north and south of the line. 

The burnt area encountered apparently embraces the north-westerly corner 
of Bourinot Township as shown on the accompanying timber plan. The land 
apparently rises towards the end of the township and the nine mile post on the 
Bourinot. Shanly meridian is on an outcrop of Keewatin. 

We encountered no economic minerals whatever, there being only a few scat- 
tered boulders or low rocky ridges on the Oscar, Bourinot Chord, the Bourinot, 
Shanly meridian and the Oscar-Maude Chord. 

The land on the west side of the river is generally speaking good clay soil 
on the higher elevations, with a clay subsoil in the lower and wet places. 

The game in this part of the country is plentiful, there being abundance of 
moose, bear, beaver and ducks. 

At certain places no iron posts were planted as shown in the field notes 
iittached hereto, as I had none at my disposal, having used the number sent 
me for this work. 

Astronomic observations were taken whenever weather conditions would per- 
mit, the work throughout being carried on under my personal supervision and the 
foregoing report is respectfully submitted. 

• I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) N. B. MacRostie, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 30. 
To Subdivide the Township of Foavler, District of Thunder Bay, 

Port Arthur, January 12th, 1920. 

Sir, — We beg to report that in accordance with instructions issued from 
your Department dated April 15th, 1919, we have completed the survey of the 
Township of Fowler, in the District of Thunder Bay. 

This township is bounded on the south by the Township of Ware, on the 
east by the Township of Jacques, on the west by the Township of Forbes and 
the Grand Trunk Pacific Block No. 1, and on the north by Dog Lake and the 
un surveyed lands of the Crown. 

The south-east corner of this township is about twenty-one miles north-west 
from the City of Port Arthur. The road from Port Arthur is well graded and 
gravelled to within a mile of the south-east corner of the Township. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 89 



The survey was commenced at the south-west angle of the Township of 
Jacques. From this point a mile was measured on the west boundary of Jacques 
and from here the line between concessions one and two was run west astronomic- 
ally to the west boundary of the township. On this line posts were planted 
at intervals of 40.00 chains to mark the corners of lots fronting thereon. From 
the end of each mile on this concession line the sidelines between lots two and 
three, four and five, gnd so on were run south astronomically to intersect the 
northerly boundary of/ the Township of Ware and also north astronomically to 
the north boundary of the township. On the side line between lots two and 
three, the widths of concessions two, three, four and five were laid off, each 
being made 80.00 chains and from these points the concession lines were run 
east to intersect the westerly boundary of the Township of Jacques. The lines 
between concessions two and three and concessions three and four were then 
run west astronomically to the west boundary of the township and the lines 
between concessions four and five and between ' concessions five and six were run 
west astronomically to intersect the high water line of Dog Lake. The north 
boundary of the township was run west astronomically from the north-west 
angle of the Township of Jacques to Dog Lake. As the line between concessions 
one and two which was used as a base to lay off the widths of the various lots 
does not run across the full twelve miles, the line in front of concession four 
was used as a base to lay off the widths of lot's nineteen, twenty, twenty-one 
and twenty-two, each of which was given 40.00 chains. The width of lot twenty- 
three was established by taking the distance below the westerly limit of lot 
twenty-two, as established above, and a line run by O.L.S. Fawcett, in 1907, 
as a trial line for the east boundary of Grand Trunk Pacific Block N'o. 1, the 
distance being 43.95 chains. The width of this lot in concession five and six 
was also made this distance. From the lot corners established, the side lines 
between lots twenty and twenty-one and between lots twenty-two and twenty- 
three were run ^uth astronomically to the south boundary of the township 
and north astronomically to the north boundary of- the township. On the line 
between lots twenty and twenty-one the depth of concession four was made 79.76 
chains and from here the line in front of concession five was run west astronomic- 
ally to the west boundary of the township. On the line between lots twenty-two and 
twenty-three the depths of concessions five and six were made 79.80 chains and 
79.50 chains respectively and from the points so estal)li^^hed lines were run west 
astronomically to thq west boundary of the township and the north boundary 
was run east astronomically to Dog Lake. It was noted that in running the 
north boundary east to the lake, that the line produced coincided exactly with 
that portion of the north l)oundary of the township east of Dog Lake. 

On several concession lines the widths of the odd numbered lots, with the 
exception of lot twenty-three, were made 40.00 chains. The width of lot twenty- 
three was established as explained above, the width being 43.95 chains. The 
widths of the even num])ered lots were established l)y the intersection of the 
side lines with the concession boundaries. The south boundary of the townsliip 
was re-chained and lot corners were established thereon. 

Substantial wooden posts <oi size and timber specified were planted to mark 
the angles of the lots. Bearing trees were marked and their position noted where 
timber was available. As in many places all the timber had been burned off 
many posts have no bearing trees. In most of these cases the posts were well 
mounded with stones. Iron posts were marked and planted at the points indicated 
on the projected plan accompanying your instructions. 



DO EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

In the case of the posts at the following corners : Lots nineteen and twenty, 
■concession two, lots five and six, concession three, lots seven and eight, concession 
four, lots five and six, concession five, and lots twenty-one and twenty-two, con- 
cession six, as these corners fell in bodies of water, posts were planted on the north 
shore of the bodies of water, in which they fell at points bearing north astronomic- 
ally from their proper positions on the concession lines and the distances were 
measured from the concession lines and noted in the field notes. A post was 
planted on the easterly shore of One Island Lake to indicate the position of the 
line between lots five and six, concession two, as this line is almost entirely in 
the lake. Lot fifteen, concession four, on the north side of Hawk Bay is made 
to include the portion of what would be lot sixteen to the west of it. The 
■easterly boundary of lot twenty-two, concession three, was made the Dog Eiver, 

A road allowance one chain in width was laid off around Dog Lake and Little 
Dog Lake and along both sides of the Dog Eiver. Posts to mark the corners of 
lots fronting on the lakes or in cases where an intersection was in the lake, were 
planted at the perpendicular distance of one chain from the high water line. 
On Dog Lake witness posts were planted in front of these and the surrounding 
trees, where there were any, were well blazed. 

The lines were well opened up and blazed. Observations were taken fre- 
-quently and will be found recorded in the field notes. The magnetic variation 
remained fairly constant at two degrees east but in places this was found to 
■vary to a considerable extent. 

A stadia traverse was made of all bodies of water in the township and field 
notes prepared of same on the scale of ten chains to an inch. On Dog Lake 
the position of the original shore line is shown as nearly as it is possible to do 
without taking soundings. This is shown as a dotted line in the field notes. 

TiMBEK. 

A timber plan of the .township accompanies this report. Over half of the 
timber has been destroyed by forest fires at different times. That portion of 
. the township east of One Island Lake is now grown up with jack pine, poplar 
and birch about twenty-five to thirty years old. In cases where fire has passed over 
in recent years the only timber of value now left is the spruce in the swamps. 
Of the timber not destroyed by fires nearly all of value has been cut. In the 
last year there have been four lumber camps operating within the township and 
I)y the ooming spring only small patches of good timber will be left. Eires 
occurred in two places during the progress of the survey. One of these was 
west of One Island Lake and the other was south and west of Dog Lake in con- 
cessions three and four. Neither of these fires was started by any members of 
our party. Another fire has passed over a small area along the Dog Eiver in 
lots twenty-three and twenty-four in concessions five and six, since the lines 
were run. None of these did any material damage. 

Soil. 

The southerly three concessions of the township are fairly good agricultural 
lands, there being between fifty per cent, and sixty per cent, good soil. This 
ranges from clay loam in the central portions to sandy loam on the easterly 
and westerly ends of the concessions. In the burned over area south of Dog 
Lake in concessions three and four, nearly all the timber is gone and this land 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OP LANDS AND FORESTS. 91 

could be cleared and made ready for crops in a very short time. It would make 
excellent grazing and hay lands. The northerly three concessions are very rough 
and broken and the soil is very stony and rocky, there being scarcely twenty per 
cent, of the land suitable for farming in these concessions. We do not think that 
it would be advisable to open these concessions for settlement at this time, though 
consider that the southerly three should l)e opened up. 

Minerals. 

There are numerous outcroppings of rock in the township, especially in the 
northern part of the east half, but no minerals of any value were noticed. The 
south-easterly part of the township has at one time been very thoroughly investi- 
gated for iron though none was found. There is a considerable overburden in 
most places. 

Topography. 

The hills surrounding Hawk Lake and Dog Lake are from one hundred to 
two hundred feet in height with tops inland from ten chains to twenty chains. 
'The northerly three concessions east of Dog Lake are rough and broken by hills 
from fifty to a hundred feet in height. The southerly three concessions are fairly 
level through lots one to fourteen. West of lot fourteen to Little Dog Lake and 
tlie Dog River in concessions one and two is very rough. A fairly level plateau 
is found in lots fifteen to twenty in concession three and this also extends into 
lots twenty and twenty-one in concession four. 

Lakes and Rivers. 

Several small lakes, not previously mapped, were found. The largest bodies 
of water in the township are Dog Lake, Hawk Lake and One Island Lake. The 
water in these is clear while that in some of the smaller lakes is of a dark colour. 
On Dog Lake the natural beauty of the lake has been destroyed by flooding. 
One Island Lake and the lakes to the east of it would make very desirable lakes 
for summer camping. The easterly part of the township nearly all drains directly 
or indirectly into Hawk Bay of Dog Lake. The source of Strawberry Creek is in 
the large swamp in lots nine, ten and eleven in concessions one and two. This 
flows south through the Township of Ware into the Kaministikwia River. 
Concessions one, two and three in lots thirteen to twenty are drained by three 
creeks into Little Dog Lake and the Dog River, In the returns of the survey 
of the Township of Jacques made by us One Island Lake as shown therein was 
improperly named. Since that time we have found that the lake generally known 
as " One Island '' 'is that shown on the plan of Fowler Township. Storage dams 
liave been built at the outlets of Hawk Lake, One Island Lake, and the small 
lake in lot ten, concession six. These are used to supply water to drive the 
creeks flowing out of them. The head in each case is about three feet. 

Dog River is not navigable above Little Dog Lake. From here there is a 
portage and tote road to Dog Lake, a distance of about a mile and three-quarters. 
The outlet of Hawk Lake can be run with a canoe in high water and the inlet 
of Spike Lake is always navigable for canoes. The outlet of the small lake in 
lot ten, concession six is now being improved for driving purposes. 



92 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Islands^ 

. Fifty-seven islands were found within tlie township. Tliese were lettered and 
numbered from J.K. 20 to J.K. 76. J.K. 20 is in Little Dog Lake, J.K. 21 to 
51 are in Dog Eiver. J.K. 52 and 53 and J.K. 55 to 71 are in Dog Lake. 
J.K. 54 is in Florence Lake^ J.K. 72 is in Bolduc Lake, J.K. 73 is in Kawene 
Lake. J.K. 74 is in Freed Lake. J.K. 75 is in Spike Lake and J.K. 76 is in 
One Island Lake. The areas of the islands are shown on the plan of the township. 
Many of them are very small, especially those in the Dog Eiver. Several of the 
islands in Dog Lake have been formed by raising the level of the lake. 

EOUTES, ETC. 

From Trout Lake, which is one mile south of the south-east angle of the 
township a tote road runs north-westerly to the south bay of One Island Lake. 
This road has been used for the last two winters for freighting in provisions and 
is also passable for waggons but will require considerable more improvement 
before it is fit for regular summer use. A winter road runs from the south- 
easterly corner of lot six, concession two, to connect with the road system in 
Ware Township. From the southerly boundary of the Township to Kaministikwia 
via this road is about twelve miles. Another road runs north from Kaministikwia. 
along the Dog Eiver to Little Dog Lake. This road is not improved for the two 
miles south of the township. In the township this road follows Little Dog Lake 
to the north end and here it branches and runs to Dog Lake. The portion 
between Little Dog Lake and Dog Lake can be used as a waggon road but the 
remaining part is too rough. A winter road branches off this road and runs 
across concession eight of Ware and enters Fowler in lot sixteen. It then swings 
east and north and is cut out to Hawk Bay. There is also a winter road running 
across One Island Lake to Hawk Bay, and on through lot eight in concession 
I'our, five and six to Dog Lake. A good trail that has once been used as a road 
runs from the north end of the portage from Little Dog Lake to Dog Lake to 
ihe dams at the outlet of the lake. Numerous tie roads were found in the 
i.eighbourhood of the small lakes in lots six, seven and eight in concessions five 
ind six also in lots five and ^ix in concessions one and two and in lots thirteen 
end fourteen in concessions one, two and three. 

Cleakings, Improvements, etc. 

There are several sets of lumber camps in the township. These are in lot 
ux, concession two (J. C. Greer), lot eight, concession five (J. Stirrett & Sons), 
lot seven, concession six (J. Stirrett & Sons) and in lots fourteen and fifteen, 
concession one (Jas. Hourigan & Co.). No other improvements than the build- 
ings were made around any of these camps. Two trappers' cabins were seen on 
One Island Lake. There is also a full set of camps in lot twenty-three, con- 
cession five. These were used by the contractors when the storage dams were 
being built but are now in poor condition. No squatters were found and no 
other improvements noted. 

Water Powers, etc. 

The fall between Dog Lake and Little Dog Lake is about three hundred 
feet. Many rapids and falls were found along the course of the river. Detailed 



1920-21 DEPAETME^^T OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 93 

investigations of these have been made by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
in 1913 and previously and more definite information than we can furnish could 
be obtained from them. 

Very few indications of game were noticed as the country has been hunted 
and trapped over for many years. The lakes are not well stocked with fish 
though some lake trout were caught in Hawk Lake. It might be advisable to 
stock One Island, Florence and Hawk Lakes with trout as they covdd be made 
\ery attractive grounds for fishing. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Phillips & Bennee, 
Per J. K. Benner, 



Ontario Land Surveyors. 



The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. SI. 



Survey op a Meridian Line and Traverse of That Portion of Dog Lake 
Lying North of the Township of Fowler, District of Thunder Bay. 

Port Arthur, Ont., April 30th, 1920. 

Sir, — We beg to report that in accordance with instructions issued from your 
Department dated September 30th, 1919, we have completed the survey of that 
portion of Dog Lake lying north of the Township of Fowler, in the District of 
Thunder Bay, and a meridian line across same. 

The traverse of Dog Lake was carried on in the winter months but a portion 
of the meridian was run in October last. 

This lake is about thirty miles north-west of the City of Port Arthur. Tlie 
route to it is via Dawson Eoad, thence along the boundary line betwee-n the 
Townships of Ware and Gorham to Trout Lake, thence north-westerly along a tote 
road to One Island Lake and then by canoe through One Island Lake and Hawk 
Lake. There is a winter road through Fowler Township to the bay of Dog 
Lake which enters lots nine and ten, concession six. 

The survey of the meridian was commenced at the north-west corner of 
lot twelve, concession six, Township of Fowler, and from this point a meridian 
was run north astronomically across the various points of land and bays to the 
last intersection with the northerly margin of the lake. This line was all chained 
in the winter and posted according to instructions. 

The traverse of the lake was commenced at the intersection of the north 
boundary of the Township of Fowler with the high water mark in lot thirteen, 
Concession six. Township of Fowler. Trees were marked at intervals of about 
one mile the numbers running from one to seventy-five. Eighty-tWo islands werQ 



94 EEPOET OF THE No. a 

found and surveyed within the portion of the lake covered by this report. These 
were lettered and numbered from J.K. 77 to J.K. 158 and on each island a tree- 
was marked with the initials and numbers of the island and these will be found 
recorded in the field notes of the survey. The traverse of the shore line wa& 
made with reference to the margin as defined when the dam of the Kaministiquia 
Power Co. at the outlet of the lake is full. At the time the survey was made 
the lake was nearly at its original level and the approximate position of the old 
shore line as shown in dotted lines on the plan should be fairly accurate. 

The greater portion of the margin of the lake is timbered with green forest, 
the most prevalent species being spruce. The west shore has been all burned 
off by forest fires that passed over the country about ten years ago. Lumbering 
operations are being carried on by John Stirrett and Sons on Timber Berth 1). 
and their camp is near Station 26 of the traverse. 

Few indications of game were noticed. The lake is poorly stocked with fish. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Phillips & Ben^ner, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 32. 
Traverse of Long Lake, District of Thunder Bay. 

Sault Ste. Marie, March 17th, 1920. 

Sir, — I beg to submit herewith the following report in connection' with the 
traverse survey of Long Lake, made by me i'A ?fie District of Thunder E>av, under 
instructions from your Department, dated July 22nd, 19f9. 

On receipt of these instructions preparations were immediately made. ]\Iy 
assistants were brought from the Garden River Indian Eeserve and the party 
left Sault Ste. Marie on the morning of July 30th, by the Algoma Central Railway 
via Oba arriving at Long Lake at midnight July 31st. 

We commenced our survey from a post planted on the north boundary of 
the Long Lake Indian Reserve No. 77, surveyed by O.L.S. Dobie in 19i0, We 
traversed the Canadian Northern Railway from this post, which was marked 
Post No. 1, to the north shore of Long Lake near the mouth of the Kenogami 
River. From here the stadia traverse of the lake was commenced, readings being 
taken at frequent intervals to show the irregularities of the shore line. 

At intervals of about a mile apart posts were made and carved on the side 
next the lake. These were generally made from standing trees and were marked 
with a knife as follows: T.l, T.2, etc., up to T.85. In every case these posts were 
carefully tied to transit points with transit and a chain as shown on the plan 
prepared of thi^ survey. ' 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 95 



Islands. 

All islands in the lake were located and traversed and marked by a square 
wooden post in a prominent place on the island. These posts were made where 
possible from standing trees and were carved with the letters G.L. 1, G.L. 2, up to 
G.L. 65, there being sixty-five islands in the lake ranging from a quarter of an 
acre up to 280 acres. The total water area of the lake was forty-nine square miles. 

TiMBEE. 

The timber along the shores of the lake is generally small and is not of 
value except as pulpwood. Spruce of fair size is found scattered along the shore. 
Thick growths of jack pine are numerous especially at the south end of the lake, 
where there are large stretches of sand and gravel. Poplar, balm of gilead, birch 
and balsam are also quite common. Cedar occurs in a number of places along 
the shore. 

Geology. 

The rock outcrops for the north eight miles of Long Lake are granite. A 
contact between this rock and the Keewatin occurs at the narrows about eight 
or nine miles south of the north end of the lake. From this point the rock is 
mostly a dark coloured mica schist extending for about ten or eleven miles. South 
of these schist outcrops granite occurs again. The south stretch of the lake, 
however, is heavily covered with sand and gravel. White quartz veins are fre- 
quently seen in the schist outcrops, these carry no economic value, according to 
samples taken by us which were afterwards assayed. The highest assay shown 
from our samples was $1.20 per ton in gold. 

Topography. 

The southern end of Long Lake is very rugged and mountainous. At one 
place a sheer rise from the water occurs of 360 feet. The contour of the country" 
however, gradually decreases toward the north, where it is quite low. This part 
of the lake is drift covered and the clay land is utilized for farming purposes. 
Only a very small area, however, is suitable for cultivation, this occurring at 
the extreme northern end of the lake. 

Game and Fish. 

Moose and caribou are quite plentiful around Long Lake and fur-bearing 
animals appear to be numerous, especially beaver. This lake is a splendid one 
for fish, lake trout, pickerel, pike and whitefish are all plentiful. Some of tlie 
small creeks flowing into the lake abound with brook trout. 

General Remarks. 

Long Lake is a remarkably fine lake for summer resort purposes. Good 
water, navigable for the full length of fifty-one miles, very easy of access, Long 
Lake Station on the Canadian Northern Railway being situated on the shore 
of the lake. Three stores are doing business here. Two of these were built 
in the year of 1919 and the Hudson's Bay Company post, which is about two 
miles from the station, has been in existence for over 100 years. The water 



96 REPOET OF THE No. 3 

elevation of Long Lake is 1,013 feet above sea level and the railway grade has 
an elevation of 1,031 feet. 

The field work on Long Lake was completed on October 2nd, and the party 
arrived in Sault Ste. Marie on October 4th, where they were paid off and disbanded. 

Accompanying this report is a plan on a scale of twenty chains to the inch, 
a list of the islands showing their area, etc. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) G. L. Eamsey, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Appendix No. 33. 
To Subdivide the Residue of the Township of Hanlan, District of Algoma. 

Bracebridge, November 20th, 1919. 

Sir, — Pursuant to your instructions dated the 15th April, 1919, I have sur- 
veyed the residue of the Township of Hanlan, consisting of the ninth to twelfth 
concessions, inclusive, similarly to the Township of Casgrain, that is the posting 
of the ninth concession, this line having been run by O.L.S. Angus, 1912, and 
the re-chaining and posting of Speight's base line, the front of the twelfth con- 
cession run in 1907, also the lakes Pushimi, Hanlan, Wolverine and Pivabiska, 
also the parts of these lakes in the Township of Bannerman, 

After completing the survey of the residue of the Township of Casgrain 
on the 3rd of September, 1919, I proceeded immediately to the adjoining Town- 
ship of Hanlan. The concession line between the tenth and eleventh concessions 
was run east and west astronomically from the side line between lots twelve and 
thirteen. 

The survey of the remaining lines was performed similarly to those in the 
Township of Casgrain, except that the side line between lots six and seven is the 
east limit of the road allowance, following Angus' survey, 1912. 

The lakes were surveyed by stadia traverse and ties were made to the inter- 
secting co'ncession and side lines. 

A basic triangulation was made of the larger expanses of water. Iron posts 
were planted at the intersection of the surveyed lines as shown in the field notes. 

General Features. 

This part of the township is broken very largely by lakes, so much so that 
there are very -few full lots in the concessions. " The country is throughout these 
concessions, fairly high compared with the general run of land in this section. 
It is covered chiefly with spruce, poplar, and birch, here and there, there are 
small muskegs :ar swamps. hvmi ,ci.>( 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS. 97 



Soil. 

The subsoil throughout is heavy clay covered on the high land with six 
inches of humus and on the lower land with from two feet to. six feet of moss. 

Generally speaking, there are few outcroppings of rocks except on the shores 
of the lakes. 

Timber. 

Spruce may be said to be the prevalent kind though there is very consider- 
able poplar. Spruce ranges from three to ten inches in diameter. The poplar 
averages from, three to eight inches. There are also birch, balsam and tamarac. 

Minerals. 

Except on the shores of the lakes which are for the most part rocky, there 
are few outcroppings of rock, and I submit herewith a sample which appears to 
be general throughout the township. Sample was taken at the intersection of the 
side lines between lots eighteen and nineteeji. 

There is no indication of any minerals. The rocks are igneous chiefly in 
the form of granite. 

Fish and Game. 

The lakes abound with fish, chiefly pickerel and pike. These have been 
caught up to twenty-five pounds. The game is plentiful. Moose abound in these 
regions. There axe few bear, no deer. On the lakes there are generally ducks 
in large numbers. 

Lakes and Rivers. 

The lakes form a considerable extent of these four concessions, and are 
connected as shown on the traverse plans. 

In Pivabiska Lake there are numerous islands. 

The shores of the lakes may be said to be very rocky and vary in height from 
ten to forty feet. 

There is a river flowing north-easterly into the junction of Hanlan and 
"Wolverine Lakes, which I deemed it advisable to survey. It averages II/2 chains 
in width almost up to the eighth concession. 

The survey was completed on October 15th, 1919, and the party discharged 
at Hearst on October 16th, 1919. It rained almost every day and this, together 
with the existing conditions of labour, I experienced great difficulty in keeping 
men. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient" servant, 

(Sgd.) W. A. SiBBETT, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Eonournhle, ilte Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

7 L.F. 



98 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Appendix No. 34. 
To Subdivide the Eesidue of the Township of Casgraix, District of Algoma. 

Beacebkidge, November 20th, 1919. 

SiR^ — Pursuant to your instructions dated the loth April, 1919, I have sur- 
veyed the residue of the Township. of Casgrain, that is the ninth to twelfth con- 
cessions inclusive, Pivabiska Lake and the Mattawishkhwia Eiver, and beg to 
report as follows: — 

I organized my party consisting of myself, two chainers, picket men, three 
axe men and a cook, at North Bay on the 29th July, 1919, and proceeded to 
Hearst, arriving there on the 31st, reaching the easterly limit of the ninth con- 
cession of Casgrain, by the Mattawishkhwia Eiver on August 2nd, where I com- 
menced my survey, which consisted of posting the front of the ninth concession 
(the line between the eighth and ninth concessions having been previously run 
by Coltham and Coltham, 1912) and running the line between the tenth and 
eleventh concessions, and the side lines between lots six and seven, twelve and 
thirteen, eighteen and nineteen, twenty-four and twenty-five north from the eighth 
concession, and the re-chaining and posting of Speight's base line, the north 
boundary of the township. 

I found the north boundary, this line Avhich had been run twelve years ago 
in a very bad shape through the entire township, owing to it being grown up 
with tag alders. I also surveyed the Mattawishkhwia Eiver. Pivabiska Lakes and 
three other small lakes, as shown on the accompanying plan. Iron posts were 
planted at the intersection of the surveyed lines as shown in the field notes. 

General Features. 

The four concessions of the township might be said to be chiefly muskeg 
covered, as usual, with small spruce and tamarac ranging from three to eight 
inches. Considerable portion of the higher land as shown on the plan has been 
burnt over, I should say, about thirty years ago, and is now covered with second 
growth of poplar and birch. West of Pivabiska Lake the land is somewhat higher 
than the general run, is slightly undulatihg, covered with poplar and birch. 

Soil, 

The subsoil throughout is heavy clay, covered on the muskeg with anywhere 
from two to six feet of moss, on the burnt areas with a few inches of humus. 
There is very little rock in evidence. 

Timber. 

The general run of timber is spruce in the muskegs together with some 
balsam and tamarac. The diameter ranges from three to eight inches. The^ 
higher land has poplar and birch as shown on the accompanying timber plan. 

Minerals. 

As stated there are few outcroppings of rock and I submit herewith, a sample 
which appears to be general throughout the township. The shores of Pivabiska 



1920-21 DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 99 

Lake are to a large extent rocky and the sample was taken from near the inter- 
section of this lake by the tenth and eleventh concessions. There are no indica- 
tions of any minerals, the rocks are igneous and chiefly a form of granite. 

Fish and Game. 

The large lakes and rivers abound with fish, chiefly pickerel and pike. The 
game is plentiful, moose abound in these regions. There are few bear, no deer. 
On the small lakes there are ducks in large numbers. 

Lakes and Rivers. 

Pivabiska Lake extends into the township through a narrows forming an 
expansion known as Bennet's Bay. The shores of the lake are rocky, the land 
rises anywhere from ten to fifteen feet around them. It is comparatively shallow, 
averaging fifteen feet deep. There are quite a number of shallow places and shoals 
of rocky boulders, which make it dangerous for navigation. 

The Mattawishkhwia River averages from two and a half to three chains 
wide. The banks are not high and are earthy and soft. The river is shallow and 
below the eighth concession to the east boundary of the township there are con- 
siderable rapids which hinder navigation at low water though the fall at each 
is not much. 

The river is navigable for good-sized canoes, heavily loaded, any place during 
high water. 

The survey was completed on September 3rd, 1919, and the party proceeded 
to the Township of Hanlan, adjoining on the west. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) W. A. SiBBETT, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendi-x No. 35. 

Survey of the Outlines of the Townships of MacVicar, Carmichael, 
Stringer, Ford, Hicks, Oke, Poulett and Aitken, District of 

Timiskaming. 

New Liskeard, Ont., August 3rd, 1920. 

Sir, — Under instructions from the Director of Surveys, dated May 12th, 
1920, our ]Vrr. Sutcliffe proceeded to Kakatush, which is at the Ground Hog 
River crossing of the old Canadian Northern Railway, on June 8th, and personally 
conducted the survey up to the time of its completion on July 12th. We went 
down the Ground Hog River about fifteen miles to the first portage across to 



IDO REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

the Nat River to which we crossed and followed to approximately the commence- 
ment point of our work. 

No serious obstacles were met with either on the journey in or during the 
work. Stellar observations were taken at the different points indicated in our 
field notes. The nine mile chords are not shown as east and west astronomically 
at, all points on the chord, but the true astronomic bearings have been calculated 
and noted in the field notes. The work was followed out in the order outlined 
in the instructions, and in all cases we satisfactorily checked in with previous 
surveys on the east and west sides. 

Instrument Work. 

Light Mountain Gurley transits were used on the work and Stellar observations 
were taken as often as possible. These observations were facilitated by the use 
of curves previously plotted in our office for the proper latitude and longitude of 
the work, a copy of which is enclosed with the field notes. Correction for time 
was made by observation several times. 

Chainage. 

Chains four hundred links long were used and slope distances M^ere taken when 
necessary and corrected with the use of a clinometer and slope tables. The 
tapes were properly tested and the chainers were duly sworn. - 

Posts and Bearing Trees. 

The most durable wood obtainable was selected for posts. We found the 
new type of iron posts fairly satisfactory where the ground was suitable, but we 
had a few instances where it was impossible to even place witness posts and 
mounds within reasonable distances from the points they were intended to witness. 
.When possible, small trees were marked for bearing -trees. The trees were 
chosen as nearly opposite one another as possible. 

Blazing of Lines. 

The picket man was held responsible for the l)lazing and the results obtained 
were satisfactory. 

Timber. 

With the exception of the Townships of MacVicar and Carmichael, the country 
was almost entirely covered by spruce bush with some balsam mixed through in 
places. Several muskegs were encountered, some of which were of considerable 
size. The north-west part of the Township of Poulett and the south-west part 
of Hicks is brule about thirty years old. In the vicinity of the streams the brule 
is covered by second growth poplar, whereas further back small spruce and alders 
have grown up. With the exception of the above mentioned townships the spruce 
timber is mostly small and suitable only foi; pulpwood, although along the south 
boundary of MacVicar some very good spruce was seen. 



1920-21 DEPAET^IEN^T OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 101 

In the two above mentioned townships, particularly in the vicinity of the 
Ground Hog River, considerable very large poplar was encountered. It was sound 
and of good quality. In this same area the spruce is also large. Balsam is 
plentiful and some birch was seen, but generally speaking, there is very little 
birch in this section. No pine of any description was seen. It was only along 
the south and east boundaries of MacVicar, the south boundary of Carmiehatl 
and along the Ground Hog River, north of the head of the Long Rapids, that we 
saw timber of any real importance. 

Water Courses. 

The Ground Hog and Nat Rivers were the only streams of importance. 
There are a few small creeks but surprisingly few. The country as a whole is 
very level. It was only in the immediate vicinity of the above mentioned rivers 
that there were any hills of consequence. It was only on the south boundary 
of Oke that any lakes were seen. 

Rock Formation. 
Only along the rivers in the vicinity of rapids was any rock seen. 

Agriculture. 

The soil is almost entirely a good clay but will require extensive drainage 
to be of use for farming. 

Animal Life. 

Moose are very plentiful. Fur-bearing animals are also very numerous. 
The principal fish in the Ground Hog River are sturgeon, pickerel and pike, all 
of which are fairly plentiful. 

Water Powers. 

The only water power of importance is that surveyed by us in 1911 as W.P. 9, 
report of which was filed by us at that time. 

Accompanying this report are a general plan on mounted paper, a timber 
plan on tracing linen and the usual field notes. 

We have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) SUTCLIFFE & NeELANDS, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 

llie Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



10'2 KEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Appendix No. S6. 
Survey of Certain Township Outlines in the District of Thunder Bay. 

NiPiGON, Ont., August 1st, 1920. 

SiR^ — I beg to submit herewith a detailed report on the survey of certain 
township outlines in the District of Thunder Bay, said townships lying north of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, and adjoining the boundary line between the Dis- 
tricts of Thunder Bay and Algoma, said survey having been performed by me 
under instructions dated Toronto, May 12th, 1920. 

Pursuant to instructions, I commenced my survey at an iron post planted 
by O.L.S. Stewart on the line between Townships seventy and seventy-one at the 
north-west angle of Township seventy, said point being also the north-east angle 
of Township seventy-one, and being 126 chains 47.9 links north of the centre 
line of the C. P. R. The meridian and base lines were run pursuant to instruc- 
tions with the exception of the section of the first base line which forms the 
boundary between the Township of Atikameg and Bryant, which line was run 
from east to west, due to the position of White Lake. (See plan.) 

The several lines were well cut out and well blazed — one man devoting his 
entire time to the blazing. All posts, iron and wooden, were correctly marked 
and planted, and the bearing trees taken wherever possible. Few cairns of stones 
were planted about posts as the country was, for the most part, sandy, and few 
stones could be found for this purpose. Particular care was given to the correct 
marking and planting of the iron posts, the digging of pits and making of mounds. 

Frequent astronomical observations were taken, the notes of which accompany 
the field notes. I personally took the notes on the timber and soil, the chainmen 
doing the actual chaining only. While on the survey, I personally covered a 
considerable area on either side of each surveyed line to ascertain the size and 
extent of the timber, being particularly impressed with the large areas of spruce 
and banksian pine in the townships. 

I beg to state that your instructions were closely adhered to in every respect. 
Before takifig up in detail the timber, soil, etc. — may I advise you that I have 
been informed by reliable parties that the country to the north and to the west 
of these townships is well timbered, that the areas of spruce and banksian pine 
extend in these directions, particularly to the north, and that good water routes 
exist whereby such timber may be driven and brought out. If it is the intention 
of the Department to lay out additional townships for the sale of the timber 
therein, may I suggest that this territory be investigated before doing so? 

Timber. 

Throughout the six townships excellent spruce was found, running from 
four to ten inches in diameter. There are large areas that will yield from 
twenty-five to thirty cords to the acre. It is impossible to note here the location 
of these areas, they exist throughout the entire six townships. Reference to the 
field notes and timber plan will give the locations of the best of this spruce. 
The Townships of McGill, Atikameg and Mikano are the best for spruce timber. 

Banksian pine is found throughout all six townships in large amounts, excel- 
lent tie timber size. The Austin Nicholson Co., of Chapleau, under permit in 
previous years, has taken tie timber out from the Townships of Atikameg, Bryant 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LAJ^DS AND FOEESTS. 103 



and Flood, but not to any considerable extent. They have merely touched the 
fringe of it. They have camps at present on the meridian line between the 
Townships of Bryant and Flood. Last winter through a sub-contractor this 
company cut 87,000 ties but were unable to get their drive out. They are at 
present erecting a new dam in an endeavour to get their ties out this summer, 
Ko attempt has been made to burn or dispose of the slash and there is grave 
fire menace through the several townships on this account, especially as there 
are Indians, trappers and tourists continually passing through, and camping in, 
this area. Two rather serious fires were burning in this area during the progress 
of the survey, fires which I personally investigated and found not to have been 
started near, or caused by my survey camps. 

Xo adequate and complete report is possible on the extent of the banksian 
pine in these townships without a careful cruise- being made. The townships 
are all exceptionally well timbered with banksian pine running from six to 
eighteen inches in diameter. I was particularly impressed with the possibilities 
for a sawmill to be located near the north-east angle of the Township of Bryant. 
Excellent roads could be made, several are actually in existence, out to the C. P. E. 
siding at Bremner. In view of. the scarcity of, and high prices for, lumber in 
this district, I beg to suggest that, if these townships are put up for tender, a 
clause be included compelling the erection and operation of such a mill. 

Aside from the spruce and banksian pine, there is very little other timber 
in the townships. There is some large poplar and a little cedar but not in 
amounts to be of commercial value. Very little balsam was found and the birch, 
although frequently mentioned in my field notes, was in areas small in extent 
and of little value. 

Soil. 

The soil throughout the six townships was sandy with occasional rocky areas 
and frequent small areas of muskeg. The areas near the Shabotik Eiver and in 
some other places near lakes or rivers was exceptionally good but these townships 
cannot be considered as good for agriculture, certainly not for settlement pur- 
poses. The value is to be found in the timber and in the timber alone. 

Game. 

The country is overrun with moose, and in the southerly two townships, red 
deer. Partridges were exceptionally plentiful. Pike are found in all of the large 
lakes. Fishing operations, under permit, are now being carried on in White 
Lake — the main catch being whitefish. 

EOADS. 

The only roads through the townships are tote roads leading from the C. P. E. 
to the several tie camps and connecting the said camps. These roads are shown 
on the field notes. The entire country is very level, with the exception of the 
southerly part of the Township of Flood. Eoads can easily and cheaply be built 
for logging operations in almost any part of the areas covered by this survey. 

Minerals. 

There were no minerals at all to be found on this survey. The rock, where 
it was encountered, was (jranite. 



104 RE POET OF THE Xo. 3 



Lakes and Eivers. 

As shown on the plan, White Lake and its connecting chain of lakes, form 
a water boundary to the west of the Townships of Bryant, Atikameg and McGill. 
This is a well travelled route, portages being short and well cut out. There are 
many lakes throughout the , townships, all of clear, excellent water, with sandy 
shores. White Lake has rocky shores for the most part. This lake extends to 
Mobert and the Hudson's Bay Company post at that point on the C. P. E. 

The Shabotik Biver crosses the Townships of Shabotik, Mikano and Atikameg 
m a general south-westerly direction. This is a wide, well travelled river, although 
Gum Creek, one of its tributaries, shown to be a well travelled river on existing 
maps, is impassable by canoes, being filled with log jams. For the information of 
cruisers, or others wishing to investigate these townships, I would suggest starting 
from Mobert and paddling up White Lake to the line between Atikameg' and 
Bryant. The Townships of Bryant and Atikameg could be covered in that way. 
McGill could be covered by following the chain of lakes on to the north of White 
Lake. Shabotik and Mikano can best be covered by paddling up the Shabotik 
Eiver on its north and south branches respectively. Flood could be reached 
by paddling up White Eiver from the old, not the present, station of Bremner, 
or by taking one of the two existing tote roads that come out to the C. P. E. 
near mile eighteen on that railway. Should more detailed information be desired 
re the several routes for reaching the townships, I will be glad to supply same. 

In conclusion, I beg to state that your instructions have been carefully 
followed in respect to the survey of these townships. I have put special attention 
upon the notes of the timber. I was particularly impressed with the great value 
of the spruce and banksian pine. I beg to enclose herewith plan and field notes, 
timber plan, astronomical observations, etc., etc., covering the entire work. Trust- 
ing that my work and this report upon the same will be found to be satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sg.) M. E. Crouch, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 37. 



Survey of Kashaweogama and Island Lakes, in the Districts of Thunder 

Bay and Kenora. 

Thessalgn, December 1st, 1920. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions dated February 28th, 1920, I 
have made a survev of Kashaweogama and Island Lakes, in the Districts of 
Thunder Bay and Kenora, and beg to submit the following report. 

I left home on the 9th March accompanied by one man and was joined by 
five men, according to arrangement at Sault Ste. Marie that evening. The 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AXD FOEESTS. 105 

following morning I proceeded to Sioux Lookout via Franz and Fort William, 
and after securing there what was needed to complete my outfit, I proceeded to 
Bucke, where I arrived about two o'clock on the morning of Sunday, March 14th. 

Word had been sent to Mr. A. H. A. Eobinson, of the Department of Mines, 
Ottawa, to meet me in Bucke on Monday, March 15th, and he arrived on that 
date, his train being some hours late. I secured the services of a couple of local 
Indians with dog teams, to help move the outfit and supplies to the starting 
point of the survey, and found their help of great assistance, as even with their 
help, it was necessary to make two trips with the outfit. We found a very good 
trail as far as Lake Savant, where we branched ofi: to the west, through a series 
of small lakes to Kashaweogama Lake. It was Friday afternoon, March 19th, 
before we were ready to start the actual survey.. I had hoped to obtain an 
observation before starting, but cloudy weather prevented this, so a start was 
made from an assumed meridian on the morning of Saturday, March 20th. 
Fortunately, I was able to get an observation on Polaris early on Saturday even- 
ing, and corrected my bearings. 

From this point on, the survey was carried on with all possible speed, as it 
was realized that the season was late, and the work had to be rushed in order to 
get out before the ice became too bad. We were held up occasionally for short 
intervals by stormy weather, and once just after we started, by a couple of hot 
days followed by rain, which took all the snow off the ice. The surface of the 
lake became so slippery that it was almost impossible to stand, and there was from 
four to six inches of water all over the lake. This, however, did not last long. 
For the most part, the weather conditions were good for the work, and the tem- 
perature continued low, so that the ice was still firm when we finished the survey 
on the afternoon of April 27th. During the last week we made it a point to 
be at work by daylight, in order to take advantage of the good walking in the 
early morning. 

We started for the railway early on the morning of April 28th, and the trip 
out took two days. Considerable difficulty was encountered on account of the 
snow having nearly disappeared on the portages. Some of these were filled with 
fallen timber, so that our toboggans and snowshoes suffered severely, so much 
so that they were nearly all abandoned when we reached the railway. The ice 
on the lakes was quite firm, but some difficulty was experienced in getting on 
and off the ice as it was getting bad close to the shore. 

The work on the survey was carefully done, all angles being measured with a 
transit, and the main traverse lines being measured with a Fice chain steel tape. 
The bearings were checked frequently by astronomical observations. The details 
of the shore line were measured with .stadia rods, these measurements being 
taken close enough together to show all details of the shore line. At intervals 
of about a mile, a prominent tree was squared and marked with the letter "B " 
followed by the number of the tree in Roman numerals. Each island bad a tree 
squared and marked in the same manner, except that trees on the islands were 
marked "I, No. — " followed by the number of the island in Roman numerals. 
These trees were all recorded in the notes, the bearings to them from the various 
transit stations being measured with a transit, and the distances with a steel tape. 

The magnetometric survey which was to be carried on in connection with the 
shore line survey, was attended to by Mr. A. H. A. Robinson, of the Department 
of Mines, Ottawa, and this work was carefully and accurately done. The cross 
sections where the magnetic measurements were made, were laid off witli a transit 

8 L.F. 



106 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 



and the distances chained. Soundings were taken where considered necessary, 
and the taking of these proved to be rather a laborious operation, as the ice in 
places was forty-two inches thick. As the area over which the magnetic survey 
was to be made did not extend much more than half way down Kashaweogama 
Lake, it was not necessary to continue this work any further, and Mr. Robinson 
left for home on March 31st, his work being done. Before he left I supplied 
him with a copy of my traverse bearings and distances, and such other information 
as was necessary for him to make a proper report, and I understand that his 
report has been filed in your Department some time ago. 

There is not much to add to this report, as the timber and the geological 
features were reported on by Mr. Henry Bell, and by Professor Parsons, respec- 
tively, who accompanied me on the survey of the boundary between the Districts 
of Thunder Bay and Kenora in 1919. I might say in passing, however, that a 
very large portion of the territory adjacent to these lakes, as well as many of the 
islands in them, have been overrun by fire within recent years, and the timber 
destroyed. The result is that the greater portion of the country presents a most 
desolate appearance. The shores are mostly rocky, and the prevailing rocks are 
green schists and other rocks of Keewatin age. There is a short stretch of river 
between Kashaweogama and Island Lakes in which there is a fall of about three 
or four feet, which is passed by a portage on the north side about six or seven 
chains long. All of the waters of these lakes goes out via Dog River which 
leaves the west end of Island Lake. = 

The notes of the survey have all been plotted on cross section paper, on a 
scale of ten chains to an inch. Tracings of this plan in two parts, one showing 
Kashaweogama Lake, and the other showing Island Lake, have already been sent 
to your Department. These tracings show all the information that was obtained 
during the progress of the survey. 

On account of having to get ready to start for Lake St. Joseph as soon as 
possible after the completion of the field work of this survey, it was not possible 
to complete the plans and other returns earlier in the season. 

Accompanying this report, are a copy of my diary, time book, together with 
my pay sheets and accounts in triplicate, and I trust that you will find everything 
satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) James S. Dobie, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AXD FOEESTS. 107 

Appendix No. 38. 

Eeport of the Survey op Certain Township Outlines North of the 
Canadian Pacific Eailway, in the District of Sudbury. 

South Porcupine, December 1st, 1920. 

Sir, — I have the honour, in accordance with your instructions to me dated 
May 11th, 1920, to submit the following report on the survey of certain township 
outlines, north of the Canadian Pacific Eailway in the District of Sudbury. 

On August 19th, my party arrived at the Woman Eiver Station on the 
C. P. E., and the following morning proceeded down the river an approximate 
distance of four miles to the point where it intersects the meridian run by 
O.L.S. Speight in 1909. From this point part of the party proceeded north 
along this meridian to the twelve mile post, the starting point of the survey; 
the other members of the party proceeded down the river with supplies to be 
cached at or near the place where the 1st base line would cross the river. 

The survey which commenced on August 26th was conducted throughout 
in strict accordance with your instructions. The base lines were run as chords 
of parallels of latitude, passing through the township corners. The east limits 
and west limits of townships were run north astronomically. Frequent observa- 
tions were taken on Polaris, the notes of which accompany the other returns. In 
chaining, a clinometer was used at all times, and horizontal distances deduced 
from the measured slope. Distances across obstructions were measured by offset 
or triangulation. Many magnetic observations were taken, and the results thereof 
are shown in the field notes. The lines were well cut out and blazed, and posts 
of the specified varieties of wood were planted where required. Iron posts of 
the standard pattern, shipped by you to Woman Eiver Station, were planted, 
and the necessary pits, mounds and trenches constructed as called for in your 
instructions. 

Unusually low water in the streams this season made transportation difficult, 
but this was more than offset by the ideal weather, conditions. 

Soil. 

The country through which the lines passed is mostly rough and hilly, but 
in small tracts undulating, and can hardly be classed as agricultural. The soil, 
except in the swamps and valleys, consists of a few inches of leafy loam and 
twelve to eighteen inches of sand and clay on bed rock, as a rule. The swamps 
like all others of Northern Ontario, have varying depths of moss and muskeg. 

Timber. 

Approximately the western half of Dore and Garnet appear to have been 
burnt over about six years ago, and the ground is now covered with semi-decayed 
fallen timber, and a new growth of small poplars and birches. The remaining 
portion of the territory, except in small strips along streams and lakes, apparently 
had been burnt over about thirty years ago, and is now covered with a thick 
growth of healthy timber, large areas of which is pulpwood size. A few white 
and red pines survived the fires and are now thriving, apparently. The varieties 
of timber are spruce, balsam, white birch, poplar and banksian pine on the high 
laiid<, and cedar, small tamarac and black ash on the low lands. 



108 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Minerals. 

The greater part of the rock throughout the country is granite and green- 
stone. Many small stringers of quartz were observed, but no large veins. Small 
stringers of hematite were noted in several places along the line between Heenan 
and Teuton Townships, but are not likely of any economic importance. 

Watek Powers. 

There are three small water powers on the Ridout River within the limits 
of the land surveyed, and one larger power, but in a dry season like this the 
amount of power that could be developed would be almost negligible. 

The water in all lakes and streams is clear and pure. 

Game. 

Large and small fur-bearing animals were numerous. Beaver work was 
seen in or along nearly all lakes and streams, and there were many indications 
of timber wolves, fox, lynx, fisher, otter and bear. Moose were very plentiful, 
and a few indications of red deer were observed. Partridge of different varieties 
were very plentiful, also. The lakes and streams contain pike, pickerel, trout, 
and whitefish. 

I am submitting with this report a general township plan, a timber plan, 
field notes, account in triplicate and the required affidavits. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Chas. V. Gallagher, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable, ike Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 39. 



Survey of the North Seventy-eight Miles of West Boundary of Nipigon 

Forest Reserve and Production Thereof North to Whitewater 

Lake, District of Thunder Bay. 

Port Arthur, Ont., October 13th, 1920. 

Sir, — We beg to report that in accordance with your instructions dated 
May 18th, 1920, we have completed the survey of the meridian forming the west 
boundary of the Mpigon Forest Reserve, a'nd produced it north to intersect the 
south shore of Whitewater Lake. 

A copy of the map of the Geological Survey of the Department of Mines, 
Ottawa, is enclosed showina; our route coming from Whitewater Lake to the 
National Transcontinental Railway. A copy of this map and one furnished by 



1920-21 DEPAKTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 109 

your Department were used by our supply men this summer and they report that 
they found them substantially correct. As shown on the map there is another 
route to Whitewater Lake from Outlet Bay on Smoothrock Lake by which it 
would appear to be easier to get to the end of our line, but was not used by us 
as we did not move farther north than the south-west bay of Whitewater Lake. 
Our route strikes the railway at a point about two and one-quarter miles east 
of Collins Station, the track passing over the last lake on the route, from the 
end of this lake a portage may be made into Trout Lake, Collins being only a 
short distance from the west end of this lake. From Gnome Lake, shown on the 
map to the track, the route appears to be different from that on the map, there 
are three portages from the track to Gnome Lake which is easily recognized and 
from this point the route is as shown on the map. There is said to be a route 
without portages from the south end of Tamarac Lake to the track but we were 
unable to find it. 

The survey was commenced at the iron post planted at the north-west angle 
of the Black Sturgeon Timber Limit and run north astronomically ninety-four 
miles, twenty-four chains and twenty-two links to the south shore of Whitewater 
Lake, crossing the Canadian National Railway at fifty-eight miles, four chains 
and ninety-eight and four-tenths links. Observations were taken at sufficient 
intervals to keep the line within the specified limits. The normal magnetic 
variation was zero degrees. Iron and wooden posts were planted as directed 
in the instructions in regard to same. In some cases where it was not found 
possible to dig pits and make mounds on account of rock and boulders, where an 
iron post was to be planted, and it did not appear that any better conditions 
would prevail for a considerable distance, the iron post was set in place but the 
pits and mounds were omitted, such points are shown in the field notes. 

The soil for the most part is sandy, a very large proportion of the country 
being a boulder bottom. In the south fifteen miles spruce swamps are the most 
prominent feature, there is some clay and clay loam land between these swamps 
but these areas are not large. Through the last twenty-five miles there is con- 
siderable of the rock and swamp typical of this part of the country. 

Up to the thirty-fifth mile the country passed through is well timbered, 
spruce being the principal species, a large proportion of the trees are up to 
twenty-eight inches in diameter. There is also good jack pine in this section 
although not as plentiful as the spruce, about eighteen inches in diameter is' 
the limit for this timber. There is a good stand of jack pine about one mile 
across north and south just north of the Gull River. There is also in this area 
l)irch up to sixteen inches, poplar to eighteen inches and balsam to eighteen 
inches, a few scattered white pine were seen on the seventeenth mile. From 
the thirty-fifth mile north the timber has for the most part been burnt or else 
is too small to have any value. There are a few spots shown on the timber plan 
where there is timber of good size, there are also small isolated areas, principally 
swamps in the stretches shown as burnt which are green. 

The rock formation seen was almost uniformly granite; no minerals were 
soon. 

No water powers of any magnitude were met with, although the supply men 
>tate that there is a big fall in the Gull River a few miles west of the line. 

Throughout the .whole line moose were plentiful and in some parts deer 
lid caribou were seen, the latter notably in the region of Caribou Lake. Fish, 



110 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



except pike, were not found to be plentiful in any of the lakes or rivers except 
Clearwater Lake and this appeared to be well stocked with trout. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd.) Phillips & Benner, 



The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Ontario Land Surveyors. 



Appendix No. J^O. 
739 Broadview Ave., Toroxto, Ont., October 29th, 1920. 

Sir, — Acting under instructions received July ITth, 1920, from the Depart- 
ment of Lands, Forests and Mines to accompany the Canadian Aero Film Co. in 
their flight to James Bay, I kept in touch with the said company to ascertain 
their date of departure. In due course I was informed that the plane would 
leave Hamilton, Monday, July 19th, 1920, so I left Toronto on that date in 
company with Mr. Fred Griffin, arriving at Cochrane on the following evening. 

The plane on a trial trip Monday had an accident that was more serious 
than was first supposed, and so did not reach Lillibelle Lake, which is two miles 
north of Cochrane, until Wednesday afternoon, August 11th, 1920. 

The party consisted of Mr. Irwin Proctor, President of the Canadian Aero 
Film Co., Capt. Eoy Maxwell, pilot, George Doan, mechanic, Jack Hyde, rigger, 
Roy Tash, cameraman, H. M. Blake, of the Ontario Government ]\Iotion Picture 
Bureau, Fred Griffin, of the Toronto Star }^^eTch/, and myself. 

The plane used on the expedition was a HS2L Curtiss-built seaplane, having 
a maximum speed horizontal flight of eighty-five miles per hour and a consumption 
of gasoline of thirty gallons per hour, full open. 

Abitibi Trip. 

On August 13th a trip was made from Lillibelle Lake north and east of the 
Abitibi Eiver down towards New Post. 

Observations from the plane showed that the country lying for fifty miles east 
of the Abitibi Eiver almost as far as New Post was dotted Avith small grassy 
lakes varying in size from one hundred to two thousand feet in length. Lakes 
of the same size were also noticed on the west bank, but numbering only about 
one-third those on the east bank. The lakes were general as far as the eye 
could see. 

The area east of the Abitibi Eiver and extending from the junction of the 
Frederick House and the Abitibi Eiver north to near New Post was a dense 
unbroken forest, mostly spruce (eighty per cent.), some tamarac, and very little 
birch and poplar. About four per cent, of the area was water. No burnt areas 
Were seen. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. Ill 

On the west side of the Abitihi River the forest was more broken being about 
twenty per cent, bald rock, two per cent, water, fifty per cent, spruce and the 
rest birch and poplar. This area differs from the east side of the Abitibi River, 
being dotted with patches of larger spruce of timber size (about fifteen per 
cent, of the spruce). 

Small creeks running into the east bank of the Abitibi down which logs 
could be driven were fairly numerous. 

A number of moose were seen on the shores of the lakes from the plane 
during the flight. 

On account of the narrowness of Lillibelle Lake we missed the tops of the 
trees by about five feet while taking off for the Abitibi flight. As this had 
happened with the plane not fully loaded, Capt. Maxwell decided that Lillibelle 
Lake was too dangerous for a base. A scouting party left the next day on a 
gasoline jigger west from Cochrane on the Canadian National Railway to find 
a more suitable spot. Remi Lake, three miles north of Moonbeam Station, was 
decided on as the best possible place for a base. Our supplies were then shipped 
to ^loonbeani and carted into a clearing on the north shore of Remi Lake where 
camp was pitched. The plane flew over light, taking one hour and thirty minutes. 

Captain Maxwell reported finding a number of burnt areas for the first 
twenty miles. The next twenty miles he met a series of small lakes running 
north and south. There were also rock outcroppings with many patches of beavor 
meadow; the rest of the country passed over being thickly wooded with spruce 
of pulpwood size. Some eight or ten miles from the railroad along the Ground 
Hog River fire had swept both banks eating into a depth of two and a half miles 
on the west bank. 

Remi Lake District, 

A number of short trips were made to test the machine, get a general idea 
of the country and take pictures. 

The ground was slightly undulating around Remi Lake and thickly wooded 
with about sixty-five per cent, spruce, the rest being hemlock, balsam, birch, 
poplar and cedar. The poplar and birch were in patches with long thin lines 
extending into the spruce areas. On account of the poplar and birch being a 
light green they were easily distinguished from the spruce which is a very dark 
green. 

Captain ^laxwell with his mechanic left on August ITth with the intention 
of caching some gasoline ahout half way to James Bay, in order to have sufficient 
to enable them to return to Remi Lake should the plane meet a storm or strong 
southerly wind on the trip back. 

On the trip down they were unable to find a suitable spot to land so went 
right through to Moose Factory leaving thirty gallons of gasoline at the Revillion 
Freres' post there. They returned the following day, leaving the next day to cache 
thirty gallons of gasoline on a lake about twenty-five miles north of Remi Lake, 
which they had seen on the previous trip. This was done as a precaution against 
a forced landing through lack of fuel, 

Mattagami-Moose Trip, 

On August 27th we left for Moose Factory from Remi Lake. The country 
passed over^just after leaving Remi Lake was very thickly wooded, with a few 
lakes. The trees were mostly spruce (about sixty-five per cent.) the rest being 



U3 REPOET OF THE No. 3 



tamarac, balsam, poplar, birch and balm of gilead. We travelled in a northerly 
direction, passing over three lakes on only one of which we could land, until we 
reached the Kapuskasing Eiver. All this country which we came over and as 
far as we could see was densely wooded, about sixty-five to seventy-five per cent, 
of the trees being spruce of pulpwood size with patches of larger spruce of timber 
size (about fifteen per cent, of the spruce) among them. These could be dis- 
tinguished as we were travelling at a height of 1,200 feet. The day being hot 
there was a heat haze which made the horizon quite indistinct and of a brownish 
colour. About forty miles north of Remi Lake and east of Devil's Eapids there 
were five lakes. They were too small to land on and take off again with any 
degree of safety. About fifty miles from Eemi we first met muskeg. It was 
only in small patches, the rest of the country being well wooded. As we proceeded 
up the Mattagami the country on the east side was well wooded with spruce 




Forced landing on Mattagami River. 

although patches of poplar and birch, some of them being about two miles long, 
also showed. On the west bank it was also well wooded but gradually as we 
proceeded north the patches of muskeg became larger, until about fifteen miles 
south of the junction of the Missinaibi and Mattagami Elvers where again it 
became thickly wooded with spruce, tamarac, poplar and birch, and extended north 
CO the junction. 

Just previously to crossing O.L.S. Speight's line, which could be seen quite 
clearly from the air, and lying west of the river were six lakes of considerable 
size, the largest being about twelve square miles. 

About twenty miles south of the junction of the Missinaibi and Mattagami 
Eivers along the east bank of the Mattagami. there was a strip of muskeg about 
one-half mile wide extending northerly eight or ten miles, which had the appear- 
ance of an old river basin. Beyond the muskeg it was well wooded as far as the 
west bank of the Abitibi Eiver. 



» 



1920-21 DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 113 

Along the Moose River it was fairly weir wooded near the banks, but beyond, 
TO the west, there was nothing but muskeg wooded with scrubby spruce and 
tamarac. At the junction of the Abitibi and the Moose, and between the rivers, 
it was thickly wooded mostly with spruce, some of good size, tamarac, poplar and 
birch. It is here that the Hudson Bay Company get the timber that they use in 
their mill, some of the white spruce being about two feet in diameter (see photo- 
graph No. 19). At the mouths and along the Kwataboahegan and French Rivers 
It was thickly wooded with spruce, tamarac, poplar and birch. 

The Mattagami River was very dry and the shoals could be easily seen ; for 
miles the rocks showed up bleached and white, while down the centre of the bed 
was a small stream of water. 

The islands at the mouth of the Moose River were thickly wooded. 

One thing noticeable was the absence of streams of any size emptying into 
the main rivers; nor were there any lakes visible. 

There were no burnt areas noticed. 

The visibility was rather poor on this trip on account of the heat haze 
before mentioned, which in the distance gave things a brownish tint. 

The difference in elevation between Remi Lake and James Bay was 925 
feet. This was checked on the five trips. 

The Shores of James Bay. 

It was observed on the trips along the shores of James Bay both to the east 
and to the west that the character of the coast was extremely low and flat. 
At low tide a mile or more of mud is left bare. Photographs Nos. 36, 37 and 
38 show this very plainly. They were taken about half tide. 

A muskeg wooded in patches with scrubby spruce, tamarac and alder ran 
for at least fifty miles back from the shore. There were no large water eourses 
we could follow to enable us to go further inland, neither were there lakes on 
which we could land in order to examine the country. 

On the trip along the shore to Hannah Bay countless wild geese and ducks 
were seen. They looked very small below us, giving a black and white wave 
effect, as they flew in towards the swamps. Hannah Bay is a wonderful breeding 
place for these geese and ducks, and the Indians go there from Moose Factory 
returning with boat loads full of these birds. They cook and pour lard on them 
which keeps them until they are needed in the winter time. 

The channels leading into James Bay at the mouth of the Moose River are 
very shallow with numerous bars and shoals. (See photographs 31, 32, 33 
and 34.) 

The steamer used by the Hudson's Bay Company to carry goods from the 
Charlton Islands, drawing six to eight feet, cannot cross the bars at the mouth 
of the Moose River at low tide. 

Climate at Moose Factory is generally more moderate than at Remi Lake, 
not having such extreme temperatures. At Remi Lake, August 22nd, after a 
hot day we had quite a heavy frost at night, the next day again being hot, while 
at Moose Factory there had been no signs of a frost, but sudden changes have 
been known to take place when the wind changed from a southerly to a northerly 
direction, the temperature dropping as much as forty degrees in half an hour. 

On Moose Island, potatoes, cauliflower, ])eets, carrots, turnips, etc., are grown, 
as well as hay, oats and Avheat. The oats and wheat do not always ripen but 



Hi EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

this year, owing to favourable weather conditions, they ripened about September 
10th. 

Eevillon Freres' post on the mainlaijid is built on a muskeg which has been 
drained. They can grow potatoes, but of a poorer quality than those on Moose 
Island. They get a good crop of hay. If the moss were burned off and the flats 
drained it would make good soil for hay and grazing purposes. 

The soil on the islands at the mouth of the Moose Eiver is very rich owing 
to its being of delta formation. These often escape frosts that occur on the main- 
.land. Therefore, the quality and quantity of the produce grown on Moose Island 
should not be taken as a criterion of the possibilities of the mainland in this 
neighbourhood. 

The rivers were very shallow this year and canoes going up to the railroad 
had to be poled for miles. The rocks shown in photographs Nos. 6, 21, 22 and 
24 in ordinary years are covered by water. 

In all five trips were made from Eemi Lake to Moose Factory carrying 
four passengers and baggage as well as one hundred gallons of gasoline to use 
on the flights along the shores of James Bay. All gasoline that we used on our 
trips from Moose Factory had to be transported there by the seaplane. 

The trip from Eemi Lake to James Bay was very trying. The pilot generally 
had to rest for a few hours after making each flight. It was also dangerous, 
there were so few places where the plane could land with safety. Had the rivers 
been, anything like their size during the flood season there would have been many 
suitable landing places. 

The weather was exceptionally hot, causing a peculiar state of horizon. A 
bush fire was raging near New Post and a number of small fires were burning 
near Eemi Lake. For days the smoke hung over the land delaying our departure. 
At Moose Factory the fog and mist, which came in with the tide, were also 
another cause of delay. In the middle of a hot calm day it was difficult to gain 
height and the air was exceedingly bumpy, making travelling very uncomfortable. 

I would suggest on any future flights, in order to make extensive journeys 
through the unexplored regions around James and Hudson Bays, that the trip 
be planned far enough ahead so that a supply of gasoline could be landed at 
James Bay by boat or floated down the Albany by scow in the spring. As will 
be noticed from the description of the plane, thirty gallons of gasoline is con- 
sumed per hour, thus a considerable quantity of fuel would have to be cached 
on James Bay in order to carry on the extensive operations which the country 
warrants. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) E. T. IRESOX, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 115 

Appendix Xo. Jfl. 

QUETICO PROVINCIAL PARK. 

Superintendent's Report. 

Kawene P.O., November 2ik1, 1930. 

The Honourable, the Minister of Lands and Forests, 

Toronto, Ontario. __ 

Honourable Sir, — I beg to submit my report for the fiscal year ending- 
October 31st, 1920. 

During the season a quantity of fur was taken from the Park, but owing 
to the unusually early " freeze up " last year we did i\ot get started in time as our 
traps had not arrived when the canoeing closed, and also many of the rangers 
were unaccustomed to trapping. However, one hundred bears and a number of 
smaller furs were taken. Owing to the extremely high wages paid for labour in 
this district rangers were very hard to get, and many that applied were not 
competent canoemen. 

I am pleased to say we had no fires in the Park this year. The summer 
season in this district was very wet, the water being higher than for five years 
.before. Owing to the unusually high water two docks and one bridge were 
washed away, but all have since been rebuilt. 

Bass have been found in a small lake south of Quetico Lake. This is the 
farthest north that bass have been discovered on the Park. 

Fur and game are very plentiful, particularly beaver, which are now both in 
the Park and surrounding district. 

Partridge are very plentiful, as I can count while writing this report eleven 
partridge feeding on the clover at the doorway. 

We have had more tourists than ever before, mostly Americans; five hundred 
and twelve dollars being collected for fishing and guides' licenses. 

"We will be obliged to build a barge for transportation of horses and supplies 
on Eva Lake, as the one now in use is worn out and no longer serviceable. Pro- 
vision will be made for the building of the barge this coming winter. 

One of our. gasoline engines is out of order and must be sent to a machine 
shop for needed repairs. One canoe will also be required for next season's work. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) Hugh McDonald, 

Superintendent Quetico Parle. 



116 EEPOKT OF THE Xo. 3 

Appendix No. Jf2. 
Algonquin Peovincial Park of Ontario. 

Honourable Sir, — I beg to hand you my twenty-second report on tlie 
Algonquin Provincial Park for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1930. 

Our staff has been composed of twenty-nine rangers and superintendent, 
housekeeper for rangers' quarters, and caretaker, whose duty it is to keep the 
grounds in order and the rangers' quarters. 

Eangers' Duties. 

The duty of our rangers during the trapping season is, of course, to see that 
no illegal trapping is done within the Park boundaries, and, considering the vast 
territory to cover, and the many means of entrance to watch, they have succeeded 




Headquarters — Algonquin Park. 

very well in doing so, although, no doubt, some lawbreakers have escaped. The 
rangers have made during the year eight arrests, and succeeded in having imposed 
fines to the amount of $325.00, in addition to $25.00 costs, the latter sum repre- 
senting the amount paid to bring in the parties. Where no costs were imposed 
the parties paid their way coming in. In every case their traps, etc., were con- 
fiscated, especially in the case of one gang that had everything taken from them, 
tents, blankets, rifles and provisions, one of the members being an old offender. 

In this connection I would recommend that all rangers be made Provincial 
constables-, so that they could follow a man out beyond the Park, and make arrests. 
Some of them were so made years ago. 

During the year when no trapping is going on our men patrol the Park, 
cutting out portages, repairing shelter houses, and 'seeing that the Park regulation? 
are carried out generally, pirticularly with regard to camp fires; and T am glad 
to report that notwithstanding the hundred^ who spend the summer canoeing and 
camping in the Park, we have had very little trouble along these lines. We find 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS. 117 

tlie public generally muck more alive to the importance of care in this matter 
than they were years ago. I consider the posters, put up each year by the fire 
rangers, have had a good deal to do with this. 

FlEES. 

We had some rather bad fires along the Canadian Northern Railway, but 
they did not do a great deal of damage in the Park. On the south side we have 
been very fortunate, as the fires that started along the railway were caught in 
time and no damage done. The fire tank has been stationed here all summer 
with two men in charge, constantly in readiness to go out on the first train to 
any fire started along the railway. This, with the telephone service, has very 
much minimized the damage along tlie railway from fires started' by locomotives, 
which were our greatest menace. 

Game. 

Game of all kinds is increasing all over the Park, especially the beaver, the 
annual increase of which must run up into thousands. Otter, mink, martin and 
fisher are also abundant, while the deer are greatly in evidence everywhere. Wolves 
are still numerous in the Park and take a large toll of deer. The rangers are 
doing their utmost to destroy them, and a number are killed every year. The 
past winter was an unusually good one for the deer and partridge, and I never 
saw them come through in better condition. 

Live Beaver. 

Regarding the taking of live ])eaver for shipment from the Park, last year 
an order was taken for something over one hundred for points in the United 
States. Of these fifty were shipped, but owing to the embargo placed upon ship- 
ments by the United States we discontinued taking them. We were at a consider- 
able loss after having made preparations to take the full number which we would 
have had shipped in time if the express people had taken them: as it was, we had 
to keep the fifty over for some time, and it took the time of a man to attend 
to them and carry food from the l)usb to feed them. The price obtained was less 
than the skins were worth, while the work of taking them alive is ten times 
greater than taking the pelts, when you have to hold them over any time. 

T would therefore recommend that the price of live beaver, if vou should decide 
to take them, be put at $1-10.00 a pair. The dealers we have at times supplied in 
the States charge $100.00 per animal, and we liave been supplvinir them at $30.00 
each. It was through no fault of ours that all orders were not filled hist year 

T would respectfullv recommend that all live animals sold from Algonquin 
Provincial Park, if possible, be disposed of in Canada. There is so much red 
tape in connection with shipments to the United States, that in getting back our 
empty crates it is hardly worth the bother it gives. For instance, I have only 
just got last summer's empty crates released by customs here, after at least a 
dozen letters and payinsr entry fees. T have no doubt, now that the war is over, 
many people in Canada will turn their attention to breeding fur-bearincc animals, 
and a market could be found for all the Government wish to take out. The price, 
however, should be at least four times the value of the pelts, as thev represent 
at least that much additional cost. A large quantitv of fur has been taken out and 
sold in Toronto, l)ringing the nice sum of $14,179.00. 



118 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Tourists. 

From a tourist standpoint this has been the most successful year since the 
outbreak of the war, and we were glad to see many of our young men back who 
had been overseas. Many came here to build up again, and the amount of benefit 
received was certainly a tribute to health giving qualities of our great Provincial 
health resort. The fishing was good, and some very fine specimens were taken 
both of speckled and salmon trout, and small-mouthed bass. People are beginning 




A fisher, snapped in tlie park. 



to realize the value of this vast reserve and health giving region and are taking 
a deeper interest in all that pertains to its improvement and protection. We 
sold this year fishing licenses to the amount of $1,821.00, and guides' licenses 
to the amount of $54.00. Guides pay a license of $1.00 each, so that we had 54 
licensed guides working in the Park during the. past year. These are paid by 
the different tourist parties coming in at the rate of $4.00 per day and canoe 
found, and $4.50 if the guides furnish their own canoe. This represents over 
$5,000 a month paid to men of the Province, principally by citizens of the United 
States in this one section alone, and gives a very faint idea of what the tourist 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LAXDS AND EORESTS. 



119 



trade means to tlie Province of Ontario. We have collected in rents $810.00 
which does not include the rents paid by the Grand Trunk Eailway and others 
direct to Toronto. A number of new leases have been granted. 

I would recommend a survey being made of Eock Lake such as was made of 
Cache Lake, and $10.00 being charged each applicant for lease in addition to 
the rental to cover survey. This work could be done now to advantage, as it 
could all be done on the ice with the help of our rangers, and the parties could 
stop at our shelter houses. This lake is pretty well crowded now, and Eock Lake 
is being taken up fast. It is very difficult to give a description of the parcels 
asked for without a survey. 

School Camps. 

We have a number of school camps in the Park which represent some fifty 
people, mostly boys. On Cache Lake we have The Large Girls' Camy) under 




Algonquin Park Inn, Railway Station, Pav...i.i.. 

the management of Miss F. L. Case, of Eochester, N.Y. At this camp we have 
some seventy-five persons including help and instructors. These camps are a 
great boon to the young people who attend them, and they go home from the 
holiday built up mentally and physically, and it begets in them a love of the out- 
doors that makes them infinitely better citizens wherever they may locate. 

CORDWOOD. 

The 541 cords of wood left over from last year, of the wood taken out ai 
headquarters by our rangers and some help, has been shipped to different points. 
The shipping of that taken out by jobbers still drags on and will nor be finished 
until well on in 1921. 

• -Hotels. 

Tlie hotels in the Park have been crowded to their full capacity and many 
applicants had to be refused while a great many people tented out all over the 
Park. The Highland Inn will be open all winter, and is pretty well booked up. 



120 REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 



The Grand Trunk are putting in an electric plant here which will be a 
great improvement, and it might be more economical for the Government to 
secure light from them instead of using gas, as now. 

A survey of the eastern boundary was made, and I would recommend one 
being made of the western boundary, as there are hunting camps right up to the line 
in many places, and it is very poorly defined. I have iron Park notices for the 
boundary when surveyed that will make it impossible for any one to trespass 
unknowingly. 

Yours very truly, 

G. W. Baetlett, 

Parh Superintendent. 

Uonourahle Beniah Bowman, Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 43. 

Honourable Beniah Bowman, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report of the work performed by the 
Colonization Roads Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests, for the 
fiscal year ending October 31st, 1920. 

Following the system I adopted last year, I am presenting the report in 
tabulated form. By the use of this method, the details can be given in a more 
concise form than in any other. On the final page is shown a summary of the 
total amounts of the various classes of work performed. 

The total expenditure for the year was $451,808.59. Of this amount $265,- 
993.05 was expended directly by the Government upon roads, bridges, and ppecial 
road drainage, in some three hundred and twenty-five different townships. The 
amount expended upon inspection and miscellaneous services was $23,263.29, the 
balance, a sum of $162,552.25, was distributed as grants to one hundred and forty- 
six municipalities which had expended sums totalling double this amount under 
Colonization Roads By-laws. 

With reference to future expenditures on Colonization Roads, I would recom- 
mend that the only roads upon which the Government should consider making the 
entire expenditure, without local assistance, would be leading, main, market, or 
trunk roads, or roads connecting up isolated settlements. On any other roads, the 
total expense should not be borne by the Government alone, but the work should 
be undertaken by local governing bodies, such as municipal councils, where town- 
ships are organized under the Municipal Act,, or township road commissioners, 
where the townships are organized under the Statute Labour Act. In these cases, 
the expenditures should be supplemented by Government grants to be expended 
by such local bodies under the supervision of an Inspector or Engineer of the 
Department. 



1920-21 DErAET:\rENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 121 

Some such system as this, I think, would tend to increase local interest in 
road construction and maintenance, and cultivate a more self-reliant and inde- 
pendent spirit in the various localities where expenditures are being made by this 
branch, by placing the responsibility for the efficient carrying on of much of the 
roadwork on the local officers of the different townships. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLEETON, 

Superintendent Colonization Roads. 
Toronto, Ontario, October 30th, 1920. 



132 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 





• 


NEW CONSTRUCTION 


o 




i 

i'Name of Work 


Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 
and 
i Shaped 


SURFACED 


s 


(4 

m 
. in 


1 




en 

o 

i 


% 
-(J 




1 

.a 

1 &£ 




2 


1 




















2 


Aberdeen, additional Beaver Hill road. 


120 



60 


100 

220 


18 
24 










r^ 


gravel 


280 


5 


440 


4 










5 




















6 




















7 
8 


Alice and 'Fraser Township roads .... 
Allan Township roads - 


240 


60 


160 


24 


gravel 


55 


6 




q 


Allan Township drainage 
















110 


10 


Anson and Hindon Township roads 


















n 


Anstruther Township roads 


















12 
13 


Appleby and Dunnett Township road. 
Armour and Ryerson Township road. 
Armstrong Township roads 


182 
400 


18 
40 


182 

480 


14 
16 


gravel 


8 


6 




14 










In 


Assiginack Township roads 



















16 


Aubrey Township roads 


















17 


Badgerow Township roads 


















18 


B,adgerow, Gibbons and Field Twp. rds. 
Bagot and Blithfleld Township roads. 

Baldwin Township roads 

Baldwin Township drainage 
















505 


19 


180 
240 


35 
40 


180 
440 


15 
14 


gravel 


150 


10 




?A 








100 


?:>. 


Balfour Townshi.p roads 


















23 


Bangor Wicklow and McClure Tp. Rds. 

Barber Township roa4i 

Barrie Township road 


40 
200 


40 
20 


40 
200 


14 
26 










24 








418 


25 










26 


Barrie Island roads 


















27 


Barrie Island drainage 
















200 


28 
29 


Belmont and Methuen Township roads. 

Bethune Township roads 

Bexley Township roads 


299 
280 


40 
14 


320 
280 


12 
12 


gravel 


24 


8 




30 










31 
82 


Bigwood Township roads 

Bigwood. Kirkipatrick drainage 


350 


14 


400 


14 


gravel 


50 


6 


.5i6 


33 


Billings Township road 

Blezard Township 'roads 


80 


40 


80 


32 










34 








160 


35 


B.onfield Township roads 


100 

160 

100 

1,445 


50 
40 
50 
40 


100 
160 
100 
495 


16 
15 
35 
24 










36 


Boulter Township roads 

Bracebridge-Baysville road 

Brethour Township roads 










37 

38 


gravel 
clay 


100 
15 


10 

8 


403 
210 


39 


Brethour and Casey townline 




40 


Brethour and Pense townline ' 


















41 


Bright Township roads 


















42 


Broder Township roads 


199 


35 


100 


25 








345 


43 


Bromley Township roads 










44 


Brougham Township road 


















45 


Brudenell and Lyndoch Township Rds. i 
















320 


46 


Bucke Township roads 


290 


. 30 


395 


22 


gravel 


50 


6 


335 


47 


Burpee Township roads , 


35 


48 


Burpee Township, drainage 


• 














170 


49 


Burleigh Township road ; 


















50 


Calvin Township roads 1 


















51 


Cameron Township roads 


280 


40 


80 


16 


::::::. ::::::i 







192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



133 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH. 
MEXT. 1919-1920. 













CUT 
AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 




1 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


o;j Graded | 

QUA and ! SURFACED 
Brushed q^,^^^^\ 




a 

a 


It 

1 ^ 


3 


a 


1 

1 






1 

bu 




-yj 1 

2 ■ 1 ._2 i ^ 
^ -c "S 

.3 1^1 § 


T3 -*^ 
o « 

5 5 




ca 








1 


wood 


earth 


40 






760 2 


gravel 


605 


»5 


3.00 

.38 
4.00 
3.00 
1.50 

.57 
1.75 
1.75 

.34 
5.00 

.50 

.60 
1.50 
4.00 
4.00 

.75 

11.00 

3.00 

.25 
1.50 

.31 

.25 
2.50 

.62 

.43 
1.50 

.62 
1.25 
1.50 
2.75 
2.. 50 
1.75 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 

.75 
1.75 
5.25 

.69 

.50 

1.25 

10.00 

.75 
1.00 
4.50 
4.75 
2.25 

.54 


.$ c. 

1,303 24 
318 42 

4,900 00 
541 48 
975 00 
500 00 

1,347 00 
700 87 
200 00 
600 60 
300 00 
997 92 
375 00 

3,306 01 

1,273 04 
386 63 

1,699 18 
965 50 
898 90 
729 84 
175 00 
175 00 

1,211 21 

599 22 
402 90 

1,189 65 
149 75 

299 90 
650 00 
814 30 

1,400 00 

450 00 
1.276 02 

716 50 
1,500 71 

451 09 
4.989 62 
2,058 92 

400 00 
250 00 

600 78 
1,981 93 

800 00 

506 75 

1,102 25 

2,844 55 

1,561 25 

300 00 


1 












2 








6 

4 

10 


cedar 
luetal 
wood 


earth 


150 


280 
20 


15 

30 


35 2 

288 1 
4001 


4 gravel 
6 gravel 
6 gravel 
. gravel 


960 
751 

60 
180 
270 
175 


6 
6 

8 
5 
7 
5 


3 








1 












t^ 
















6 








6 
2 
1 
7 
2 
6 
2 


metal 

rock 

wood 

wood 

cedar 

wood 

cedar 


clay 
earth 


60 
450 






1651 
320 2 


8 gravel 
2 gravel 


7 












s 













9 








stone 
stone 


200 
39 


60 


10 


8601 
821 


8 gravel 
5 gravel 


127 

63 


6 
7 


10 








11 












12 


1 


16 


cedar 


















13 




clay 


2,951 






4001 
100 2 


8 gravel 
4 gravel 
. gravel 
2 gravel 
8 gravel 
4 gravel 
. gravel 


640 
1.040 
240 
221 
300 
805 
35 


8 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
7 


11 








1 


wood 






15 

















16 








10 
6 
1 
4 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 










3,2001 
6501 
6401 


17 


1 


re 




paired 










18 








300 


30 


19 









earth 


240 


90 














n 
















80 


18 


801 
.5601 


8 gravel 
4 gravel 


80 
260 


18 

7 


">?, 








8 
9 


cedar 
wood 


rock 
clay 
stone 
earth 


ioG 

75 

60 

125 


^3 












94 








■"so 


20 


140 1 
,360 2 


4 gravel 
4 gravel 


140 
349 


8 
5 


95 








5 


wood 


?6 








?7 


1 


22 


plank 


2 

11 

4 

7 


wood 
celar 
inetaJ 
wood 


stone 


90 








. clay 
5 gravel 
2 gravel 
4 


40 
201 
280 


7 
6 
6 


?8 








2011 
668 2 
4001 


99 








stone 


105 


20 


10 


30 


I 


12 


wood 


31 




earth 
stone 
stone 


100 
20 
25 












?,?, 








3 


rock 







280 2 

1.2201 

7651 

30 1 

350 2 


4 gravel 
5 


600 


7 


33 








34 








7 
1 
6 

1 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 






) gravel 
5 gravel 
4 gravel 
. gravel 
. gravel 
[) 


165 
20 
350 
140 
219 


8 
8 
10 
7 
7 


35 
















36 








stone 
clay 


95 
66 






37 








38 














39 












clay 


370 


""80 


is 


160 2 

*2,'966 i 

30 3 

320 1 

1,4201 
640 2 
320 2 


40 












. gravel 
S gravel 
5 gravel 

1 gravel 
\ gravel 

2 gravel 
i gravel 


392 
90 
223 
200 
490 
441 
460 


5 
8 
8 
7 
8 
7 
5 


41 








13 


cedar 


gravel 


445 


49 








13 








2 

13 
5 
6 


cedar 
cedar 
ceiar 
wood 










44 
















15 


1 


20 


Jog 


clay 
stone 


740 
419 






16 




30 


12 


17 








18 






















. C. stone 
5 gravel 
3 


70 
145 


7 
8 


49 
50 
51 








4 

7 


wood 
wood 










851 
1001 


.75 575 75 
1.10 805 05 




:::.v.v::i 











134 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 





Name of Work 




NEW CONSTRUCTION 








Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




03 

BQ 
S 

2! 


en 

2 

(3 


♦3 


CO 


.1.3 


"u 
1 


en 
2 

a 

SB 


«f-i 

T3 


w 

T3 



J 


52 


Caniribell Township roads . . . 
















20 


'^'i 


Campbell Township drainage 
















70 


'S'l 


Cane Township roads 


16 

680 


35 
40 


236 

160 

18 


26 
15 
16 


gravel 


137 


7 


114 


"i^ 


Capreol Township roads 


160 


"16 


Carden Township roads 


gravel 


37 


6 




'i? 


Carden, Laxton Victoria road 








F)S 


Carden-Bexley Victoria road 


















5P 


Cardwell Township roads 


400 
240 


50 
40 


400 
160 


20 
30 


earth 


400 


16 




60 


Carling Township roads 


100 


61 


Carlow Township roads 










6^ 


Carnarvon Township roads 


















6'-^ 


Cartier Township roads 


240 

545 

6 


12 

12 
14 












240 


64 


Casey Township roads 


538 
14 


12 
12 








590 


e"! 


Casimir Township road 








14 


66 


Cavendish Tov^nship roads 








12 


67 


Chaffey Township road 


40 


40 


40 


30 










6S 


Chandos Township roads 










60 


Chandos Township drainage 
















170 


70 


Chapleau Township roads 






222 


40 


metal 


150 


30 


206 


71 


("hapman and Croft Township road.. 








72 


Chapman and Loiint road 


16 


8 


16 
200 

34 
325 

287 


8 

16 
16 
12 
16 


gravel 


16 


8 




7"^ 


Chisholm Township roads 





71 


Christie Township roads 


94 
325 


40 
40 








20 


75 


Clarendon Township roads 










76 


Clarendon and Lavant road 








420 


77 


Clarendon and Miller road 














78 


Cockburn Island roads 


175 


40 


160 


30 






.... 




7^ 


Coleman Township road 








40 


80 


Cosby, Martland. etc., boundary .... 






600 


14 


grave] 


1,200 


6 




81 


Creighton Township road 






360 


82 
8'-^ 


Crearer Township roads 


1,150 


36 


1,200 
80 


20 
12 


gravel 
gravel 


280 
60 


6 
6 




Croft Township road 




81 


Dalton Township roads 








85 


Dalton and Rama, boundary 

Darling Township road 














.... 




86 










gravel 


70 


10 




87 


Dawson Townshin roads 


200 


44 


110 


24 


20 


88 


Denbigh Township road 










8tt 


Denison Township road 


960 
40 


14 

20 














qo 


Dowling Township roads 












30 


t)1 


Dryden Township roads 












135 


t»? 


Dummer Township roads 


















93 

94 


Dungannon Township roads 

Dunnet Township roads 


50 


40 


50 


20 


gravel 


50 


7 


20 


95 
96 


Dymond Township roads 


180 
50 


20 
66 


280 
50 


20 
66 


gravel 


240 


7 


220 
50 


Sastnor Township road 


97 


Elzevir Township road 

Elzevir Township drainage 










98 
















50 


99 


Ennismore Township roads 


















100 


Faraday Township roads 








.... 










101 


Fenwick Township roads 


150 
240J 


33 

66 


176 
320 


20 
26 


gravel 


12 


.6 




102 


Feronia to Widdifield road 





192021 



DEPAETMEXT OF LAXDS AXD FOEESTS. 



125 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH. 
MENT, 1919-1920. 



-Continued. 



BRIDGES 



IZ^ i CD 



s 




d 


S! 


^ 


!z; 



CULVERTS 



CUT 
AND FILL 



MAINTENANCE 



Side- 
Brushed 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





tfl 






en 




-(-a 


T3 


+3 




-TJ 


-*:> 


<a 


O 


0) 




o 


<U 


<u 


u 


D 




u 


i> 














M' 


a 


ja* 


'£^ 


■^ 


4S 


■(J 


ao 




« ■ 


6c 


-<^ 


^1 


fl 
^ 


tj 
^ 




a 


T3 



wood 
cedar 



10 



wood 



12 



cedar 



10 



cedai* 



14 



cedar 



wood 



wood 
wood 



wood 



wood 



metal 



wood 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



wood 



cedar 
wood 
wood 
ce iar 



wood 
cedar 
ceda ;• 
celar 
cedai 



cedar 
wood 
cedar 



wood 
cedar 



cedar 
cedar 
wood 



cedar 



cedar 
cedar 



stone 



clay 
stone 



stone 
stone 
earth 



earth 



stone 



stone 
stone 



sand 
earth 



earth 
stone 
stone 



earth 
clay 



stone 
stone 



stone 



stone 



earth 



21.' 



350 



250 

320 

40 

320 



14 



100 



1,290 



80 
180 



516 



320 



345 



145 



45 

60 

112 



40 

176 

15 



90 



946 
"760 



60 



240 



45 



100 

200 

80 



400 



350 



985 



sand 



30 



100 
320 



1,980 



16 1,280 
15 480 



40 



12 



24 



15 



30 



16 



15 



20 



288 
210 
490 
100 
80 
240 
495 



260 



24 



310 
300 
175 



180 
535 
80 
40 
210 
104 



637 
lOO 



1.291 

600 

128 

30 

240 



240 

270 



460 
190 
960 



160 



100 

560 

94 



18 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



16 



stone 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
clay 



gravel 
C. stone 
gi'avel 



gravel 



clay 



C. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



1,592 



827 
165 
322 
220 
256 
40 



523 

960 
440 



145 
200 
350 



200 
180 
195 
704 
133 



268 8 
50 
240 
455 
125 



269 
186 
395 



260 



50 



201 

80 

190 

1,134 



160 



392 
560 
200 



14 



9.50 
.22 
6.85 
3.50 
1-50 
2.00 
1.60 
1 

1.00 

1.00 

2.40 

3.75 

4.50 

.25 

2.00 

1.00 

2.25 

.53 

.75 

.70 

.62 

2.00 

2.75 

1.50 

1.60 

1.25 

.73 

1.00 

6.00 

.50 

4.25 

.25 

5.00 

2.00 

2.00 

1.25 

1.00 

3.00 

2.00 

.85 

.63 

2.00 

.60 

5.00 

.16 

.,50 

.16 

1.25 

1.75 

4.. 50 

1.50 



$ c. 

,953 62 
100 00 

,294 29 
802 62 
802 03 

500 00 

501 00 
981 80 
601 10 
198 73 

,732 33 
203 70 

,171 30 
175 00 
352 29 

499 89 
569 50 
450 00 

,000 00 
359 22 
400 00 

,997 11 
988 39 
601 50 
800 00 
399 90 

399 82 
,000 00 
.989 56 

300 00 
,171 
300 00 
593 20 

400 00 
799 78 

502 19 
416 25 
130 00 
512 15 
299 87 
275 00 

.403 22 

500 00 
,558 37 

500 00 
201 20 
200 00 

503 00 
199 ,52 

,100 00 
508 60 



89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 



126 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 



Name of Work 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





to 






to 


9> 


-n 


4) 




-n 




u 


<U 
















4a 


5 


M 


e8 


JH 




U) 


-*a 


<u 




t3 


a 


nS 

^ 


-♦J 

1 





103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 



Ferris, Astorville to Callander 

Ferris Township roads 

Field and Bastedo Township roads. . 

Firstbrook Township roads 

Foley Township roads 

Freeman Township road 

Frontenac Trunk road, drainage . . . . 

Galbraith Township roads 

Galbraith and Aberdeen road 

Galbraith Township roads 

Garson Township road 

Gibbons and Crerar road 

Gladstone Township road 

Gladstone and Parkinson road 

Glamorgan Township roads 

Glamorgan and Monmouth road 

Gordon Township roads 

Gordon Township drainage 

Gould Township road 

Grattan Township roads 

Griffith and Matawatchan Twp. roads. 

Gurd Township roads 

Hagar Township roads 

Hagar and Loughrin Boundary road. 

Hagar, St. Charles road 

Hagarty Township roads 

Hallam Township roads 

Hagerman Township roads 

Harley Township roads 

Harley and Dymond townline 

Harley and Dymond townline 

Harley and Casey townline 

Harley and Kerns townline 

Harris Township roads 

Harris and Casey townline 

Harris and Dymond boundary 

Harrow and May townline 

Hanmer Township roads 

Harvey Townshipi roads 

Head, Clara and Maria Twp. road 

Henwood Township roads 

Hilliard Township roads 

Hilliard and Armstrong Boundary . . 

Hilliard and Ingram Boundary 

Himsworth North Township roads . . 
Himsworth North Nipissing road . . . . 
Himsworth South Township roads. . . 

Hinchinbrooke Township road 

Horton Township roads 

Howe Island roads 

Howland Township road 



640 



100 



160 



580 
90 



320 



30 
140 



160 

40 

160 



60 



40 



24 



30 



640 

"ioo 



120 



520 
90 



320 
'240 



260 
320 



320 

180 

80 



16 



cinders 



earth 



gravel 



earth 



clay 



gravel 



640 



40 



80 



320 



30 



240 



15 



400 



50 



120 



1,020 



26 

19 



960 



50 



460 



30 
143 
100 



196 
325 



112 

38 
50 
38 

7 



115 



192021 



DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



12^ 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH.— Continued. 
MENT, 1919-1920. 



BRIDGES CULVERTS 



>H 




u 




.o 




a 


eg 




O. 


'^ 


OJ 



MAINTENANCE 



CUT 
AND FILL 



Side- 
Brushed 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 



o :2 





05 




-tJ 


'T3 


-tj 


a) 


o 


OJ 


<u 


}-l 


4J 


«*-( 




«tH 


.a 




4a 


-t-' 


cm 




TS 


a 


-d 


pi 


^ 


^ 



^ !^ 





H 




05 




& 




H 


f*i 




o 


Q 


■< 


(5 


H 


E:^ 


h3 


eu 




X 


S 


» 



30 



125 



16 



timb'r 



log 



wood 



11 
8 
4 
1 



wood 
cedar 
wood 



gravel 
stone 



stone 
stone 
wood 



cedar 
wood 
plank 



wood 
wood 



metal 
wood 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



wood 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 



cedar 



wood 



wood 



wood 
wood 
wood 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 



stone 



earth 
stone 



earth 



stone 



eartn 
stone 



rock 
gravel 
earth 



clay 
gravel 



clay 



clay 



earth 



300 



65 
1,160 



100 



50 



250 
321 



30 

600 

1,803 



4.214 
110 



1.297 



385 



60 



earth 80 

stone I 200 



32010 



95 

80 

160 

150 



365 
160 



260 

395 

15 



780 
"25 



112 
640 
320 
480 
20 



10 



10 



710 
200 



480 



248 
110 
320 
320 



1,000 



1.280 
536 



125 



920 

1,484 

240 

500 



104 
520 
1,280 
200 
570 
320 



170 
320 
680 



110 



900 
203 
280 
1,998 
750 



240 

160 

80 



300 



12 



18 



24 



26 



30 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
earth 
gravel 



gravel 



earth 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
C. stone 
gravel 



240 

228 



375 
497 



300 
430 
175 
192 
320 
200 
240 
600 
110 
120 
631 



1«5 
"246 



670 
340 
150 
398 
140 



803 
30 

320 
90 



327 



130 
177 
280 
100 
320 
320 
160 
180 
200 
235 
30 



.to 
4.00 

.65 
2.10 
1.60 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.25 
1.00 
3.25 

.75 
4.00 
2.00 

.50 
2.50 
3.20 

.50 
3.25 
5.00 

.75 
4.00 

.28 

.33 
3.00 
5.00 

.75 
5.00 
1.00 
1.00 

.53 
1.00 
3.50 

.50 
1.00 

.28 
3.00 
2.25 

.88 
7.50 
4.00 

.88 

.63 
3.25 
1.00 
2.00 

.55 
1.00 

.75 

.13 



$ c. 
436 25 
585 25 
199 10 
,001 79 
912 00 
,395 50 
,000 00 
,809 24 
400 67 
450 50 
202 11 
673 99 
346 62 
,301 75 
600 00 
400 00 
,376 00 
740 00 
400 00 
805 48 
,223 75 
301 85 
,104 59 
148 35 
400 00 
,124 00 
,476 50 
300 00 
,675 68 
700 00 
400 00 
400 00 

400 00 
,095 82 

350 00 
849 80 
300 50 
500 00 
606 50 
399 14 
.963 36 
,410 53 
605 03 
697 07 
703 88 
300 00 
553 55 
300 00 
275 00 
475 00 

401 85 



103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 



128 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 



Name of Work 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





03 






03 


-t^ ■ 


T3 


-(-a 




73 


OJ 


O 


OJ 




o 


OJ 


^ 


OJ 




^ 












-g 


Xi 


-fi' 


rt 
"C 


-C 




Cm 




OJ 


at 
c 

4) 


XJ 

^ 




■n 


c3 



54 Rowland and Bidwell Township road. 

55 Hudson Township roads 

56 Hudson and Dymond townline 

57 Hugel and Kirkpatrick Twp. roads . . 

58 Humphrey Township roads 

59 Hungerford Township roads 

60 Huntingdon Township roads 

61 Jocelyn Township road 

62 Johnson Township roads 

63 .Toly Township road 

64 Kaladar Township, Addington road.. 

65 Kennebec Township roads 

66 Kennebec and Barrie Township roads. 

67 Kirkpatrick Township road 

68 Kerns Townshin road 

69 Kerns and Armstrong Township road. 

70 Kerns and Henwood Township road. 

71 Kerns and Hudson Township road . . 

72 Laird Township roads 

73 L'Amable to Maynooth, etc. roads.... 

74 Laxton and Digby Township roads.. 
75{Laxton and Bexley Township roads.. 

76 Lee Valley road 

77|Lefroy Township roads 

78 Limerick Township roads 

79 Lindsay Township roads 

80 Lindsay Township drainage 

81 Loughborough Township roads 

82 Loughborough and Bedford Typ. roads. 

83 Lome Township roads 

84 Loughrin Township roads 

85 Louise Township road 

86 Louise Township drainage 

87 Lount and Machar Township road . . . 

88 Lount, Machar and Gurd Twp. road . . 

89 Lumsden Township roads 

90 Lutterworth Township roads 

91 Lyell Township road 

92 Machar Township roads 

93 Machar and Gurd Township roads 

94 Madoc Township reads 

95 Mara Township roads 

96 Mara Township drainage 

97j Marmora Township drainage 

98'Martland Township roads I 

99 Matchedash Township drainage I 

20'J Mattawan Township roads I 

201 May township road I 

202 May and Hallam Township road ....! 

2031 Mayo Township roads I 

204iMedonte Township roads 



150 



160 
32 



300 



20 



200 



910 
640 



18 



40 



16 



350 



122 

34 



300 



20 



14 



22 



240 20 



33 

185 

182 

350 

27 

60 



910 

640 



80 



18 



sani 



gravel 



32 



60 



gravel 



69 



10 



519 



10 

7 



60 
25 



100 



20 



33 



340 



50 



18 



14 



16 



gravel 



19 
50 



40 



40 
460 
300 
300 



60 



31 



90 

7 



67 

185 

80 

30 

480 



40 



192021 



DEPAKTMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



129 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH.— Continued. 
MENT, 1919-1920. 









1 




CUT 
AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 


% 

a 


1=3 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded i 

and SURFACED 
Shaped 




Li 

a: 


I 


3 
1 


I 
u 

a 

2; 




"u 


3 
o 


CO 

1 

a 
1 1-5 


4) 
■73 


05 

u ^ 

■i , 




to 

% 

u 

at 
a 




3J 

pa 






1 

t 


1 
8 


rock 
wood 


stoue 
clay 


350 
1,474 








. gravel 


1 

14C 
976 
48C 

5C 
27C 
200 
100 

90 
270 


() 

7 
7 
6 
6 
7 
7 
5 
5 


1 

.50 

6.25 

1.50 

4.25 

1.00 

.63 

.31 

.50 

1.50 

.12 

3.00 

4.00 

1.10 

1.25 

3.00 

.50 

.63 

.75 

1.00 

3.25 

.75 

.75 

.03 

1.00 

.50 

.60 

.63 

1.50 

1.20 

3.75 

2.00 

.75 

.75 

.25 

2.00 

1.00 

2.00 

1.00 

.75 

.31 

.37 

3.00 

.58 


$ C. 

507 86 

2,450 75 

1.001 02 

1,999 87 

898 82 

400 50 

300 00 

300 00 

944 64 

150 00 

307 50 

1.004 60 

400 62 

1.000 00 
2,049 54 

600 00 
800 00 
399 95 
550 50 

3.001 65 
506 65 
502 85 
448 99 
799 97 
306 75 
500 00 
207 25 
599 95 

299 43 
1,175 00 

280 51 
593 53 
99 53 
203 40 
500 00 
301 00 
920 42 
450 00 
604 06 

300 80 
299 70 
791 37 
1Q7 1!^ 


151 


1 


-^16 


wood 


320 


5 

i 


1,600^ 
320^ 

1,050] 
320] 
2001 
100] 
160 i 
100^ 


l\ gravel 
J4 gravel 
8 gravel 
6 gravel 
6 gravel 
4 gravel 
JO gravel 
J2 gravel 


155 
156 








11 
7 


plank 
cedar 








157 
158 












265 20 
















159 




















160 




















161 








1 


wood 


earth 
stone 
stone 


422 

28 
64 






162 


?. 


14 


cedar 






163 












800] 

442] 

34] 

3501 


4 gravel 
6 gravel 

5 gravel 
4 gravel 
. gravel 


160 
344 
340 


5 
9 
5 


161 








12 


wood 


60 
20 


15 
30 


165 












166 








10 
3 


wood 
wood 






150' 6 


167 








earth 


1,774 






590 
160 
207 
145 
180 
510 
164 
179 


7 
7 

7 

\ 

7 
6 
7 


168 














. gravel 


169 






















. gravel 


170 




















240 2 
200 2 
9001 
104 1 
130 2 


4 gravel 
4 gravel 
6 gravel 
8 gravel 
gravel 


171 








2 

8 
3 
4 


wood 
cedar 
stone 
metal 


earth 
stone 
stone 
stone 
earth 
earth 


200 

60 

65 

80 

100 

744 


50 
100 

25 
105 


30 
20 
10 
20 


172 


1 


14 


cedar 


173 
171 








175 


1 


16 


wood 


176 












160 2 

1201 

401 


gravel 
4 gravel 
6 gravel 


"245 

80 

170 


6 
7 
5 


177 












80 


20 


178 
















179 




















180 








5 


tile 


stone 
stone 
earth 


177 

50 

135 






3311 

3401 

90 2 


4 gravel 
4 gravel 
2 gravel 


420 
136 
240 


5 
9 
6 


181 








18^ 








22 


wood 







183 








184 


1 


11 


wood 


11 
5 
1 
2 

4 
6 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 


stone 
earth 


15 
50 


..... 


•• 


200 2 


gravel 



40 


6 


185 
186 












401 
6401 
2501 
3041 
3201 
1601 
1001 
1201 
9151 


8 gravel 
2 


40 


7 


187 












480 

40 

116 


20 
20 
15 


188 












6 






189 








stone 
rock 


70 
15 


6 gravel ' 
) gravel 
5 gravel 
5 1 


361 

10 

217 


6 
8 
6 


190 








191 








1 
1 

1 


cedar 
cedar 
cedar 


iqp 












100 


16 


193 












) gravel 
8 g»-avel 
1 


120 
101 


7 
6 


194 








clay 


649 


' 


-1 


195 












196 












rock 


8 


' 


1 




, 






.57 591 20 
10.00 1 2QQ 17 


197 








5 


wood 


1 

1 




2,8001^ 


1 gravel ! 


300 


6 


98 












1 




1.50 
.90 
.38 


227 26 
799 62 : 
401 37; 


99 








5 


wood 










145 1( 


} gravel 
j gravel ; 
\ gravel 
[ gravel 

' i/ravpl 


140 
110 
60 
160 
194 


10 
6 
6 
7 

7 


>00 
















>01 












earib 


40 






80 2^ 
2001^ 

8'2L 


.25! 258 33 2 

l.OOl 509 50 2 

751 913 30 L 


?02 








2 


cedar 






>03 








clay 


i,902| 




. 1 


>nj 




9 


L.F. - 















130 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 



Name of Work 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared I Graded 

and and 

Stumped *| Shaped' 



SURFACED 



-s 





m 






IC 


•*3 


73 


■*^ 




13 


« 


p 


0) 




o 


•Si 




^ 


zi 


»H 


Xi 




jS 


'»H 


•xT ! 




ti 




w 















^ ^ 



205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 



Medonte Township drainage 

Medora Township roads 

Medora and Wood Township road . 

Merritt Township roads 

Mills Township roads (Manitoulin) 
Mills Township roads (Parry Sound). 

Mills and Hardy Township road ■, 

Minden Township road 

Minden and Somerville Twp. road... 

Monck Township road 

Monteagle Township roads 

Monteith Township road 

Morgan Township roads 

Morrison Township road 

Murchison Township road 

Muskoka "Township roads 

Muskoka District drainage 

Macaulay and Draper townline 

McDonald Township road 

McDonald, Kehoe and Meredith road. 
Meredith and Aberdeen Add'l road . . . . 

McDougal Township drainage 

McKenzie Township road 

McKenzie and 'B.urton Twp. road 

McKim Township roads 

McKinnon and Harrow Twp. road .... 
McLean and Ridout Township roads.. 

McMurrich Township roads 

McMurrich and Perry Township roads 

McNab Township roads 

MacPherson Township roads 

MaoPherson Township Boundary Rd.. 
MacPherson and Caldwell Twp. road . . 
MacPherson and London Twp. road . . 

Nipissing Township roads 

Nipissing and Gurd Twps., Alsace rd.. 
North Algona Township roads ...... 

Oakley Township road 

Oakley and Draper townline 

Olden Township roads 

Orillia Township roads 

Orillia Township drainage 

Orillia and Matchedash road 

Orillia and Matchedash Twp. drainage. 

Oro Township roads 

Ore and Medonte Township road .... 
Oro and Medonte Township drainage. 

Oso and Bedford road 

Oso and Olden road 

Pakenham Township road 

Palmerston Townsihip roads 



160 



200 



200 



80 



320 



160 

25 

100 



32 



700 
460 
100 



65 



320 



25 



30 



50 



30 



45 



12 



40 



18 



160 

'820 



100 

"so 

*540 



400 

25 

100 



32 
'364 



700 
280 
100 



30 



40 



earth 



earth 



clay 
gravel 



earth 



earth 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



249 



100 



80 



12 



20 



60 10 



400 
"56 



40 
200 



10 



18 



600 



200 
200 



40 



20 



70 
184 
826 



28 
280 



80 



80 

"ieo 
'326 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



131 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH— Continued. 
MENT, 1919-1920. 



L 






CLLVERTS 


CUT 
AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 




H 

3 

X 




1 """• 


Side- 
Brushec 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




1. 

a 


a 

a 

CO 




a 


'Eh 


"3 


>> 
« 

o 


a 




O 

-►J 




an 


*3 

-a 
'a 


05 

w 

S3 


I 






1 

5 
6 

26 
3 
5 


cement 
stone 
metal 
wood 
wood 
cedar 














gravel 
earth 
earth 
gravel 
gravel 


22 
200 
250 
160 
525 


7 

12 

20 

5 

6 


.25 

1.25 

1.50 

2.00 

3.00 

1.25 

.50 

3.00 

2.25 

.63 

1.75 

1.25 

1.50 

4.50 

1.25 

1.75 

.63 

2.50 

.24 

.75 

.50 

.13 

.75 

1.25 

3.08 

.40 

3.50 

.25 

2.50 

1.00 

10.00 

3.25 

4.50 

2.50 

3.10 

.31 

.75 

2.00 

3.00 

.75 

1.25 

.25 

.75 

.63 

.25 

.05 

.50 

.30 

.75 

3.50 

1.00 


$ c. 
300 85 

399 00 
988 36 
764 66 

1.077 00 
450 00 
200 00 
599 90 

499 87 
490 73 
912 17 
208 50 

1,101 63 

500 00 
500 00 
698 67 
743 17 

2,996 91 
200 00 
303 25 
398 06 
175 00 
349 87 
305 75 
675 00 
500 60 

498 23 
203 50 

2,001 40 

500 00 

3,000 00 

1.498 88 

2,000 00 

497 51 

1,310 67 

359 85 

499 84 
499 90 

1,999 31 
418 65 
606 36 
179 70 
395 75 
98 58 
212 35 

400 00 
100 00 
300 00 
199 79 
900 00 
660 35 


^05 


■ 






Stone 
rock- 
earth 
stone 


20 

30 

155 

12 


20 
480 
150 

60 


25 
30 
16 
40 


400 
400 
250 
610 


20 
20 
16 
16 


?06 


■ 






?07 


1 


18 


cedar 


208 
?09 








^10 
















160 
720 
535 


12 
16 
16 


gravel 
gravel 
earth 


40 

94 

245 


7 
3 
6 


•^n 








9 
4 
5 

10 
7 
4 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 


stone 
vock 
earth 


50 

5 

30 


325 
165 


20 

20 


91? 








'^13 








^14 


L 












420 


14 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


260 
260 
360 
240 


7 

7 

8 

10 


■^is 


■ 










400 


20 


^16 


K 






rock 


375 


360 

1,300 

400 


16 
20 
16 


917 


w 










?18 








5 
8 
3 

8 


wood 
metal 
wood 
cedar 










?19 




10 


wood 
















??.() 




rock 
stone 


120 
40 
















??^ 




12 


cedar 


600 


25 


700 


20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


700 
75 
60 

120 


10 
5 

5 
5 


222 
??3 












earth 
earth 
rock 


40 

40 

8 






200 
100 


22 
24 


9?4 












??5 
















??6 








7 
7 


cedar 
cedar 






240 


12 


gravel 


240 


6 


??1 
















'^?8 
















960 


20 


gravel 


960 


10 


?^9 








1 

7 


wood 
cedar 










^30 
















1,040 
80 


20 
14 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


500 
80 
700 
243 
2,720 
140 
700 


10 
6 

10 
6 
6 
6 
6 


'^31 








rock 


'<^ 






'^3? 








5 


wood 


400 
25 


10 
15 


*>33 








stone 


9c 


"""is 

2,620 

650 

1,275 


12 
20 
18 
18 


•^34 


2 


12 


wood 


28 
15 
13 
12 
10 
2 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 


?35 












?36 
















^37 
















238 
















320 


16 








239 






















240 












70 
30 
60 


33 
10 
25 


70 
625 
200 
100 
245 


15 
20 
20 
12 
22 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


137 
90 

900 
60 

177 


10 
5 

10 
5 
6 


211 








5 
6 


cedar 
wood 


stone 


60 


212 








213 








earth 


40 


211 












232 


36 


215 








3 


metal 


gravel 


30 


216 








212 
200 


18 
18 


82 


18 


gravel 


41 


6 


217 








1 


cedar 






218 












40 


18 


gravel 


59 


8 


219 












earth 


920 






250 


























251 




















80 
200 
380 

10 


12 
14 
18 
14 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


87 

88 

360 

280 


10 
8 
8 
8 


252 












stone 
stone 
stone 


27 
200 
278 


105 
320 


10 
10 


953 








1 
1 


cedar, 
stone 


251 








255 



133 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OP LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 



Name of Work 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 



to 





CO 






c» 


1-3 


'S 


-*a 




•w 


0) 


o 


3) 




o 


.« 




.« 


1 


^ 




„ 




cd 




-a 


5 


^■" 


^ 


5 




<u 


^ 
^ 


^ 
S 


ail 



5 

bo 



256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269, 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 



Palmerston and Clarendon Twp. roads. 

Papineau Township roads 

Parke Township roads 

Patterson Township road 

Patton Township roads 

Pembroke Township roads 

Perry and Monteith Township roads. 

Petawawa Township roads 

Phelps Township roads 

Plummer Township roads 

Plummer Add'l Township roads 

Pringle Twp. Commanda road 

Radcliffe Township roads 

Raglan Township roads 

Rama Township roads 

Ramsay Township roads 

Rayside Township roads 

Robinson Township roads 

Rolph Township roads 

Ross Township roads 

Ryde and Draper Townline road 

Ryerson and McMurrich Boundary rd. 

St. Edmunds Township road 

Sabine Township roads 

Salter, May and Harrow Tp. river rd. 

Sandfleld Township roads 

Sebastopol Township roads 

Shakespeare and Baldwin T^. roads.. 

Sheffield Township roads . . .* 

Sheguiandah Township drainage 

Sherwood and Jones Township roads. 

Somerville Township road : 

South Algona Township roads 

Snowdon Township roads 

S'pence Township roads 

Springer Township roads 

Stafford Township roads 

Stanhope Township roads 

Stephenson & Watt Townline road... 

Stisted Township roads 

Storrington Township roads . . . ._t . . . 

Striker Township roads 

Strong Township roads 

Sunnidale Township road 

Tarbutt Additional Township roads. . 

Tarentorous Township road 

Tay Township roads 

Tay Township drainage 

Tehkummah Township roads 

Thessalon Township roads 

Thompson Township roads 



80 



360 



340 



240 



40 
225 



40 



18 



78 20 
60 16 



20i 12 



360 
"60 



gravel 
gravel 



sand 



gravel 



160 



30 



320 



115 



260 
80 



12 



35 



122. 43 



224 6 



26 



225 

35 



74 



133 



200 
70 



110 



26 



18 gravel 



20 



earth 
gravel 



8 
10 



80 



70 



40 



225 

45 



14 



gravel 



74 



20 



24 



gravel 



40 



18 



60 



130 
46 



60 

160 

20 



161 



500 



90 
386 



190 



15 



429 
"60 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OP LANDS AND FORESTS. 



133 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH. 
MKNT, 1919-1920. 



-Continued. 

















MAINTENANOE 




05 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


CUT 
AND FILL 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 






1 

a 




3 
a 


a 




1 


to 






CO 

t-i 




"3. 

ce 


to 

2 % 

M ■^ ^ 


a 








1 

7 


stone 
wood 


stone 


18 


180 


10 


280 
520 
1,120 
160 
170 
411 
140 
261 


14 
16 
14 
12 
20 
16 
12 
18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
sand 
gravel 


470 
200 
560 
240 
154 
241 
140 
121 


8 1.75 
8 2.25 
6 3.50 
6 .75 
6 .75 
8 1.30 
8 1.00 
8 1.00 
. 1.13 

5 1.00 

6 .75 

7 1.50 
. 2.75 
6 3.50 
6 .75 
6 1.20 

8 .75 

6 1.50 
. 2.00 
8 1.00 
2.50 

7 1.75 

.10 

8 1.50 

5 1.69 

6 1.50 
6 4.70 

6 1.75 

7 1.20 

.28 

8 5.25 
6 .55 
8 2.75 

5 2.00 

6 1.50 
8 4.25 

6 1.00 

.50 
3.00 
5 2.85 
8 1.25 
5 1.50 
5 .50 

7 .78 
5 .75 

.38 

7 1.00 

1.43 


1,102 93 

1,299 13 

1,528 25 

300 00 

698 59 


256 








•^57 
















'->58 





















'^59 








4 


wood 


earth 


1,365 


100 


25 


'i(k(\ 








600 00 im 


1 


12 


cedar 


7 
1 
9 


cedar 
stone 
wood 


stoae 


20 


240 
150 


20 
33 


677 24 

700 00 
501 01 

701 35 
1,602 65 

400 00 
699 49 
710 04 
998 67 
375 00 
900 00 
1,139 95 
199 00 
800 00 


262 
'^63 












^64 








earth 
earth 


150 
444 






160 


20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


290 

170 

80 


'''65 


h ;:: 






5 


wood 






'>66 


B 1 


re 
10 


paired 
plank 


240 
640 
187 
194 


20 
12 
35 
15 


"'486 

865 

1,120 

23 

45 

151 

90 

640 

200 

800 


10 
12 
17 
18 
20 
20 
20 
18 
16 
20 


'>^1 


1 1 


14 

7 


cedar 
cedar 






■-'68 


F 






gravel 
gravel 
C. stone 
sand 
gravel 


45 
157 
378 
1401 
125 


•>69 








rock 


410 


■^70 












?71 








5 


wood 






63 

25 

320 


30 
12 
30 


979 








gravel 


80 


'-'73 








2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
4 


metal 
cedar 
cedar 
metal 
cedar 
wood 


?1\ 


1 


10 


cedar 


clay 


32 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


100 
60 1 
320 


275 








999 80 276 








gravel 
stone 


320 
225 






800 681277 
















500 00 278 












450 


16 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


10 
220 
475 
270 

70 
346 


450 00 279 
















550 40 
999 99 
807 25 
698 72 
350 00 
196 87 
914 20 
306 00 

1,199 00 
500 00 

551 50 
2.112 05 

600 00 
401 48 
1,000 00 
908 25 
300 00 
801 25 
550 00 
400 00 
350 00 
199 90 
497 30 
57.T (in 


'-^80 












stone 
stone 
earth 
stone 


500 

27 

500 

120 


7 
240 


15 
20 


60 

1,360 

560 

30 


22 
12 
20 
19 


'^81 


2 


13 


cedar 


13 
2 

1 


cedac 

wood 

concrete 


282 
'^83 












'->84 












?85 








5 


cedar 


gravel 


593 


720 


12 


960 


12 


gravel 
C. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


654 
176 
441 
200 
480 
650 
211 


286 








'-•87 








7 
3 
4 
6 


cedar 
wood 
cedar 
plank 


clay 


40 


150 

560 

40 


20 
16 
30 


595 
560 
160 
790 
280 


14 

18 
7 

14 
30 


2S8 








'>89 












290 










291 
















'>Gf> 


... 






2 
3 

11 
3 
7 

10 


stone 
stone 
wood 
metal 
wood 
cedar 


stone 
stone 
stone 


**"72 
36 

70 






•-'93 












900 

880 


18 
20 


gravel 
earth 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


5001 
3101 
430 

90 

70 
250 
140 


904 








700 
10 
80 
20 


25 
20 
20 
15 


295 








296 












250 
30 


18 
16 


297 












298 












299 








1 


cedar 


stone 


10 






240 


22 


300 












301 












clay 


135 






274 


22 


R. clay 


291 


302 








1 
3 
1 


cement 
rock 
wood 




" 


303 








stone 
stone 


50 
800 


70 


16 


170 

40 

127 


24 
23 
24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


440 

70 

163 


S 2.751,099 65 
5 .25 398 92 
B .75 503 75 


304 
305 








...... 




"127 


20 


306 



134 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

. Annual State 



Name of Work 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 



si 



307 Tiny Township roads 

308 Tudhope Township roads 

309 Tudor and Cashel Township road . . 

310 Tyendinaga Township roads 

311 VanHorne Township roads 

312 Vankouglinet Township roads 

313 Verulam and iSomerville Twp. road 

314 Vespra Township roads 

315 Wallbridge Township roads 

316 Wainwright Township Culvert . . . . 

317 Waters Township roads 

318 Wells Township roads . . r 

319 Westmeath Township roads 

320 Widdifield Township roads 

321 Wilberforce Township roads 

322 Wollaston Township roads 

323 Wylie Township roads 

324 Beckwith Township roads 



198 



Total 23,103 



270 



20 



103 



40 



28 



198 



282. 
"150 



m 
"ioo 








M 


1 


'a 


.a 


*- 1 
1 


^ 


^^ 


4= 


<u 


(U 


. -^j 


■*^ 


a 


-ri 


s 




^ 



12 



.22 



60 



35 



21 



clay 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 



22,014 7,297 ....21,163 



400 



150 



3p 



20 



240 

198 



204 

"eo 



77 
60 



80 



1920 21 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



135 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRA'SCU.— Concluded. 
jiENT, 1919-1920. 

















>L\IXTEXANCE 


&3 
O 
•< 


3 




BKIDGES 


CULVERTS 


OUT 
AND FILL 


Side- 
Brushed 


Graded 

and SURFACED 

Shaped 






rt 

^ 


s 

a 


1 
1 




'•Z 


en ■ 

C8 

>» 

o 

5 


■ 2- 

be 

a ■ 


-(J 


a 




3 

(73 


an 


-(J 


3h 

•CO 
7. 










earth 


50 






..,.,. 


, 


gravel 


170 


6 


1.28 

J. 62 

1.25 

.75 

1.88 


$ c. 
594 40 307 






1 
1 


wood 
cedar 










1,024 80 308 







stone 


100 






400 
240 


14 
16 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
C. stone 
gravel 


160 
160 
600 
193 
376 
542 


7 
7 
5 


500 99 309 


^ 








301 95 310 


















908 25311 






8 


cedar 


sand 


1,570 


183 


12 


880 


20 


6j 4.50 
6i 1.17 
7 1.70 


2,200 00 312 




300 00 313 


1 




















500 72 314 






3 
1 
1 


plank 
wood 
wood 
















.50 

.01 

1.07 


428 92315 


1 






















12 00316 


\ 




earth 


300 






20 
320 


10 

?0 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


320 
300 

70 
370 
737 
160 

60 
100 

71.768 


6 


358 15 317 


! 


160 



20 


5! 1.00 
6 .35 
8 2.00 


606 07318 






1 

9 

11 


concrete 
wood 
metal 


gravel 


100 


29il9 
49818 
71016 
160 14 


800 00319 






• • . • 




1,114 69 320 










560 
40 


30 
20 


8 

7 


5.10 
.50 


1,945 00 321 










298 47 322 


1 












160 


20 


12| .50 
7 .30 


300 00 323 


*'..'... 
















375 00324 
















' 


100811 


— • 








1 


331 




1064 






44,974 


21355 


582.02 


265,993 05 

















136 



REPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 



TOWNSHIPS 



CLEARED 




1 


AND 


GRADED 


STUMPED 






-<-3 






a) 












« 




<4H 




0) 


^ 




^ 




f.^ 




t'S 


^* 


a 2 




J^ 





SURFACED 



5i2 



Admaston By-law No. 240 

Alberton By-law No. 1 

Alice & Fraser By-law No. 5 

Amabel By-law No. 235 

Asslginack By-law No. 427 

Atwood By^aw No. 105 

Bagot & Blythfleld By-law No. 334 

Belmont & Methuen By-law 614 

Billings By-law No. 252 

Blezard By-law No. 112 

Blue By-law No. 48 

Brethour By-law No. 16 

Bromley By-law No. 294 

'B.rougham By-law No. 412 

Brudenell & Lyndoch By-law No. 251. 

Bucke By-law No. 233 

Burleigh & Anstruther )By-law No. 1 . . 

Burpee By-law No. 105 

Camden By-law No. 497 

Caldwell By-law No. 282 

Cardiff By-law No. 548 

Carlow By-law No. 113 

Casey By-law No. 57 

Casimir, Jennings & Appleby By-law 

No. 87 

Chamberlain By-law No. 64 

Chappie By4aw No. 265 

Chapman By-law No. 7 

Ohisholm By-law No. 103 

Conmee 'By-law No. 48 

Cosby & Mason By-law No. 47 

Dilke By-law No. 93 

Draper By-law No. 390 

Drury, Denison & Graham By-law No. 

191 

Dummer iBy-law No. 879 

Dungannon By-law No. 90 

Dymond By-law No. 192 

Dysart Bynlaw No. 623 

Eastnor By-law No. 25 

Eldon By-law No. 494 

Elzevir & Grimsthorpe By-law No. 48A. 

Emo By-law No. 238 

Ferris By-law No. 584 

Front of Leeds & Lansdowne By-law 

750 , , 

Front of Yonge By-law No. 102 

Grattan By-law No. 277 

Gordon By-law No. 162 

Hanmer By-law No. 100 

Harley By4aw No. 254 

Harley By-law No. 289 

Harris By-law No. 68 

Harvey By-law No. 360 

Hilliard By-law No. 116 

Hilton By-law No. 405 



312 

380 



340 
300 



351 



80 



66 



10 



1,035 

280 



870 



160 



no 



1,280 



40 



3,373 
h50 



1,895 



330 



153 



66 



40 



20 



16 



20 



20 



16 



10 



16 



1,235 
312 

248 

510 

2,500 

48 

1,000 

171 

810 
1,280 

448 
3,572 
2,047 

222 
1,740 

480 
61 

250 



3,350 

1.265 

760 

3,460 

910 

440 

1,720 

661 



398 
3,480 

154 
2.640 

4,280 

2,776 

480 

9,915 

2,088 

350 

537 

320 

125 

1,270 

211 

205 

813 

710 

4,800 

4,720 

4,940 

680 

1,538 

3,350 

278 



15 
16 
16 
18 
16 
30 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
24 
16 
12 
16 
16 
16 
24 



16 
14 
16 
14 

16 
15 
14 
16 
14 
28 
16 
16 
20 
14 

16 
9 
16 
24 
20 
16 
20 
16 
16 
24 
20 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
■ gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
0. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gfavel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



450 

674 

260 

1,010 

2,600 

294 

1,000 

336 

495 

640 

120 

952 

1,348 

222 

80 

915 

162 

250 

640 

2,095 

■ 108 

480 

208 

340 

60 

1,740 

1,061 

225 



360 

260 

1,418 

3,735 

431 

60 

984 

2,234 



615 

480 

1,766 

170 

1,229 



865 
1,245 



868 
973 
460 
818 
795 
185 



192021 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



137 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1920. 



DITCHED 


CUT OR FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


NEW ROAD 
MILEAGE 





GOVERNMENT 
EXPENDITURE 




5" CO 

si 

2 


'g 
cS 


— en 

a . 
2 ^ 

a « 




+3 



n. 


D 


u 

a 




•A 
w 

M 

J2; 




















4.00 
2.50 
3.00 
5.00 
9.00 
1.00 


$ c. 

945 00 

979 12 

662 36 

1,604 47 

2,. 500 00 

1,187 50 

1,350 00 

450 00 

700 00 

300 00 

762 50 

2,363 09 

2,300 00 

300 00 

899 98 

2,249 50 

270 00 

300 00 

500 00 

1,899 98 

970 00 

624 33 
1,683 73 

850 00 
745 13 
5,000 00 
653 37 
474 87 
500 00 

625 00 
699 96 
999 84 

3.260 50 

450 00 

449 87 

2,485 02 

4,309 57 

1,600 00 

683 81 

500 00 

2,880 47 

500 00 

1,200 00 

100 00 

1,170 00 

1,247 52 

675 00 

1,487 36 

1,494 89 

650 00 

839 95 

1 ,709 74 

200 00 


1 














5 
2 

1 
17 

] 


wood . . . 
cedar. . . 


1.00 


2 




stone . . . 


25 


4 


24 


cedar. 


3 




concrete 
wood . . . 




4 














5 














wood . . . 


1.07 


6 














7 














1 
9 


cedar . . . 




2.00 
6.00 
5.00 
2.00 

12.00 
8.00 
1.00 
7.00 
4.00 
.75 
1.50 
2.00 

12.00 
4.00 
3.00 

11.00 

5.00 
2.00 
7.00 
4.00 
1.00 
2.00 
11.00 
1.00 
9.00 

14.00 

9.00 

1.50 

32.00 

12.00 

"2.66 
2.00 
8.00 
4.00 

4.00 

.75 

3.00 

4.50 

15.00 

16.00 

16.00 

3.00 

5.00 

12.00 

1.00 


8 




earth . . . 


50 








wood . . . 




9 














10 


50 












2 
7 

21 
1 

16 
6 
1 


wood . . . 
■wood . . . 


1.10 


11 


80 


earth . , . 
clay 


665 
261 


1 
1 


15 
33 


wood . 
cedar . 


12 


185 


cedar . . . 




13 




cedar . . . 




14 




stone . . . 
clay 


40 
709 


1 


21 


cedar. 


cedai". . . 




15 


99 


wood. . . 




16 










wood . . . 




17 




stone . . . 


30 












18 
















19 














8 
28 

8 
.16 

6 

19 
14 

5 


wood . . . 




20 


121 












cedar . . . 




21 














cedar. . . 




22 


2,500 


earth . . . 


•160 


5 


repair 


ed.... 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


1.00 


23 

24 








2 
1 


27 
16 


wood . 
wood . 


wood . . . 




25 


310 


earth . . . 


603 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


i.75 


26 
27 


160 
















28 


198 


earth . . . 


150 








11 
11 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


.50 


29 










30 


30 














.25 


31 




rock .... 
rock .... 


10 
549 


1 
5 


repair 
16 


ed.... 
cedar. 


35 

12 
3 

4 

28 
38 


wood . . . 


32 


3,418 


cedar. .. 
concrete 
cedar. . . 
wood . . . 


3.00 
*"!25 


33 
34 




rock 

earth . . . 
stone . . . 


50 

1,101 

630 








35 


568 


2 

1 


25 
14 


wooti . 
wood . 


36 




wood,. . . 




37 


700 




1.10 


38 




clay. ... 
earth . . . 
earth . . . 


74 
800 
150 












39 










10 
25 
13 

6 


cedar . . . 




40 


68 


1 


16 


wood . 


wood . . . 




41 




wood . . . 




42 




stone, .. 


118 








metal . . 




43 














44 


310 


earth. .. 


1,852 








8 
•4 
11 
18 
5 
9 


cedar. .. 




45 










cedar. . . 




46 


580 












wood . . . 




47 




earth. .. 
earth . . . 


599 
163 








wood . . . 
wood . . . 


.25 


48 


2,080 


2 


27 


wood . 


49 


518 


wood . . . 




50 


















51 


715 


earth . . . 


62 



4 


18 


wood . 


4 

1 


wood . . . 




52 




wood , . . 




53 



10 L.F. 



138 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 





TOWNSHIP 


CLEARED 

AND 
STUMPED 


GRADED 


SURFACED 


S 


5^ 


re 




re 


1 

s 


5^ 


re 


54 


Hinchinbrooke By-law No 5 






553 

510 

2,380 

880 

30 

420 

280 

184 

284 

34 


16 
24 
14 
22 
18 
16 
16 
18 
14 
22 


grave] 
gravel 
gi-avel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
C. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
clay 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravei 
gravel 
rock 
gravel 
shale 
gravei 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
0. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


967 
340 

1,031 
508 
80 
370 
200 
230 
280 
165 
345 
111 
543 

1,673 
944 
924 
320 
752 
816 
118 
580 

1,028 
605 
695 
791 
340 
348 

1,130 
212 
700 
505 
160 

1,177 

1.145 

882 

2,520 

680 

730 

2,765 

400 

351 

40 

675 

720 

1.454 

265 

1,363 

2,440 

1.190 

765 

320 

143 

564 

583 


5 


55 


Horton By-law No. 274 






6 


56 


Howland By-law No. 159 






5 


57 

58 


Hudson By-law No. 80 

Humphrey By-law No. 361 


160 


10 


7 
7 


59 


Hungerford By-law No. 239 






7 


60 
61 
62 


Huntingdon By-law No. 419 

Jaffray & Melick By-law No. 106 

Jame^ By-law 'No. 112 


'**266 


**20 


7 
5 
8 


63 
64 


Jocelyn By-law No. 303 

Johnson B,y4aw (No. A102 

Joly By-law No. 174 


280 

152 

97 


24 
16 
20 


6 
6 


65 


142 
111 

1,520 
170 

1,034 

80 

115 

1,200 
250 
920 
548 
485 

5,500 
138 
460 
144 

2,840 
734 

3.418 

1,098 
600 

1,432 

3,620 

349 
2,890 


20 
20 
24 
16 
16 
14 
18 
18 
14 
16 
18 
16 
14 
18 
16 
18 
20 
16 
18 
16 
14 
16 
16 

20 
12 


6 


66 


Keppel By-law No 9 


6 


67 


Kerns By-law No. 174 






B 


68 


Laird By-law No. 129 






5 


69 


Lavallee 


170 


66 


a 


70 


Limerick By-law No. 1 


7 


71 


Lindsay By-law No. 300 


40 
200 


10 
14 


ft 


72 


Macaulay By-law No. 68 


5 


73 


Machar By-law No. 765 


5 


74 


Madoc By-law No 47 






7 


75 


Mara By-law No. 568 






6 


76 
77 


Marmora &.Lake By-Jaw No. 546 

Martland By-law No. 139 


20 


14 


7 
6 


78 


Matchedash By-law No. 204 .... 






7 


79 


Mayo By-law No. 328 


80 


20 


6 


80 


Medonte By-law No. 572 


7 


81 
82 


Medora & Wood By-law No. 337 

Minden By-law No. 329 


200 
617 
200 
479 


25 

7 

50 
8 


5 
5 


83 


Monck By-law No. 466 


8 


84 


Monmouth By-law No. 246 


5 


85 


Monteagle & Herscliel By-law No. 495. 

Morley & Pattullo By-law No. 198 

Muskoka By-law No. 293 


7 


86 
87 


1,120 
490 


66 

40 


6 
5 


88 


McDonald, Meredith & Aberdeen Addi- 
tional By-law No. 146 \ 


6 


89 


McDougall By-law No. 170 


10 


12 


7 


90 


Mclrvine By-law No 226 


6 


91 


Neebing By-law No. 385 


640 


40 


1,000 
880 


16 

20 


6 


92 


Neelon & Garson By-Jaw No. 138.... 


n 


93 


North Algona By-law No. 15 






10 


m 


North Crosby By-law No. 530 






251 
1,680 
1,272 

880 
396 
168 
381 
1,780 
640 
160 


16 
20 
15 
20 
18 
20 
14 
18 
12 
20 


7 


95 


O'Connor By-law No. 171 


720 
1,049 
1,440 


15 
15 
10 


7 


96 


Olden By-law No. 54B 


9 


97 


Oliver By-law No. 187 


7 


98 


Orillia By-law No. 970 


5 


99 


Oro By-law No. 454 


17 

75 

240 


20 
16 
40 


5 


100 


Oso By-law No. 161 


5 


101 


Paipoonge By-law No. 168 


7 


102 


Palmerston & Canonto By-law No. 244. 
Plummer Additional By-law No. 167.. 


8 


103 






5 


104 


Portland By-law No. 623 






10 


105 


Prince By-law No. 79 


10 

109 

81 


12 
7 

8 






6 


106 




204 
387 


18 
16 


6 


107 
108 


Ratter & Dunnet By-law No. 26 

Rayside iBy-law No. 233 


6 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



139 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1920. 



DITCHRD 


CUT OR 


FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 




c 


i 






'3 
S 


2 3 


1 

a 


1 

i «2 


Is 


a 


1 




160 


earth . . . 


145 








3 
8 
2 
5 


wood . . . 




4.00 
2.00 
8.00 
3.00 
.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
.25 
2.00 
6.00 
4.00 
4.00 
1.00 
3.00 
5.00 
1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
2.00 

18.00 
3.00 
2.50 
2.00 

10.00 
5.00 

12.00 
6.00 
2.50 
4.00 

15.00 

4.00 
14.00 
2.13 
3.00 
10.00 
1.25 
2.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
1.50 
5.00 
8.00 
4.00 
4.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.50 
3.00 
.10 


1,400 00 
878 82 

1,000 00 
600 00 
225 00 
324 82 
275 00 

1,081 04 

1,235 11 
600 00 

399 75 
175 00 
695 52 

2,386 68 

994 47 

1,999 80 

400 00 
1,250 00 

500 00 
300 00 
599 02 

1.250 00 
750 00 
998 8,S 
612 47 
500 00 
745 37 

1,070.00 
690 00 

1,280 00 
662 42 
592 87 

2,750 00 

1,000 00 

749 75 
3,059 91 

500 00 

3.099 50 
1,999 42 

200 00 

599 12 

1,889 58 

750 00 
1,250 00 

2.100 00 
464 52 
975 00 

4,353 35 

1,000 00 

800 00 

750 00 

388 00 

1,119 95 


54 










C. iron, 
wood'. . . 




55 




earth . . . 
stone. .. 


60 
10 


1 


repair 


ed . . . . 


56 


(iOO 


wood . . . 




57 


78 












58 














2 

1 
15 
4 
8 
1 
1 


metal .. 
cedar. . . 




59 














60 


238 
560 


clay 

earth.. . 
earth . . . 
earth. .. 
earth . . . 
stone . . . 


40 
100 
200 
225 

60 
350 


1 


16 


timb'r 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


.75 


61 
62 


197 








wood . . . 




63 


207 








tile 




64 


34 








cedar. .. 


30 


65 










66 


18 


1 


12 


wood . 


2 
3 
3 

5 


wood . . . 




67 


180 


earth. .. 
clay 


30 
627 


wood . . . 




68 


208 








wood . . . 
cedar . . . 


1.25 


69 










70 




stone . . . 
earth. .. 
earth . . . 


20 

200 

52 












71 


• 


1 


12 


cedar. 


13 
2 
1 
1 
1 

17 

2 

10 

1 

17 
24 
26 
20 
5 

16 
24 

1 
16 


wood . . . 




72 




cedar . . . 




73 


; 








cedar . . . 




74 




gravel . . 


180 








wood . . . 




75 










cement . 
wood . . . 




76 














77 














metal . . . 




78 














cedar. . . 




79 




stone . . . 


187 








metal . . . 




80 










metal. . . 




81 


46 












wood . . . 




82 








1 
1 


12 

i-epair 


wood . 
ed.... 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


'".'7.5 


83 


38 






84 




stone . . . 
clay .... 
earth . . . 


80 

676 

60 


cedar . . . 




85 


457 


1 

4 


12 
12 


timber 
wood . 


wood . . . 
wood. . . 


3.50 


86 
87 




wood . . . 




88 














wood . . . 




89 


















90 




earth. .. 


1,600 








11 
3 


wood . . . 
wood . . . 


2.00 


91 


1,000 








92 


















93 




















94 


66 
303 


earth . . . 
.stone . . . 

clay 

earth . . . 
earth. .. 
stone . . . 


663 
223 
400 
238 
1.488 
107 


1 
1 


16 
30 


cedar, 
cedar. 


30 

10 
8 
5 
3 

13 
9 

18 


wood . . . 
cedar . . . 


1.00 


95 
96 


266 


cedar. . . 




97 


10 








metal . . . 




98 










metal . . . 




99 










wood . . . 




100 


80 








wood . . . 
metal . . . 


.75 
.25 


101 


600 


earth. .. 
earth . . . 


190 
30 








102 


140 








103 
















104 


85 


earth . . . 
stone . . . 
stone . . . 
earth . . . 


80 
(539 
100 
200 








2 


wood . . . 




105 














lOfi 


85 








28 


wood . . , 




1 000 00 107 














82 86 108 



140 



EEPOET OF THE 



^^0. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 



a: 


TOWNSHIP 


CLEARED 

AND 
STUMPED 


GRADED 


SURFACED 


P3 


-UTS 








"u 


MS 




109 


Richmond By-law No. 668 






320 

2,800 
875 


16 
18 
24 


C. stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
grave] 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
clay 

gravel 
gi-avel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

C. slone 
gravel 
gravel 
gi-avel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

C. stone 
gravel 
gravel 


640 

2,900 
984 
585 

1.361 
570 

1,018 
90 

1,354 
445 
421 

3,036 
575 
383 
629 
213 
578 
278 
130 
186 
90 
499 

575 

1,326 

1,334 

170 

352 

547 

570 

600 

280 

1,168 

2,040 

3,381 

743 

702 

480 

400 

75 


1? 


110 


IRidout By-law No. 39 






8 


111 


Ross By-law No. 370 






6 


112 


St. Edmunds By-law No. 242 






.5 


113 


St. Joseph By-law No. 441 . ! 


320 
20 


20 
12 


195 
30 
172 
610 
357 
397 
845 

7,496 
814 
184 
286 

5,480 
434 

1,295 

1,000 
490 
110 
499 

95 

1,246 

738 

80 


20 
22 
16 
14 
16 
16 
14 
16 
14 
16 
16 
16 
30 
16 
20 
16 
15 
18 

20 
16 

20 
20 


7 


114 
115 


Sandfield By4aw No. 247 

Sarawak By-law No. 6 


6 

7 


116 


Sebastopol By-law No. 299 


150 


20 


8 


117 


Sheffield By-law No. 650 


7 


118 


Sherborne By-law No 286 


202 
685 
692 
358 


8 

30 
20 

8 


6 


119 
120 


Sherwood Jones & Burns By-law No. 20. 
Shuniah By-Law No. 452 


8 
6 


121 


Snowdon By-law No. 203 


6 


122 


Somerville By-law No. 720 


5 


123 


South Crosby 'By-law No. 869 






5 


124 


Springer By-law No. 309 






5 


125 


Stafford By-law No. 699 






8 


126 


Stanhope By-law No. 359 


124 


6 


6 


127 


Stisted By-law No. 246 


10 


128 


/S'torrington By-law No. 483 






8 


129 


Strong By-law No. 411 






11 


130 


Sunnidale By-law No. 490 


70 

35 

900 


8 

12 

8 


6 


131 


Tarbutt & Tarbutt Additional By-law 
No. 2A 


6 


132 


Tarentorus By-law No. 198 


6 


133 


Tay By-law No. 786 


7 


134 


Thessalon By-law No. 11 


60 


40 


5 


135 


•Thompson By-law No. 117 


5 


136 


Tiny By-law No. 607 






1,287 

80 

550 

480 

629 

5,890 


1 18 

1 20 

14 

! 16 

18 

20 


7 


137 


Tisdale By-law No. 208 






10 


138 
139 


Tudor & Cashel By-law No. 8 

Tyendinaga By-law No. 693 


20 


20 


7 

7 


140 


Vespra By-law No. 629 






7 


141 


Watt By-law No. 535 


100 


45 


10 


142 


Westmeath By-law No. 240 


7 


143 


Widdifield By-law No. 300 


13 


16 


756 
647 


24 
18 


1? 


144 


Wilberforce By-law No. 477 


7 


145 


Wolfe Island By-law No. 480 






8 


146 


Wollaston By-law No 2 


80 
320 


40 
66 


560 
133 


14 

28 


7 


147 


Worthington By-law No. 96 


5 




Total 






24,750 


.... 


163,850 






109407 















192021 



DEPARTxMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



141 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1920. 



DITCHKI) 


CUT OR 


FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


n 


o 


caw 




11 




a >. 

3 . 
O 3 

< 


1 

a 

a; 


-♦•3 


3 

1 


B 


s 


n 




















2.00 
9.10 
4.50 
2.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
2.00 
5.00 
2.50 
2.00 

25.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 

18.00 
2.00 
4.50 
4.00 
1.75 
1.00 
1.60 
2.00 

4.50 

5.00 

.50 

1.25 

5.00 

2.00 

3.00 

2.00 

5.00 

20.00 

11.00 

2.10 

3.00 

1.60 

.3.00 

.50 


2,000 00 

1,600 00 

1.350 00 

500 00 

1,600 00 

500 00 

1,500 00 

300 00 

992 55 

826 10 

900 00 

3,850 00 

690 00 

686 45 

404 91 

555 52 

540 00 

438 44 

200 00 

725 75 

229 54 


109 














2 
2 


wood 


110 






earth. .. 


164 








metal 


111 














112 




100*^n'"t>> 


22 












113 








3 


repair 


ed.... 


2 
3 


wood 


114 




earth . . . 


172 


metal . . . 




115 














116 














8 
9 
5 

17 

17 

9 


wood . . . 




117 




27 

380 

285 

40 

18 












cedar. . . 




118 














cedar. .. 
wood . . . 
wood . . . 
wood . . . 


1.00 
.50 


119 


. 


earth . . . 
earth. .. 
stone . . . 


1,066 
90 
10 


2 


19 


plank 


120 
121 


^K,' 


1 


12 


cem'nt 


122 


^B 






123 


^B:' 


















124 


^Ht' 
















2.00 


125 


^^B 


stone . . . 


80 








9 
3 
3 
4 
2 
1 

4 
4 
1 
1 
8 
2 
7 


wood . . . 


126 


^^m 








wood . . . 




127 


^^B' 


325 


earth . . . 
stone . . . 


50 
300 








metal 

wood 


128 


^^B 








129 


^K 


397 
60 

72 

85 
80 
23 
75 
640 








cedar . . . ! 


600 00 130 


^^B 












wood ... 


499 37 

2,497 34 
1,704 76 


131 


■ 


earth. .. 

clay 

earth. .. 


1,974 
124 
454 


2 


57 


cedar . 


metal .. 
metal .. 
metal .. 
stone . . . 


.25 
"*!25 


132 
ls.3 


^B 








300 00 134 










,300 00' 135 


H 


earth . . . 


2,152 


1 


40 


wood . 


metal .. 
wood . . . 





1,498 46 

3,136 01 

790 04 

449 82 


136 
137 


^Hi 












cedar . . . 




138 


^He 
















1.39 


^^B" 


52 


earth... 


293 








3 
20 


metal .. 
cedar. .. 




1,100 00 140 




3 


10 


plank 


1.600 00 141 


^^H- 










1,484 85 142 




earth... 


1,250 


i 




1 
1 
6 

1 


wood . . . 




1,500 OOi 143 


^Hi' 






metal .. 
cement . 
metal .. 


"i'.oo 


900 OOi 144 








2! io 

i 


cem'nt 


750 OOi 145 


^^K 


earth. .. 


200 


780 96j 146 


^^F 






675 OOi 147 


^^H 






■ 










" -_ 


^B ^^ 


,817 




26,512 


58 






1,005 




24.82 


718.63 


162,552 25 













143 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 



MISCBIiLANEOUS EXPENDITURES, COLONIZATION ROADS. 

Services. Expenditures. 
1. Inspection of Roads and Bridges $15,548 42 



2. Storage of Tools (W. W. Pringle) $2 00 

Storage of Tools (B. R. McMullin) - 36 00 

Rent of Storehouse (W. E. Kerr) 72 00 



3. Compensation for Injuries: 

E. L. Bell $41 25 

L. S. Walker 258 00 

L. L. Martin 18 15 

N. Leclaire 98 18 

T. H. Webster 35 57 

4. Conference expenses ((Road Inspectors) $1,185 20 

5. Conference expenses $37 50 

6. Mud Creek Bridge $478 75 

7. Surveys: 

Feronia to Widdifleld Road $577 55 

Mat'tagami River Bridge 210 00 

German Township Road 54 00 

Porcupine Road 432 95 

Feronia Road 35 00 

Miscellaneous 32 00 

8. Road Account, 1919 (Fulkoskie) ■ $30 22 

9. Rental of right-of-way (C.P.R.) $2 00 

10. Purchase of machinery, etc: 

Northern Canada Supply Co. (steam drill) $275 00 

Freight on grader 10 50 

Toronto Motor Car Co. (motor car) 1,035 86 

McLaughlin Motor Car Co. (repairs to car) 33 85 

J. H. Biehl (motor car) 990 00 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. (tires) 117 97 

11. Road Accounts, 1919: 

Feronia Road $30 75 

Palmerston Township Road 27 50 

Calabogie Graphite Mine Road 136 23 

Field Roadi 202 50 

Griffith and Matawatchan Road 10 00 

Sherwood and Jones Road 10 00 

Nepowassan Road 10 00 

Hagar and St. Charles Road 768 25 

Gorham Township Road 108 12 

Clarendon and Palmerston Road 3 40 

Bagot and B,lythfield Road 25 00 

iSomerville Township Road 19 95 

Balfour Morgan Road 9 20 

Franklin Township Road 24 42 

Matchedash Township Road 17 55 

Ware Township Road 40 75 

Inspection October, 1919 171 75 



$15,548 42 



$110 00 



$451 15 

$1,185 20 

$37 50 

$478 75 



$1,341 50 
$30 22 

$2 00 



$2,463 18 



$1,615 37 
$23,263 29 



1920 21 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



143 



I 6 




.— rv) rr 


^ 








EXPENDI- 
TURE 


•>ff Iff 34 
«0 CM rj 

rc >i ?? 

*9-C5 Iff i2 

a; Iff ?.i 

Iff' ivj cvf 

^ CO w 

CM -- 


00 

OC 

Iff 

-1" 




o 


CO 


505.00 
718.63 


: ^ 




New Road 

miles 


77.02 
24.82 


00 




Culverts 
number 


1,064 
1,005 


• 33 




i 


5 


CV5 CC 

ro Iff 


03 




Cut 
and 
fill 


cu. yds. 


44.974 
26,512 


t— 




Ditched 


CO 

-3 

o 

^4 


21.163 
21,817 


O 
OC 

03 




Surfaced 


CO 

'3 
p 


79.065 
10f>,407 


CM 

-f 

OC 

JC • 




Graded 

and 
shaped 


CO 

-3 


122,825 
163,850 


Iff 

i 




Cleared 

and 
stumped 


CO 


Direct Grants and Drainage. . . 44 ,458 

By-law Grants 24.750 

Miscellaneous Kxnenditures 


OC 

c 






RECAPITULATION 


C 






6 




rH CM CY3 











144 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 44' 
To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

SiE, — I have the honour to submit to you the report on the construction and 
maintenance of highways and bridges, under the provisions of the Northern and 
North Western Ontario Development Act, 1912, and amendments, during the season 
ending 31st October, 1920. 

Operations were carried on in the Districts of Eainy Eiver, Kenora and 
Thunder Bay, the Sub-districts of Sault Ste. Marie, St. Joseph's Island and Mani- 
toulin, the Districts of Algoma, Sudbury, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Muskoka and 
Timiskaming, the Counties of Eenfrew and Simcoe and in Algonquin Park. In 
the detailed report following, the District of Timiskaming is shown in sub-divisions 
as follows: Cochrane, Englehart, Kapuskasing and Hearst, Matheson, and 
Porcupine. 

The North Bay-Toronto, Mattawa-Pembroke and other trunk roads traversing 
more than one district have been shown separately in the detailed report and only 
works completely in a district are shown under that district heading, the districts 
being placed in alphabetical order. 

The sudden death of Mr. Whitson, on June T2th, 1920, coming at a time when 
early summer organization and re-organization was under way, rendered the matter 
of arranging efficient supervision a difficult undertaking without an actual cessation 
of activities for a time, but the work was carried on as efficiently as possible under 
the circumstances and supervised by the then existing staff without additions. 

In conclusion, I would add, as in former reports, that the Department's organ- 
ization should include considerably more technically trained and experienced road 
makers to advise and direct the actual work carried on in the various districts. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLEETON-, 

Director, Northern Development Branch. 
Toronto, October 31st, A.D. 1920. 



ALGONQUIN PAEK. 

On the Minessing Eoad from Algonquin Park Station to Minessing Camp, a 
distance of 71/2 miles, 214 miles brushed out and 3 miles widened by tree cutting 
8 ft. wide, 200 ft. lineal of crosslaying, 300 ft. of ditching, l/^ mile of ditches 
cleaned, 125 loads of stone used for filling, 18 culverts constructed, and 2,503 
cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repairs, and the whole distance kept 
dragged. . ! 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



145 



MATTAWA-PEMBHOEE EOAD. 

From Chalk Eiver Bridge to Tuckers Creek Bridge, in the Townships of 
Buchanan and Wylie, about 4 miles of this road were brushed out, stumped, grubbed, 
and graded, 14 iron culverts were installed, two bridges repaired, and 2,400 cu. yds. 
of gravel used in surfacing. 

In the Townships of Petawawa and Alice from Pembroke to Petawawa, 5 
miles were dragged and the whole 10 miles repaired with gravel. 

West of Chalk Eiver, in the Townships of Buchanan, Wylie and Ealph, II/2 
miles covered with 300 loads of cinders, 4 miles dragged, 2 new culverts installed, 
several repaired, and 130 cu. yds. gravel used in general repairs. 

In the Townships of Papineau and Cameron, from Mattawa to Klock, a dis- 
tance of 15 miles, 2y2 miles cut out, 414 miles stumped and grubbed, 8 miles 
graded, 1,820 ft. ditching, 9 miles dragged, 1,452 cu. yds. of gravel used in sur- 
facing and repairs, 2 timber, 1 stone, and 13 iron culverts installed. 




Mattawa-Pembroke Road. 



EOAD FEOM NOETH BAY TO SUDBUEY. 



On the the 24-mile section between North Bay and Sturgeon Falls, 151/^ miles 
brushed, 2,586 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 9,560 ft. ditching, 

3 culverts repaired, and 4 miles dragged. 

From Sturgeon Falls to Verner, a distance of ten miles, 321 cu. yds. of gravel 
used in repairing 3 miles across Lots 1 to 6, Township of Caldwell, 1,971 cu. yds. 
of gravel on the 6 miles east of Verner, and in the Township of Springer, on the 

4 miles west of Sturgeon Falls, 1 iron culvert was installed, 1 culvert rip-rapped 
with 10 loads of stone, and 1,477 cu. yds. gravel used in repairs and re-surfacing. 
From 1 mile east of Cache Bay to 3 miles west of Cache Bay 510 cu. yds. of gravel 
was used in surfacing and repairs. 



146 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



In the Townships of Caldwell and Kirkpatriek, 8 miles were repaired using 
1,075 cu. yds. of gravel. In Kirkpatriek Township, between Kirk and Warren, 
181 cu. yds. of gravel were used in repairs over a distance of 5 miles. In Dunnett 
Township, the road for 4 miles east and 3 miles west of Warren was repaired with 
989 cu. yds. of gravel. 

From Warren to Hagar the road for 5 miles, in the Township of Hagar, was 
repaired with 104 yards gravel, and the culverts were also repaired. 

On the 6 miles east of Markstay, in Hagar and Ratter Townships, the ditches 
were cleaned and road repaired with 388 yds. gravel. 

Between Markstay and Stinson, 7 miles were brushed out, 121 yds. of clay 
used in fill, 200 cu. yds. of stone and 692 yds. of gravel were used in surfacing 
and repairs — this work was in the Townships of Hagar and Awrey. 

Between Stinson and Wahnapitae. 7 miles of road were repaired with 192 cu. 
yds. of gravel and the culverts repaired. 

The 4 miles from Wahnapitae to Coniston were repaired, 455 cu. yds. of gravel 
and 11 loads of stone being used. 

From Coniston to Sudbury, 8 miles repaired with 304 cu. yds. of gravel and 
3 iron culverts installed. 

TRUNK ROAD, NORTH BAY TO TORONTO. 

County of Simcoe : 

In the Township of North Orillia, 3 miles were graded, 11 iron culverts con- 
structed and 7,976.5 cu. yds. of crushed stone used in surfacing, the distance 
covered being about 7 miles. 

District of Musi-oka : 

From 3 miles south to 3 miles north of Gravenhurst, in the Township of 
Muskoka, general repairs were candied out, using 510 cu. yds. of gravel, and .15 
mile was brushed out. 

From lot 1, Concession 10, Macaulay, to lot 25, Concession " A," Monck, a 
distance of 1% miles, 800 cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing. 

Between Bracebridge and Falkenburg, in the Township of Monck, between 
Concessions 8 and 9, 973 cu. yds. of crushed rock used in surfacing over a mile 
of road. 

On lot 9, Concession 6, Township of Stephenson at the end of Long Lake, 
825 cu. yds. of rock cut to widen road through cuts. Between lots 20 and 21, 
Concession 10, 60 cu. yds, of rock quarried for bridge. From Utterson north to 
lot 30, Concession 12, V^ mile stumped and grubbed, 3% miles graded, 2,234 cu, 
yds, gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 800 ft. ditching, and 31/^ miles dragged. 
From lot 30, Concession 12, Stephenson, north to Huntsville, in Township of 
€haffey, 11/2 miles grubbed, 41/2 miles graded, 1,090 cu. yds, gravel used in surfac- 
ing, 5,700 ft. ditching, 3 stone culverts constructed and 11^ miles dragged. 

From Melissa in Concession 10, Chaffey, northwards to Scotia Junction in 
Concession 8, Township of Perry, District of Parry Sound, 8.5 miles dragged, 3 
miles graded, 927 cu, yds, gravel used in surfacing, and 1,000 ft. ditching. 

In the Township of Chaffey, % mile cut oilt, stumped and grubbed, 31/^ miles 
graded, 5,127 cu, yds. gravel used in surfacing over 10 miles, 5,158 ft. ditching, 
2 timber, 4 stone and 5 iron culverts constructed, 1 temporary bridge erected, 1.5 
miles dragged; and 155 yds, of stone used in approach to bridge. 



192021 



DEPAETMENT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS. 



147 



District of Parry Sound: 
Township of Perry: 

From 114 miles north of Xovar to northern boundary of township, a distance 
of about li miles, 14 miles brushed out and dragged. One timber culvert con- 
structed, 420 ft. ditched and 149 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

In the Township of Armour, south of Burks Falls, 3i/^ miles graded, 141 
€u. yds. gravel used in repairs, 2 culverts repaired, 3^/4 miles dragged, and wash- 
outs filled. 




Baysville-Bracebridge Road (Muskoka). 



From Burks Falls, in Armour Township, to Powassan, in Himsworth Town- 
ship, a distance of about 35 miles, 7 miles brushed out, 14 miles graded, G30 yds. 
gravel and 676 yds. cinders used in repairs, 4 timber culverts constructed and 35 
miles dragged. 

From Powassan to North Bay, in the Townships of Himsworth and Ferris, a 
distance of about 23 miles, 4 timber culverts constructed, 91^ miles brushed out, 
171 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 2i/^ miles graded and 23 miles 
dragged. 

In addition to the foregoing, the road from Burks Falls to Callander, 53 miles 
was graded up and repaired with 220 cu. yds. gravel. 



148 KEPOET OF THE . Xo. 3 

ROAD EEOM SWASTIKA TO KIRKLAND LAKE AND TOUGH OAKES 

MINES. 

This road, in the Township of Teck, District of Timiskaming, is the only 
outlet for the "^ Kirkland Lake Gold Camp " and all supplies and material have 
been transported by this route. The construction of a water bound macadam road, 
in lieu of a railroad, was commenced in the season of 1919. The work necessitated 
considerable expenditure in drainage and a number of minor diversions from the 
original travelled road were found advisable. The distance from Swastika to 
Tough Oakes is approximately 6 miles and the entire distance is now well surfaced 
with crushed stone and steam rolled, with the exception of a few hundred feet the 
surfacing material for which we were unable to secure, owing to a shut off of power 
which put the crushing plant out of business a week or so before the forced closing 
down of the work, due to snowstorms. During the season, 13,468 cu. yds. of stone 
were placed on the road covering a distance of 4.9 miles. 

COCHRANE DISTRICT. 

Township of Brower : 

Between lots 8 and 9 across Concession 4, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, 2 miles 
side ditching and 240 ft. off-take ditching. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3 across parts of lots 11 and 12, 740 feet side 
ditching and 480 ft. repairs. 

From line between lots 8 and 9 to Abitibi Station, south of C. N. Railway, 
2/5 mile cut and burned, and 5 timber culverts constructed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lot 9, 1 mile stumped and grubbed and 
5,500 ft. of side ditching. 

Between lots 6 and 7 across Concessions 3 to 6, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, 
10,520 ft. of side ditching, and 10 timber culverts constructed. 

On south side of T. & N. 0. Rralway from M.P. 2451/2 to boundary of St. 
John and Brower, also across lot 11 on St. John and Brower Townline, 1 mile cut 
and burned, 8 miles stumped and gtubbed, and 12,578 ft. of side ditching. 

Between Concessions, 4 and 5 across lot 6, i/^ mile graded, 9 timber culverts 
and 1 timber bridge constructed. 

South of C. N. Railway, across lots 7, 8 and 9, Concession 4, 4 timber culverts 
constructed. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4 across lot 9, 1/4 mile graded. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6 across lot 6, 2 timber culverts constructed. 

Townline Toivnships of Brower and Kennedy : 

Ferry across the Abitibi River on lot 5 repaired and placed in good condition. 

Townline Townships of Brower and Fox : 

On Concession 1, 4 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Calder : 

On south boundary across lots 1 and 2, 14 mile stumped, grubbed and graded. 
Between Concessions 6 and 7 across lots 17-24, 21,852 ft. of side ditching 
and 1,139 ft. of off-take ditching. - 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 149 



Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 13-15, 5,267 ft. of side ditching and 
3,855 feet of off-take ditching. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 1-3, 5,870 ft. of side ditching and 
206 ft. of off-take ditching 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 on lot 25, scow 30 ft. x 16 ft. by 2i^ ft. con- 
structed for ferry across Driftwood Eiver. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 on lot 2, 2 chains graded and one timber bridge 
constructed 102 ft. x 16 ft. x 91/2 ft. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11 on lot 16, 1 timber bridge constructed 80 ft. 
X 12 ft. X 7 ft. 

Between lots 16 and 17 across Concessions 7 to 10, 7 timber culverts con- 
structed and 1 repaired, also 3 chains of creek cleared of logs and underbrush. 

Township of Calvert : 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 3-5, 1 mile graded and 4 timber 
culverts constructed. 

Between lots 4 and 5 across Concessions 3 and 4, 1 mile cut and burned. 

From " Wye " to " Townsite," Iroquois Falls, ^4 mile graded and 4 timber 
culverts constructed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 1 and 5, 1 mile graded, 1 timber 
bridge constructed 52 ft. x 14 ft. x 7 ft., and 1 mile repaired. 

Trunk Road, Porquis Junction to Iroquois Falls, 21^ miles graded. 

Township of Clergue : 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 1-6, li/^ miles burned, 1 mile stumped 
and grubbed, l^/^ miles graded, 16 timber culverts constructed, and 788 ft. of off- 
take ditching. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6 across lots 11 and 12, 9i^ chains stumped and 
grubbed, and 3,240 ft. side ditching. 

On street from station to schoolhouse, Townsite of Porquis Junction, 3 timber 
culverts constructed, i/^ mile gravelled with 394 cu. yds. of gravel and ^ mile 
graded. 

Township of Clute: 

Between lots 12 and 13 across part of Concession 9, 5i/^ chains stumped and 
grubbed, and 1,300 ft. of side ditching. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 11 and 12, 7,186 ft. of side ditching, 
530 ft. off-take ditching, 1^ mile stumped and grubbed. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11 across lots 27 and 28, 1/10 mile stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 26 and 28, 1/12 mile stumped and 
grubbed, 3,552 ft. side ditching, 420 ft. off-take ditching, 1 culvert constructed and 
13 chains repaired. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 22 and 23, i^ mile cut and burned, 
stumped and grubbed and graded, 3,489 ft. side ditching, 116 ft. off-take ditching 
9 timber culverts and 1 timber bridge constructed 107 ft. x 12 ft. x 8 ft. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11 across lots 1-3, ^ mile stumped and grubbed, 
514 ft. of side ditching and 211 ft. of off-take ditching. 



150 EEPOET OF THE I^^^Pfif 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 4-7, % mile cut and burned, % mile 
stumped and grubbed, 4,841 ft. of side ditching, 834 ft, of off-take ditching and 
1 timber culvert constructed. 

Between lots 12 and 13 across Concession 9, 435 ft. of side ditching. 

Between lots 18 and 19 across Concession 4, 7,810 ft. of side ditching and 
643 ft. of off-take ditching. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 8 and 9, 4,572 ft. of side ditching, 
121 ft. of off-take ditching, and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lot 35, i/4 i^il© cut and burned, stumped 
and grubbed, 4,800 ft. of side ditching and 110 ft. of off-take ditching. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11 across lots 24 and 25, y^ mile stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 23-26, 1 mile graded and 6 timber 
culverts constructed. 

Between lots 12 and 13 on Concession 6, log Jam at Buskegow Bridge removed. 

Between Concessions 6 and 7 across lots 25 and 26, 4 chains graded, 1,254 ft. 
side ditching and 1 timber bridge repaired. 

From Concessions 2 and 3 to Frederick House River, south of C. N". Ey., 5 
chains graded and 1 culvert constructed. 

Townline, Toivnships of Clute and Fournier: 

Lots 4 to 7 inclusive and across Frederick House River, 2 timber bridges 
repaired, 660 ft. off-take ditching, 1 timber culvert 18 ft. x 4 ft. x 2 ft., and 1 
timber bridge 44 ft. x 10 ft. x 4 ft. constructed. 

TouDnline, Townships of Clute and Calder: 

Across Concessions 5 to 9, 7 chains graded and 2 timber culverts repaired. 

fownline, Toivnships of Clute and Glackmeyer: 

Across Concessions 3 and 4, % mile graded, 3,810 ft. of side ditching, 2,540 
ft. of off-take ditching and 5 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Dundonald : 

BetAveen lots 6 and 7 across Concession 3, % mile underbrushed. 

Township of Fox : 

Between Concessions 2 and 3 across lots 7-12, 11/^ miles cut out and % i^^il® 
burned, % mile stumped and grubbed, 3,745 ft. side ditching and 228 ft. off-take 
ditching. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 7-12, 21^ miles underbrushed, 1 mile 
stumped and grubbed, and 2 miles graded. 

Between lots 8 and 9 across Concessions 2 and 3, li/g miles cut, burned, 
stumped and grubbed. 

Between lots 4 and 5 across Concessions 2 and 3, 2 miles cut and burned. 

Townline, Townships of Fox and Pyne : 

Across lots 10-12, 14 mile underbrushed and 2 timber culverts constructed. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 151 



Toivnship of Fournier : 

Between Concessions 5 and 6 across lots 3-7, 19,400 ft. side ditching, l,49:i 
ft. off-take ditching, 2 miles underbrushed, stumped and grubbed; and across lot 3,. 
% mile stum])ed and grubbed, and 3,442 ft. of side ditching. 

Between lots 7 and 8 across Concessions 5 and 6, 2 miles of survey line cut out. 

Toicnship of German : 

Between lots 11 and 12 across Concessions 5 and 6, i/^ mile stumped, grubbed 
and graded. Dam on Frederick House Eiver at Connaught repaired. 

Townsliip of Glackmeyer: 

Between lots 21 and 22 across Concessions 3 and 4, % mile cut out 15 ft, wide, 
% mile cut out 33 ft. wide, stumped and grubbed. 

Between lots 24 and 25 across Concessions 7 and 8, 1^ miles burned, stumped 
and grubbed, and 1,492 ft. of side ditching. 

Between lots 24 and 25 across Concession 2, and between Concessions 2 and Z- 
across lots 25-28, 1% miles graded, 1,030 ft. of off-take ditching, 1 timber culvert 
constructed and % mile repaired. 

Between Concessions 6 and 7 across lots 15-18, 1 timber culvert constructed 
and 11/4 miles repaired. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lot 28, 2 chains gravelled, 33 ft. of off- 
take ditching and 1 bridge 40 ft. x 13 ft. x 6 ft. constructed. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11 across lots 13-19, i/4 mile graded, 330 ft. side 
ditching, 1 timber culvert and 1 timber bridge 30 ft. x 14 ft. x 4 ft. constructed 
and 1 bridge repaired. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 9-11, 1 timber bridge repaired anci 
1 mile of road repaired. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3 across lots 16 and 17, 3 culverts repaired and 
% mile of road repaired. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 13-17, 2 timber culverts constructed 
and 11/2 miles of road repaired. 

Toivnline, Townships of Glachmeyer and Lamarche: 

Across lots .9-11, 1 mile graded, 2 chains gravelled, 2,600 ft. of side ditching 
and 11/^ miles of road repaired. 

Township of Kennedy : 

Between lots 24 and 25 across Concessions 3 and 4, I14 miles stumped and 
grubbed, and 15,678 ft. of side ditching. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 33-34, 1 mile stumped and grubbed,, 
10,062 ft. of side ditching and 5 timber culverts constructed. 

On south boundary across lots 19-33, 3 timber culverts repaired and 5 chain? 
of road repaired. 

Towpsjiip of Lamarche : 

Across north part of lot 9, Concession 6, also across north part of lot 6, Con- 
cession 6, Lamarche, and south part of lot 19, Concession 1, Glackmeyer, 4,715 ft. 



153 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

of off-take ditching which necessitated cutting, burning stumping and grubbing 
% niile 10 ft. wide. 

Between lots 6 and 7 across Concessions 1-6, ^4 i^ile cut, stumped and grubbed, 
6 ft. wide for off-take ditch, 514 miles grading, % mile gravelling, 1,320 ft. side 
ditching, 6 timber culverts and one timber bridge constructed, 1 bridge repaired 
and 3 miles of road repaired. . 

Between lots 8 and 9 across Concession 5, % mile graded, % mile gravelled, 
198 ft. of side ditching, 5 timber culverts constructed, 2 bridges repaired, and 1^ 
miles of road repaired. 

Toivnship of Leitch : 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 1-3, 5 chains cut, burned, stumped 
and grubbed, 3,614 ft. of side ditching, 220 ft. of off-take ditching, and 5 timber 
culverts constructed. 

. Between Concessions 3 and 3 across lots 1-3, 6,600 ft. of side ditching, 1,135 
ft. of off-take ditching and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of N ewmarlcet : 

From M. P. 336 T. & X. 0. Railway north to boundary of St. John Township, 
I/5 mile cut out and % mile stumped and grubbed. 



ENGLEHART DISTRICT. 

Tomnline, Townships of Armstrong and Evanturel : 

Across lots 9-11, 3,400 ft. cut, burned, stumped and grubbed. 

Toiunline, Totvnships of Beauclmmp and DacJc: 

Across lot 3, low lying portion of road filled in and gravelled. 

Township of Boston : 

Crossing over Boston Creek near Station, 1 timber bridge constructed, 30-ft. 
span with dovetailed pierg loaded with rock. 

Township of Catharine : 

Between Concessions 1 and 3, lot 13, 14 mile stumped and grubbed, l/^ mile 
graded, 5 timber culverts constructed and 4 hills cut to improve grade. 

On lot 9, Concession 6, 1 timber bridge, 50-ft. span, constructed on the Boston 
Creek-Skead Trail, also 1 small pole bridge, span 15-ft. 

Township of ChamherJam: 

Between Concessions 3 and 4 across lots- 7 and 8, 14 mile stumped, 1 mile 
grubbed and graded, 5 timber culverts constructed and 35 yds. cross-laying 10 ft. 
wide. 

Between lots 3 and 3, Concession 1, 14 mile of road clay covered. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND EOKESTS. 153 

Between Concessions 5 and 6, lots 8, 9 and 10, between Concessions 4 and 5, 
lots 11 and 12, and between lots 10-11, Concession 5, i^ mile stumped and grubbed, 
3% miles graded, hills cut down, 7 timber culverts and 2 timber bridges constructed. 

Townline, Townships of Chamberlain and Pacaud: 

On lot 1 a 60-ft. span bridge was partially reconstructed, work being still in 
progress at the close of year. 

Townline, Townships of Chamberlain and Dack : 
Across lot 2, yi mile gravelled. 

Township of Dack : 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 3 and 4, V2 i^^il^ side ditches cleaned 
out, boulders removed from road, and 4 rods of road raised with gravel. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4 across lots 5 and 6, road dragged 1 mile. 

Between Concessions- 3 and 4, lot 7, washout on hills and approach to culvert 
filled in and grade of hills reduced. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 5 and 6, 100 yds. of road cut out, 
stumped and temporary culverts constructed. 

Townline, Townships of Dack and Evanturel : 

Across Concession 6, 1,322 ft. gravelled 6i/^ ft. wide, 2 spans on High Falls 
bridge re-constructed. 

Townline, Townships of Dack and Beauchamp : 

On lot 2, low lying portion of road filled in with gravel. 

Township of Evanturel : 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lot 12, i/^ mile cut out, stumped, grubbed and 
graded, 3 timber culverts constructed and 2 hills cut down. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6 lot 10, washout on approach to bridge repaired ^ 
bridge piles spliced, pier re-sheeted, and cut water plates installed. 

Township of Ingram : 

Across Concession 2, lots 6 and 7, 2,700 ft. side ditching. 
Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 3, i/^ mile stumped and graded, 150 yds, 
gravelled 6 ft. wide, and 1 timber culvert constructed. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lots 1 and 2, 1,280 ft. gravelled 61/^ ft. wide. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 2, 693 ft. gravelled 6i/^ ft, wide. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4, off-take ditch cleaned out to drain trunk road. 

Township of Mickle : 

Covering repaired on 2 bridges over Bear Creek on Elk T^ake-Gowganda Eoad. 

Township of Marquis : 

Across lots 1 to 7, 41^ miles cut out 66 ft. wide. 



154 REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Townline, Townships of Savard and Sharpe: 

Across Conciessions 1 and 2, 2 miles graded with ditcher and 1 timber culvert 
constructed. This work not quite completed. 

Township of Marter: 

Between Concessions 3 and i, across lots 5 to 8, 3 miles graded, 5 timber 
culverts constructed, side hills cut and grades reduced. 

Township of Pilcaud: 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lots 5 to 8, 2 miles cut out 66 ft. wide. 

Between lots 4 and 5, Concessions 1 and 2 and between Concessions 2 and 3, 
lots 5 and 6, 1 mile stumped and. grubbed, 2 miles graded, 3 timber culverts con- 
structed, approaches to bridge renewed, side hills cut and grades reduced. 

Townline, Townships of Pacaud. and Boston: 

Across lots 11 and 12 to Rosegrove spur, 2^/4 miles cut out Q>(S ft. wide. 

Toivnship of Bohillard: 

Between lots 8 and 9, Concession 4, 1 mile stumped 20 ft. wide. 

Between lots 8 and 9, Concession 2, 2 miles graded, 1,500' ft. off-take ditching, 
20 culverts constructed, and grades reduced. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 6 and between Concessions 5 and 6, lots 2, 
3 and 4, 1/2 mile stumped and grubbed, 2% miles graded, and 5 timber culverts 
constructed. 

Between lots 8 and 9, Concession 6, 14 mile stumped and grubbed, V2 i^'^^ 
graded, 3 timber culverts constructed, and grade reduced on 2 hills. 

Toivnship of Savard : 

Between lots 6 and 7, across Concessions 3 and 4, 14 niile stumped, % niile 
graded, 3 timber culverts constyucted, and grade reduced on 6 hills. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5, across lot 6, i/^ mile stumped, grubbed and 
graded, 4 timber culverts constructed, and 50 ft. of cross-laying 10 ft. Avide. 

Toivnship of Sliarpe : 

Between Concessions 1 and 2, lot 1, i/^ mile stumped and grubbed, and 1 mile 
■of side ditching. 

KAPUSKASING AND HEARST DISTRICT. 

Triml' Pioad along C. N. Railway: 

In the Townships of O'Brien and Owens," from M.P. 64 to M.P. 73, 300 ft. 
graded 22 ft. wide, 8,500 feet side ditching, 2,000 ft. of off-take ditch, 10 timber 
culverts constructed, 71/2 miles repaired and dragged, 8,500 ft. re-ditchiug, 3,000 
ft. of muskeg surfaced with clay, and approaches to 3 culverts filled. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 155 

I'vMnJc Road, Ryland to Hearst: 

In the Townships of Way and Hanlan, 1 mile graded, 2,000- ft. muskeg covered 
with cla}', 2,000 ft. side ditching, 2 timber culverts constructed, 8 miles dragged 
and 6 culverts re-covered. 

Toionsliip of Casgrain: 

Between lots 24 and 25, across part of Concession 1, 3,000 ft. re-ditched. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, across lot 16, 1,000 ft. graded, 1 timber culvert 
constructed, and approach to 1 culvert filled. 

Between lots 18 and 19, across part of Concession 3, •1,250 ft. ditched, 2 timber 
culverts constructed, and approaches to culverts filled. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, across part of lot 23, 1,000 ft. ditched. In 
addition to the foregoing, 10 culverts in various locations were re-covered. 

Boundary Line, Townships of Casgra.in and Kendall: 

Across lot 25 and part of lot 27, 5,000 ft. side ditching and 5,000 ft. re-ditched. 

Township of Kendall: 

Between Concessions 6 and 7, across lot 28, 3,330 ft. side ditching. 

Between Concessions 6 and 7, across lot 26, 1,665 ft. cut, burned and grubbed 
66 ft. wide, 3,330 ft. side ditching and 500 ft. off -take ditching. 

Between Concessions 8 and 9, across lots 27 and 28, 5,630 ft. side ditched. 

Between lots 24 and 25, across part of Concession 12, 4,000 ft. side ditched. 

In addition to the foregoing, a bridge was constructed over Mattawishquia 
River at Ninth Street, Hearst, and the approaches filled and graded. Cinders were 
placed on 2,400 ft. of approaches to railway crossing, and 21/^ miles of trunk road 
along railway repaired between M.P. 125, and M.P. 129. 

Boundary Line, Totvnships of Kendall and Way : 

At railway crossing, 1,400 ft. grading 22 ft. wide, 400 ft. of off-take ditch 
and 2 concrete culverts 38 in. diameter. 

Toionship of Fauquier : 

Between lots 12^ and 13, across Concessions 3 to 6, % mile cut out, 3% miles 
burned and grubbed, 9 temporary bridges constructed, 5% miles of side ditching, 
and 1/2 mile off -take ditching. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5, across lots 6 to 12 and between lots 6 and 7, 
across Concessions 3 and 4, 31^ miles cut out and grubbed. 

Boundary Line, Toumships of Ilanlan and Way: 

Across lots 4, 5, 6 and 7, 3l^ miles side ditching and 3,000 ft. off-take ditching. 

Township of O'Brien: 

Between lots 24 and 25, across part of Concession 10, 1,300 ft. ditching and 
1.300 ft. re-ditchino-. 



156 REPOET OF THE No. 3 

Between Concessions 8 and 9, across part of lot 22, 250 ft. ditching and 250 ft. 
re-ditching. 

Township of Shackleton : 

Between Concessions 10 and 11, across lots 23 to 27, 1,980 ft. cut out. 
Between lots 24 and 25, across Concessions 7 and 8 and between Concessions 
6 and 7, across lots 22 to 24, 4,620 ft. cut out. 



KENOEA DISTRICT. 
Kenora — Pellatt Road: 

From Tunnel! Island, at Kenora, to the line between lots 11 and 12, Conces- 
sion 4, Pellatt Township, a distance of about 14 miles, this road was kept dragged, 
4 miles were cut out, % mile stumped and grubbed, 13^2 miles graded or re-graded, 
5,300 ft. ditched, 12 timber culverts constructed and 12 repaired, and 2,475 cu. 
yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repairing. 

Two miles of road on the line between lots 8 and 9, Concessions 3 and 4, known 
ias Sandy Lake Eoad, were included in the operations enumerated in the foregoing 
paragraph. 

East Melich and Charleshois Roads : 

From mining claim K104 north easterly across the Mandarin mining location, 
etc., to the line between lots 12 and 13, Concession 8 Jaffray, on the East M click 
Eoad; and across lot 2, Concession 1 Melick, on the Charlesbois Eoad, .85 mile was 
cut, .47 stumped and grubbed, 1.25 graded or re-graded, 3,500 ft. ditched, 3 stone 
culverts constructed and 1 repaired, 50 cu. yds. rock cut, and 550 yds. of gravel 
used in surfacing. The work covered a distance of 3 miles. 

Winnipeg River Road : 

On lot 2, concession 6, Jaffray, a i/4 of a mile was cut out, ditched and graded, 
60 yds. of gravel being used in surfacing. 

Kenora-Keewatin Road: 

The only work on this road consisted of blasting operations at a dangerous 
turn in the road where 12 cu. yds. of rock were removed. 

East Melick Road to Redditt : 

Starting at the Junction with Charlesbois Eoad, on lot 12, Concession 8, 
Jaffray and continuing northwards on lot 12, Jaffray; lot 1, Concession 1, Melick; 
and between lots 4 and 5, across Concession 2 and south half Concession 3, 2 miles 
were cut out, 1.4 miles stumped and grubbed, 2.7 miles graded, 264 ft. ditched, 
3 timber culverts constructed, 40 cu. yds. of rock blasted, and 532 cu. yds. of gravel 
used in surfacing. 

West Melich Road : 

From the boundary between Jaffray and Melick northwards between mining 
claims S 479 and D 747, etc., to the line between lots 12 and 13, Concession 3, 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 157 

Melick, on the north boundary of claim S 490, a distance of 2i^ miles, 2 miles were 
cut out 66 ft. wide and a y^ mile 40 ft. wide, I14 mile was stumped and grubbed, 
11/2 mile graded, 14,500 ft. ditched, 9 timber culverts constructed, and 925 cu. yds. 
of gravel used in surfacing. 

Oxdrift to Vermilion Bay : 

Eunning along the C. P. Railway right-of-way, through the Townships of 
Eton, Sandford, Mutrie and Langton, 8.5 miles cut out 66 ft. wide, 9.75 miles 
stumped and grubbed, 13 miles graded or re-graded, 17,454 ft. ditched, 15 timber 
and 2 galvanized iron culverts constructed, 4,395 cu. yds. of gravel was used in 
surfacing and repairing, and the entire 30 miles kept dragged up and in good 
condition. 

Dryden to Wabigoon: 

Running along the C. P. Railway right-of-way, through the Townships of 
Wainwright and Zealand, a distance of 17 miles. This road was kept in repair. 

Toivnship of Au hrey : 

" Lyles Road," between lots 8 and 9, across Concessions 5 and 6 thence 
southerly across I.R.27 and between lots 6 and 7, on south half of Concession 4, 
together with a branch road running north-easterly across lots 4, 5 and 6 from the 
south east corner of lot 7, Concession 4. One mile cut out, ll^ miles brushed 
30 ft. wide, 4i/^ miles stumped, grubbed and graded, 400 ft. ditched, and 3 timber 
culverts constructed. 

"Aubrey-Ox drift" Road, between lots 3 and 4, Concession 6, l^ mile cut, 
stumped and grubbed, l^ mile graded and ditched, 2 timber culverts constructed, 
420 ft. of cross-laying, and 150 yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repair. 

Toivnline hetiveen Aubrey and Eton: 

" Snider's Road," across lots 1, 2 and 3, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, l^/^ 
miles graded and ditched, 5 timber culverts constructed, 365 ft. of road cross-laid, 
and 300 ft. of creek cleaned out to secure drainage. 

Township of Drayton : 

" Road to Alcona Station," between lots 1 and 2, across Concession 1, between 
Concessions 1 and 2, across lot 2, between lots 2 and 3, across Concessions 2 and 3. 
and across lot 2, Concession 2 from foregoing to station, 3 miles cut and burned 
€6 ft. wide, 3 miles stumped and grubbed 35 ft. wide, 1% miles graded, 3,540 ft. 
ditched, 2 stone culverts constructed, I/2 mile of road cross-laid, and 900 cu. yds. 
of gravel used in surfacing. 

Township of Eton : 

Between lots 6 and 7, across north half Concession 4 and south half Concession 
5, between lots 7 and 8, across Concession 4 and south half Concession 5, between 
lots 8 and 9, across south half Concession 6, between Concessions 3 and 4, across 
lots 7 and 8, and between Concessions 4 and 5, across parts of lots 6, 7 and 8, 



158 EEPOKT OF THE ^^^PI^L 

.38" mile cut out 66 ft. wide, .65 cut out 35 ft. wide, 1.65 miles stumped and 
grubbed, 8,216 ft. ditched, 3 timber culverts constructed, and 110 yds. of cross- 
laying repaired. 

Between lots 2 and 3, across Concessions 4 and 5 and between Concessions 
4 and 5, across lot 2, 2.4 miles cut out and burned, 2^ miles stumped and grubbed, 
1.85 miles graded, % mile ploughed only, 540' ft. ditched, and 9 timber culverts 
constructed. 

Between lots 10 and 11, across Concessions 2 and 3, 1 mile cut out and graded, 
2,475 ft. of ditching, 1 mile of repairs, and 4 timber culverts put in. 

Between Township of Eton and Township of Wainwright, across Concessions 
2 and 3, I/2 mile cut out, 1^ miles stumped and grubbed, 2 miles graded, 1,085 ft. 
of ditching, and 5 timber and 1 iron culvert constructed. 



Toivnships of Vanhorne and Zealand : 

" Sandy Beach Eoad,"' between Concessions 4 and 5, across lots 1 and 2 Van- 
horne, and 23 Zealand, l^/o miles brushed out, 310 ft. ditched, 1 culvert repaired, 
and 1% miles dragged. 



Township of Wainwright : 

Between lots 4 and 5, across Concessions 1 to 4, betweeji lots 3 and 4, across 
north half Concession 1, between lots 2 and 3 across north half Concession 1 and 
south half Concession 2, between Concessions 1 and 2 across lots 1 to 4 and across 
lot 23 Zealand Township, and between lots 22 and 23 across north half Concession 
7 Zealand, 3i/4 miles cut out, I/2 mile stumped and grubbed, 514 miles graded, 
5,678 ft. of ditching, 9 timber and 3 iron culverts constructed, 1 bridge built, 
885 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing, and the whole road dragged and washouts 
repaired. 

Township of Wahigoon: 

Between lots 8 and 9 across north half Concession 3 and south half Con- 
cession 4, between lots 2 and 3 across Concession 5 and north half Concession 4, 
between Concessions 5 and 6 across lots 3-12, and on the Trunk Eoad from Ver- 
milion Bay on lot 5, Concession 4, Langton, to Quibel on lot 8, Concession 5, Wahi- 
goon, 5 miles cut out and burned, 21/^ miles stumped and grubbed, 3i/^ miles 
graded, 3,925 feet of ditching, 22 timber culverts and 1 timber bridge constructed. 
68 yards of gravel used in repairing, and dragging carried on over a distance of 
12J/4 miles of road. 

Tovjnship of Zealand: 

Between Concessions 8 and 9 across lot 19, and between lots 19 and 20 across 
Concessions 7, 8 and part of 9, II/2 miles cut out, stumped and grubbed, % mile 
graded, 4,650 feet of ditching, 3 timber culverts and one bridge constructed, 942 
yards of gravel used in surfacing and repair anJ one mile dragged. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 159 

MATHESON DISTEICT. 

Township of Beatty. 

Between lots 9 and 10 across Concessions 1 and 2, 3 miles graded^ 400 feet 
of offtake ditching, 11 timber culverts and 1 timber bridge, 20 x 16 x 6 constructed. 

Tomnline Townships of Beatty and Hislop: 

Across lots 1-3, 1 timber culvert constructed and holes in V/o miles of road, 
caused b}- bush fires, repaired. 

Toivnline Toivnships of Beatty and Carr: 

Across Concessions 3 and 4, 1^4 miles gravelled. 

Township of Benoit : 

Between Concessions 1 and 2 across lots 4-8, 15 timber culverts constructed. 

Toivnline Townships of Benoit and CooTc: 
Across lots 6-8, % mile cut out. 

Toivnship of Bond : 

Between lots 2 and 3 across Concession 3, % mile cut and burned. 
Between lots 2 and 3 across Concession 5, 7-10 miles burned, stumped, grubbed 
and graded, 1,700 feet of offtake ditching, and 9 timber culverts constructed. 

Toivnship of Boivman : 

Trunk Road south-east from Matheson, Concessions 5 and 6, lot 4, i^ mile 
gravelled, 66 feet offtake ditching, 2 timber culverts constructed, 1 mile of road 
regraded. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 8-10, i/4 mile burned. Between 
lots 10 and 11, Concession 6, one mile graded, 300 feet offtake ditching, 6 timber 
^cul verts and 1 timber bridge, 80 x 16 x 8, constructed. 

Between lots 6 and 7, Concession 4, % mile graded and 1 timber bridge 20 x 
;16x 8 constructed. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 3, 1 mile cut and burned. 

\Town Lilies between Boivman and Carr, Bowman and Curne and ^Currie and 
Taylor : 

11/2 miles gravelled, 3 bridges repaired, 4 miles regraded, 2 timber culverts 
[constructed, 1,500 feet side ditching, 1 mile repaired. 

Across Concessions 4 and 5, Bowman and Currie, 1,540 feet offtake ditching, 
5 timber culverts constructed, 3,868 feet muskeg covered with clay and one mile 
dragged. 

^^Township of Carr : 

Trunk Road through Concession 2, ^o mile gravelled.' 

Between lots 4 and 5, Concessions 1 and 2, 1 bridge repaired, 1 bridge con- 
structed. 



160 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lot 5, 3 concrete culverts, 2 timber bridges, and 
14 mile of road regraded. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5, lots 5-8, 2 miles graded, 8 timber culverts. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4, lots 5 and 6, 1 mile burned, stumped and 
grubbed. 

Townline Tovmships of Currie and Bond : 

Across Concession 3, 1,650 feet of road cut and burned, 66 feet wide. 

Township of Hislop : 

Between lots 3 and 4, Concessions 4 and 5, 1% miles cut and burned, 1 mile 
stumped and grubbed and 1 timber bridge, 106 ft. x 16 ft. x 10 ft. constructed. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6, lots 2 and 3, 1 mile cut, burned, stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4, lots 4 and 5, 1 mile cut, burned, stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lots 10 and 11, 1 mile cut, burned, stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6, lot 10, covering of bridge repaired. 

Townline Townships of Hislop and Playfair. 

Across lots 9 and 10, 1 mile stumped, grubbed and graded, 875 feet offtake 
ditching and 4 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Maisonville : 

Between Concessions 1 and 2, lot 7, 1 timber culvert and 2 timber bridges 
constructed. 

Township of Play fair: 

Between Concessions 5 and 6, lot 4, bridge over Black River repaired, and 1 
timber culvert repaired. 

Between lots 3 and 4, Concession 3, 1 mile of road burned 66 it. wide. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 5, 1 mile graded, 300 feet of offtake ditching^ 
5 timber culverts and 1 timber bridge constructed. 

Between Concessions 5 and 6, across lots 9-11, 11/^ miles graded, 700 feet 
offtake ditching, 3 timber bridges and 6 timber culverts constructed. 

Between lots 8 and 9 through Concession 6, 1,980 feet of muskeg road covered 
with clay. 

Trunk Road through Concession 5 across lots 5 and part of 4, 3,498 feet 
graded, 800 feet of offtake ditching and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 6, 1 mile graded, 500 feet offtake ditching 
and 8 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Stock: 

Between Concessions 1 and 2 across lots 3-6, 2 miles stumped, grubbed and 
graded, 1,000 feet offtake ditching, 8 timber culverts and 2 timber bridges con- 
structed. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OP LANDS AND FORESTS. 161 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concession 2, i/^ mile stumped, grubbed and graded, 
500 feet offtake ditching and 4 timber culverts constructed. 

Between Lots 4 and 5, Concession 5, 2 miles side ditching and 1,518 feet 
offtake ditching. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5, across lots 1-4, 1 mile burned, stumped and 
grubbed, ll^ miles graded, 900 feet offtake ditching and 8 timber culverts 
constructed. 

Townline Townships of Stock and Taylor : 

Across Concessions 1 and 2 and part of 3, 2^2. miles gravelled. 

Township of Taylor: 

B~etween lots 8 and 9 and between Concessions 5 and 6, 2 miles gratelled, 
8 timber culverts constructed and 2 miles repaired. 

Between lots 2 and 3, Concessions 1 and 2, 1/2 mile burned, stumped and 
grubbed, 2 miles graded, 300 feet gravelled, 800 feet offtake ditching and 12 timber 
culverts constructed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5, lot 11, 1 timber bridge 122 ft. x 16 ft. x 11 ft. 
constructed. 

Between lots 10 and 11, Concessions 1 and 2, 347 feet cut out, 1 mile stumped, 
grubbed and graded, 2,838 feet side ditching, 3 timber culverts constructed and 2 
repaired. 

Between Concessions 2 and 3 across lot 6, 1,000 feet of muskeg road covered 
with clay. 

Between lots 4 and 5, Concession 5, 1 mile burned, stumped and grubbed. 

Between Concessions 3 and 4, lot 3, % mile graded, and 2 timber culverts 
constructed. 

Between Concessions 1 and 2, lots 11 and 12, 1 mile cut and burned. 

Townline Townships Taylor and Walker'. 

Across lots 2-6, 21/2 miles stumped and grubbed, graded and culverts and 
bridges constructed. 

Trunk Road, Concessions 1 and 6, 4,620 feet graded, 200 feet offtake ditching, 
and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Walker: 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, lot 9, 1 timber culvert constructed. 

Between. Concessions 2 and 3, lot 8, i/^ mile stumped, grubbed and graded and 
2 timber culverts constructed. 

Between Concessions 4 and 5 across lots 9-11, 1^/2 miles graded, 925 feet of 
offtake ditching, and 7 timber culverts constructed. 

Between lots 10 and 11, Concession 1, ^2 mile burned, stumped and grubbed. 

Between lots 4 and 5, Concessions 1 and 2, 2 miles cut, burned, stumped and 
grubbed. 

Between lots 10 and 11, Concession 3, I/2 mile burned, stumped, grubbed and 
graded, 600 feet offtake ditching and 2 timber culverts constructed. 

Between lots 8 and 9, Concession 3, y^ mile burned, stumped and graded and 
2 timber culverts constructed. 

11 L.F. 



3 63 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



MUSKOKA DISTRICT. 

Road from Utterson to PatTij Sound : 

In the Township of Stephenson and on the Watt-Stephenson townline, 5i/^ 
miles graded, 16,500 feet ditching, 1 timbei', 1 stone and 5 iron culverts installed 
and 208 cubic yards gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Road from FalJcenhurg to Beatrice and North to TJfford Road: 

In the Townships of Macaulay and Monck and on the Watt-Stephenson town- 
line, 5 miles graded, 1,697 cubic yards gravel used in surfacing and repairs, one 
mile of ditching, 3 stone and 3 metal culverts installed, and 151/2 miles dragged. 




Road construction — TVIuskoka District. 



DISTRICT OF NIPISSING. 

Trunk Road Callander to Mattawa: 

In the Township of Ferris, between Concessions 8 and 9 across lots 10 to 22 
and between lots 9 and 10 across Concessions 7 and 8, 2 miles cut out, 10 miles of 
dragging, 1 mile ditching, 4 timber and 11 stone culverts installed, and 2,330 
cubic yards of gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Road from Feronia to Widdifield: 

In the Township of Widdifield, 3.2 miles of road cut and burned 66 feet wide, 
stumped and grubbed 26 feet wide, ready for grading; this connects up the Widdi- 
field settlement Avith the Town of North Bay. 

To7vnsliip of Ckisholm : • 

Between lots 10 and 11 across Concessions 10 and 11; between Concessions 10 
and 11 across lots 6-15; between lots 5 and 6 across Concessions 11 and 12; between 



1920 21 



DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND E0KEST8. 



163 



Concessions 12 and 13 across lots 1 to 5 on the Chisholm Eoad, 2^/2 miles cut out, 
Yo mile stumped and grubbed, 4 miles graded, 826 cubic yards of gravel used in 
surfacing and repairs, 4,240 feet of ditching, 9 timber culverts constructed and 9 
miles dragged. 

Toumsliip of Widdifield: 

On the Trunk Road between North Bay and Trout Mills, li/^ miles brushed 
out, 660 cubic yards gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 450 feet of ditching, 
2 miles dragged, 1 timber culvert constructed, 

Toivnsliips of Uimsworth and Chisholm : 

On the line between Concessions 12 and 13 across lots 1-15, Himsworth, and 
1-5, Chisholm, 5^ miles graded and dragged, 166 cubic yards gravel used in sur- 
facing and repairs, 1 timber and 8 stone culverts constructed. 





m.i^ .^, -.j^JifcilBBI^^B 


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Xewly-iuude road i'urry Suuiid bisUicl. 



PARRY SOUND DISTRICT. 

Pioad from Barnesdale to Footes Bay: 

In the Township of Conger, from Barnesdale, southwards, % mile of road was 
cut out, stumped and grubbed. 

Road from Powassan to Nipissing and Restouh : 

From lot 14, Concession 16, Gurd, to lot 27, Concession 6, Nipissing, between 
Nipissing Village and Restoule, 1 mile graded, 630 cubic yards gravel used in sur- 
facing and repairs, 17 timber culverts installed and one bridge (timber and stone) 
constructed. 

In the Township of Himsworth, 130 cubic yards of gravel u^ed in surfacing 
and repairs between lots 20 and 21 across Concession 15, Between Powassan and 



164 



REPOET OF THE 



No. 3 



Nipissing, 10' miles were dragged and i/4 i^^ile repaired; 117 yards of gravel used 
and 1 bridge repaired from north-east corner of lot 11, Concession 10, to south-west 
corner lot 13, Concession 10, Nipissing, and lot 25, Concession 18, Himsworth. 

In the Township of Nipissing 883 cubic yards of gravel used and 1^/4 miles 
road dragged across lots 27 and 28, Himsworth, and lots 1-8, Nipissing, between 
Concessions 18 and 19. 

Across lots 15 and 16, Concession 9, north boundary lot 13, Concession 10 to 
south-east corner lot 20, Concession 8, across lots 16-20, Concession 7; lot 14, 
Concession 10 to lot 21, Concession 7, 1% miles cut out, 2 miles stumped and 
grubbed, 3% miles graded, 1,882 yds. gravel used in surfacing, etc., 5,880 feet 
side ditching, 16 stone, 9 timber and 7 timber and stone culverts constructed and 3 
miles of road repaired. 




Steel Bridge — Timmins, Mattagami River. 



Commanda Road : 



In the Township of (rurd, 2i/^ miles cut out, 2 miles stumped and grubbed, 
31/^ miles graded, 1,318 cubic yards gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 7,920 
feet of ditching, 33 timber, 6 stone and 6 iron culverts constructed, 1/2 ™ile cross- 
laying 12 feet wide, 8 miles of road dragged, and 320 rods wire fencing. 



POECUPINE DISTRICT. 



Toivnship of Mount joy: 

Trunk road north of Mattagami River from bridge on lot 2, Concession 2 to 
line between lots 9 and 10, 314 miles graded, 500 feet of cross laying 10 feet wide, 
3.2 miles ditching, 14 mile dragged, 4 timber culverts constructed and 1,110 yards 
of gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Trunk Road south of Mattagami River from Mountjoy Bridge on lot 2, Con- 
•jCGSsion 3 to half-way across lot 5, Concession 1, 2% miles graded and 300 cubic 
yauls gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OP LANDS AND FOEESTS. 165 

Trunk Road east of Mattagami Eiver across Concession 5, 300' feet stumped 
and grubbed, 670 feet cross laying 16 ft. wide, 360 cubic yards filling and 400 cubic 
yards gravel used in surfacing and repairs. Between lots 4 and 5, across Con- 
cession 3 and north half Concession 2, y^ mile burned, 1 mile grubbed, 250 ft. 
cross laying, 11,040 ft. ditching and 5 timber culverts constructed. 

Townlmp, Townships of Shaw and Delora: 

Timber bridge constructed over Shaw Creek, 40 ft. x 16 ft. 

Tonnit^iip of Tisdale: 

On Lot 12, Concession 2, 75 acres cut and burned in Timmins fire guard. 

On the Trunk Eoad from South Porcupine to Schumacher, considerable 
grading and gravelling was done under the supervision of the Township Council. 
A contract for approximately 2,000 yards of gravel was let, and at least an equal 
quantity was placed on the road by day labour. Operations were carried on over 
approximately 4 miles of road, 1,400 feet of which was covered with rock, 18 feet 
wide, one clay cut 200 feet in length and one timber culvert constructed 25 f t x 5 
ft. 6 in. x 4 ft. After sheeting with gravel, the road was graded, raked and rolled. 

Bridge over Mattagami River at Timmins: 

For a number of years a scow crossing on lot 2, Concession 2, Mountjoy 
Towuship, carried all the traffic into the agricultural portion of the township from 
the Town of Timmins. This has been replaced by a steel bridge, in two spans, 
125 feet each, which was erected on substructure partially completed in 1919. 

RAINY RIVER DISTRICT. 

Trunk Road, Fort Frances to Rainy River: 

Starting in the Township of Mclrvine at Fort Frances and running practi- 
cally alongside the Canadian National Railway to Rainy River, in the Township of 
Attwood, a distance of approximately 60 miles, this road has been kept in very good 
condition. Dragging operations were carried on when weather conditions were 
favourable, gravel sheeting was placed where surface showed signs of wear, and soft 
spots were drained and afterwards gravelled. Four miles cut out or brushed, 
27^2 miles regraded, 11,140 cubic yards gravel used in surfacing, 9,007 feet of 
ditching, 12 wood culverts constructed, two culverts and 8 bridges repaired, 60 
cubic yards of stone and 60 cubic yards of clay used in filling. 

Main Roads: 

" Sleeman-Bergland Road," 5 miles, " Spohn Road,'' north from Rainy River, 
4 miles and " Carpenter-Dobie Road," 4 miles were kept dragged and in fair con- 
dition. 

Carpenter-Dohie Townline : 

This four miles of road in addition to dragging had 110 rods covered with 
222 yards of gravel and one timber culvert constructed. 



166 REPOET OF THE Xo. 3 



T.ownsliip of Carpenter: 

Between lots 5 and 6 across Concession 5, 3,795 feet ditching. 

Townships of McCrosson, Tovell and Morson : 

In McCrosson Township between lots 2 and 3, north half Concession 3, and 
between Concessions 3 and 4, across lots 1 and 2, on line between McCrosson and 
Tovell across Concessions 4 and 6, and on line between lots 12 and 13 across Con- 
cessions 1 and 2, Morson, 2>4 miles cut out, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, % mile 
graded, 1,G40 feet ditching and 2 timber culverts constructed. 

Township of Nelles: • 

Between Sections 7 and 8, south half, 14 mile grading, 4,290 feet ditching and 
1 timber culvert. 

Between Sections 22 and 23, 1.2 miles cut out, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, 
and graded, and 6,625 feet of ditching. 

Toiunshii) of Potts: 

Between lots 2 and 3 across Concessions 1, 2 and 3, one mile graded and 660 
feet ditched. 

Township of Tovell: 

Between Concessions 2 and 3 across parts of lots 7 and 8 and across lot 11, 
14 mile cut out 66 feet wide, 1-10 mile graded, and 300 feet ditched. 

SAULT STE. MARIE DISTRICT. 

Trunk Road, Sudbury to Sault Ste. Marie: 

This road, two hundred miles in length was divided for maintenance purposes 
into three divisions, the western under J. Leacock, the central under J. E. Wright 
and the eastern under H. C. Halford, as foremen. A regular patrol was estab- 
lished in order that washouts and bad places might be promptly repaired. At the 
same time one-third of the entire distance was re-gravelled and other betterments 
made. 

Tlie section between Algoma and Cutler, 19 miles in length, on which work 
commenced in 1919, was completed with the exception of the surface gravelling of 
four miles. One 20-foot reinforced concrete bridge was built on this section. 
Particular care was taken on this section with grades, alignment and drainage and 
all swampy stretches were drained and stone filled. 

Owing to shortage of labour and the necessity of finishing the above section by 
the middle of July, it was not possible to run the rock crushing plant to capacity. 
A sufficient quantity was crushed, however, to surface some of the softer portions 
of the roadbed. The plant was moved to the vicinity of Webbwood, where it is 
installed ready for operation in the ensuing season. 

A fill of five thousand yards was made at the Town of Blind River to replace 
a condemned wooden structure leading to the bridge over the Blind River. This 
fill was riprapped, gravelled and railed. The following figures give a summary of 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



167 



the work carried on during the season: 28.1 miles were cut out, 9.5 miles brushed, 
11 miles burned, 2.17 miles stumped and grubbed, 28.41 miles graded, 14 timber 
and 73 iron culverts were constructed, 2 rebuilt and 2 repaired', 4 bridges repaired, 
138 miles dragged, 109 miles repaired, 580 3'ards of crushed stone and 159,084 
yards of gravel used in surfacing, 1,084 yards of stone fill, 98,615 feet of ditching 
and 6 miles of ditches cleaned. 

Ooulais Bay Road : 

Ftom Sault Ste. Marie to Goulais Bay, in the Township of Pennefather, 
general repairs and dragging, 2 timber and 5 iron culverts constructed, 180 feet 
of ditching, and 293 yards of gravel used in surfacing. The diversion at 'Calamity 
Hill affording a grade of 9 per cent, in place of one of 20 per cent, was completed, 
three thousand yards of earth and hardpan being moved. 




Macadam road under construction. 



iShaw Road, Township of Bridgeland : 

One 90-foot bridge, one 35 feet and one 30 feet repaired. 

Wells Road, Township of Wells: 

Six miles brushed, 4 timber culverts constructed, 7,940 ft. of ditching, and 
780 cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Township of Louise : 

Between lots 7 and 8, Concession 5, and across lot 8, Concession 4, % mile 
stumped and grubbed, 14 i»ile graded, 250 ft. ditched, and ^4 i^iile repaired. 



168 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Between lots 7 and 8, Concession 5, and across northerly end of lots 8 and 9, 
Concession 4, 1 mile cut out, stumped, grubbed and ditched, 4 timber culverts 
constructed, I/2 mile repaired using 50 cu. yds. of gravel. 

Campement d'ours Road: 

Prom north-east side of Camp d'ours for 70 rods south, 14 mile of road 
dragged, 1,860 ft. of ditching, 2 timber and 1 iron culvert constructed, and 255 
cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing. The cut on the hill at the northerly end of 
this road was completed, leaving a final grade of 11 per cent. 

Across Island from St. Joseph to Kensington Point, 8 timber culverts con- 
structed, 1% miles dragged, 4,620 ft. of ditching, and 631 cu. yds. gravel used in 
surfacing and repairs. 

St. Joseph Island : 

In the Townships of Jocelyn, St. Joseph and Hilton, 2i/^ miles cut out, i/^ 
mile graded, 3 iron, 6 wooden and 1 stone culverts constructed, 169 miles of 
dragging (several portions of the roads being dragged more than once) 13,233 ft. 
of ditching, and 507 cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

* 

Manitoulin Island: 

Totvnship of Allan: 

Between Concessions 8 and 9, across lots 1 to 28 on the Gore Bay-Little Cur- 
rent Eoad, iy2 miles dragging, 1 mile grading, 1,017 cu. yds. of gravel used in 
surfacing and repairs, and 1 timber and stone culvert constructed. 

Townships of AssiginacJc and Sheguindah : 

Five miles of the road running northwards from Manitowaning were repaired, 
480 cu. yds. of gravel used. 

Township of Bidwell : 

Between Concessions 10 and 11, across lots 16 to 26, on the Gore Bay-Little 
Current Road, i/4 mile cut out, stumped and grubbed QQ ft. wide, 2 miles graded, 
1 stone and 5 wooden culverts constructed, II/2 miles dragged, 1,300 cu. yds. earth 
fill over flat rock as a foundation for gravel, 1,280 ft. of ditching, and 435 yds. 
of gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Township of Billings : 

Between Concessions 14 and 15, across lots 21 to 30, Billings, and across lots 
1 to 4, Allan, on the Gore Bay-Little Current Road, 2.5 miles graded, 1 timber 
culvert constructed, and 210 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Between lots 21 and 22, across Concessions 9, 13 and 14 on same road, 3% 
miles dragged, 4 timber culverts constructed, and 265 cu. yds. gravel used in sur- 
facing and repairs. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 169 

Township of Burpee : 

Between Concessions 7 and 8, across lots 17 to 23 on the road from Gore Bay 
to Silverwater, ^4 ™^ile cut out, stumped and grubbed, 2 miles graded, and 239 
yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Township of Camphell: 

Between Concessions 2 and 3, across lots 26 to 29 and between lots 25 and 26, 
across Concessions 3 and 4 on the road from Gore Bay to Providence Bay, II/2 
miles cut out, 1^ miles graded, 333 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 
and % mile dragged. 

Between Concessions 10 and 11, across lots 1 to 10 and on townline between 
Campbell and Carnarvon, across Concessions 11 and 14 on same road, 1^4: miles 
cut out, % mile stumped and grubbed, 2^4 miles graded, 857 cu. yds, gravel used 
in surfacing and repairs, 1 stone and wood and 2 stone culverts constructed. 

Township of Carnarvon : 

Between Concessions 6 and 7, across lots 1 to 5 on road from Providence Bay 
to Mindemoya, 1^/4 miles graded and 600 yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs. 

Between Concessions 6 and 7, across lots 7 to 13 on Providence-West Bay 
Eoad, and along eastern shore of Mindemoya Lake on Concessions 1, 2 and 3 and 
lots 16 to 23, 14 mile graded and 124 cu. yds. gravel used in repairs. 

Township of Dawson : 

Along western shore of Mildrum Bay on road from Silverwater on lots 23 
and 24, ^ mile graded and 150' yds. of gravel used in repairs. 

Township of Gordon : 

Through lots 22 and 23, Concessions 2 to 5, on road to Indian Point Bridge, 
214 miles cut out, li/^ miles stumped, I14 miles graded, 823 cu. yds. gravel used 
in surfacing and repairs, 5 timber and 7 stone culverts constructed. 

Six miles of the road from Gore Bay to Providence Bay, along townline 
between Gordon and Allan, northerly side of Concession A to west boundary of 
lot 5, Gordon, and thence north to line between Concessions 9 and 10^ Gordon, 
were repaired. 

Township of Robinson : 

Between lots 3 and 4 across Concession 5, between Concessions 5 and 6 across 
lots 4 and 5, between lots 5 and 6 across Concession 6, and across Concession 7 on 
lot 6, road from Silverwater to Gore Bay, 11/^ miles cut out, li/4 miles stumped 
and grubbed, l^/^ miles graded, 1,291 cu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 
2 timber, 3 stone and 1 timber and stone culverts constructed, and 1 mile dragged. 

12 L.F. 



170 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

SUDBURY DISTRICT. 

Shining Tree Road: 

In the Township of Askwith, 3I/4 miles cut out, 2/5 mile stumped and grubbed, 
1/^ mile graded, 7,509 eu. yds. gravel used in surfacing and repairs, 1 mile ditching, 
18 culverts constructed, and 6,030 ft. of cross-laying. In all, about 6 miles of road 
was sheeted and repaired. 

Sudbury to Chelmsford: 

In the Township of Rayside, between Murray Mine and Azilda, 68 cu. yds. 
of gravel and 60 cu. yds. of crushed rock were used in repairs over a distance of 
3 miles. 

From Chelmsford to 4 miles east of Azilda, in the Townships of Balfour and 
Rayside, 12 miles were re-graded and 2 iron and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Sudbury to Capreol: 

In the Townships of McKim and Blezard, from Sudbury, north for 5 miles, 
1,161 cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing and repairs and 1 iron culvert constructed. 

Cogger Cliff to Creighton: 

In the Township of AVaters, from 4 miles west of Copper Cliff to 4 miles east 
of Creighton, this road was repaired with 360 cu. yds. of gravel. 

Warren-St. diaries Road: 

On the section from 3 miles south of Warren to 6 miles south of Warren 547 
cu. yds. of gravel used in repairs. 

From St. Charles south, a distance of 6 miles, 1,878 cu. yds. of gravel used 
in repairs. 

Sturgeon Falls to Field: 

In the Townships of Field and Springer, 4% miles graded, 2.186 on. yds. of 
gravel used in surfacing and repairs, and 3 timber culverts constructed. 

Sturgeon Falls to Smoky Falls : 

In the Township of Springer, 21/^ miles cut out. 31/2 miles graded, 2,308 cu. 
yds. grayel used in surfacing and repairs, 1,820 ft. of ditching, and 5 timber cul- 
verts constructed. 

THUXDER BAY DISTRICT. 

International or Scott Hightvay: 

This highway ha? carried a heavy traffic from the Minnesotar boundary at 
Pigeon River, to Fort William. ■ Inspection of" the road towards the end of the 
season gave evidence that the general maintenance work carried on had preserved 
the road surface generally and, notwithstanding the heavy traffic, it was in very 
fair condition for travel. 



1920 21 



DEPAKTMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



171 



One bridge was raised 3 ft., 6,764 cu. yds. of gravel or shale were used in 
patching and re-surfacing, 39 timber and 6 iron culverts were constructed, and 
35 miles of the road was dragged when weather conditions suited for this form 
of maintenance. 

At one rather dangerous curse a large clay cut was made and the road widened 
sufficiently to minimize the danger, and to carry this out successfully necessitated 
the construction of high rip rap to prevent the fill sliding down the banks of the 
Pigeon Kiver. At other curves the road was kept brushed out to provide as clear 
a view ahead as possible. 

In the latter part of the season an attempt was made to establish a mainten- 
ance patrol with considerable success; the road was repaired with gravel, dragged, 
and ditched along the Horn Kill; 2 timber culverts were reconstructed and 300' ft. 
of ditches opened. 




International Bridge — (Pigeon River, Port Arthur-Dulutli Road. 



Loon Lake or Black Bay Road : 

Running easterly from Port Arthur, it is intended that work on this road will 
be continued until it reaches Xipigon and effectually opens up the fine agricultural 
Townships of Dorion, Stirling and Xipigon. 

The season's efforts were confined mainly to the Township of McGregor, and 
consisted of repairs and improvements to the existing road, and new construction 
along the Hydro-Electric pole line to the McKenzie River, where concrete abut- 
ments were constructed to carry a 60-ft. steel girder bridge. A small amount of 
new work was done east of the McKenzie but only in connection with hill cutting 
in making the eastern approach to the bridge. 

Four miles of road were brushed out, 4.75 miles were cut, 5 miles stumped, 
3 miles grubbed, 3 miles graded, and 5^/4 re-graded, 4,850 cu. yds. of gravel was 



172 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

used in re-surfacing, etc., 21,000 ft. linl. of ditching, 26 culverts constructed, 5 
miles dragged, and 4 miles widened. These operations were carried on over about 
20 miles of road. 

Arthur St. Road : 

This, the main road running west from Fort William through Neebing and 
Paipoonge Townships, was maintained in good condition. The road was dragged 
several times, 2^/2 miles cut out, 5 miles re-graded, 1 culvert constructed, 400 ft. 
ditching, and 2,897 cu. yds. of gravel used in re-surfacing and repairing bad spots. 

Olliver Road : 

In a parallel direction to the Arthur St. Road, this is the main road west 
from Port Arthur, through Mclntyre, Olliver and other Townships. Twelve miles 
of dragging was done on the road and 272 cu. yds. of gravel used in surfacing a 
bad clay spot in Olliver Township. 

KalceheTca-IIymers Road : 

On the line between Concessions 6 and 7 and between lots 6 and 7, in the 
Township of O'Connor, 1,459 cu. yds. of gravel was used in re-surfacing and repair 
of this road. 

Silver Mountain Road'. 

Through the Townships of Gillies, O'Connor and Paipoonge, this road runs 
in a south-westerly direction from the Arthur Street Road, and the season's work 
included: 3 miles of cutting, 3^ miles of .stumping and grubbing, 4i/4 miles of 
grading, 300 ft. of ditching, 13 wooden culverts and 1 stone culvert were con- 
structed, 1,000 cu. yds. of gravel was used in re-surfacing and repair, and 2 miles 
were dragged. 

In addition to the foregoing, an amount of $480 was spent on this road 
through the Township of Lybster — this is included in the report under that 
township. 

Dawson Road : ' - 

Running north-westerly from Port Arthur through the Townships of Mclntyre 
and Ware to Kaministiquia, this road carries a heavy traffic and will require' 
a considerable expenditure to put it in good condition. Gravelling over the clay 
stretches, drainage and hill cutting are necessary, and it is the intention to proceed 
with this as soon as possible. This season's work consisted of l^^ miles of cutting 
out,, brushing, stumping and grubbing, 462 ft. of ditching, the contruction of 5 
wooden culverts, the repair of 3 others, and the repair of the worst spots in the 
road with gravel. 

Township of Conmee: 

Road cut, graded, ditched and 6 culverts constructed across lot 10 on south 
boundary. Seven and three-quarter miles were re-graded, 6 culverts built, 395 
cu. yds. gravel and 93 yds. crushed stone were used in surfacing and repairing on 
the road across Concession 1, and thence between lots 6 and 7, lots 4 and 5, and 
east side of lot 1. 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND EOEESTS. 173 



Township of Dorian : 

On line between lots 12 and 13 from oth Concession line to 3rd Concession 
line, % mile was brushed QQ ft. wide, 561 cu. yds. gravel was used in surfacing, 
etc., and 4 timber culverts were constructed. 

From lot 10, Concession 3, to lot 7, Concession 6, 1,650 ft. of ditching, 413 
yds. of gravel used on surface, 9 timber culverts constructed, and 1 bridge on lot 7, 
Concession 6, repaired. Operations for the season were carried on over a distance 
of 15 miles. 

Township of Gorhani : 

One bridge repaired and 31/2 miles dragged on east boundary, north from 
Mclntyre townline. 

Four culverts constructed, 600 ft. ditched, 1/4 mile graded, and 500 cu. yds. 
gravel used in surfacing of road between Concession 5 and Concession 6, across 
lot 18, and road between lots 16 and 17, across parts of Concession 3 and Conces- 
sion 4. 

One and a quarter miles cut out, 1 mile stumped and grubbed, % mile graded, 
1,3*70 ft. ditched, 2 stone and 2 wooden culverts constructed, and 12 miles of cross- 
laying on road between Concessions 3 and 4, across lots 6, 7, 8, and part of 9. 

Toivnship of Gillies : 

One and a quarter miles of cutting, % mile burning, 1% miles stumping and 
grubbing, 3 miles grading, 2,940 ft. ditching, 8 concrete and 9 timber culverts, 
1 bridge repaired, and 1 mile dragged on the side roads between lots 8 and 9, 
Concessions 1, 4 and 5, between lots 6 and 7, Concessions 2 to 5 inclusive, between 
lots 4 and 5, Concession 1, between Concessions 1 and 2, across lots 9 and 10, 
between Concessions 5 and 6, across lots 8 and 9, and on lot 7, Concession 6. 

Toivnship of Lyhster : 

On the main road to Silver Mountain, 7 miles, road between lots 4 and 5 and 
between lots 8 and 9, road running north-west across lots 9 to 1 2, and road through 
lots 9 to 12 in Concession 3 to 5, there were 314 miles cut out, 15,840 ft. of ditches 
cleared, 46 timber culverts re-built, and 8 miles dragged. 

Toivnship of Marks : 

One-half mile cut out, 2 miles stumped and grubbed, four miles graded, 1,400 
ft. ditched, 14 timber culverts and 2 bridges constructed, 1/2 mile cro&s-layed, and 
1 mile dragged on the following: line between Concessions 6 and 7, lot 1, across 
lot 5, Concession 3, between Concessions 1 and 2, lots 1 and 2, between lots 6 and 7, 
Concession 3, between lots 4 and 5, Concessions 1 and 3, between lots 2 and 3, 
Concessions 1 and 2, and on eastern boundary south half Concession 4. 

Township of Pearson: 

Six and a half miles cut out, 6 miles stumped and grubbed, 314 miles graded, 
3,150 ft. ditched, 27 timber and 1 stone culvert constructed on line between lots 
22 and 23 across Concessions 1 to 3, line between lots 20 and 21, Concession 3, line 



174 



EEPOBT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



between lots 17 and 18, Concession 2, and line between Concession 2 and 3, lots 
18 to 20. On the road known as Pearson Trunk Road, situate on line between lots 
6 and 7 across Concession 1 Scoble, and Concession 4 and 5 Pearson, thence along 
line between Concessions 3 and 4, across lots 7 to 10, south between lots 9 and 10, 
across Concessions 2 and 3^ north-west across lot 11, Concession 4, between Con- 
cessions 4 and 5, across lot 12, and between lots 12 and 13, across Concession 5, had 
1 bridge and two culverts repaired, 6 culverts constructed, and 3,035 ft. ditched. 

Township of Scohle : 

One mile of cutting and grading on east and west road across lots 1 to 12 on 
Concessions 1 and 2. 



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Sunday traffic — International Bridge, Pigeon River — ^^Port Arthur and Duluth Railway. 

Toivnship of Stirling : 

One mile and a half of the old Colonization Road was cut out 40 ft. wide, 
stumped and grubbed 20 ft. wide, cross-laid for 50 ft., and 1 culvert constructed. 

Township of Strange : 

Across lots 9 to 12 in Concession 2, the Trunk Road was cut out 40 ft. wide, 

2 miles, and stumped and grubbed 20 ft. wide for l^/o miles. 

Township of Ware : 

On the line between Concessions 2 and 3 across lots 1 to 6, 3 miles were cut 
out, ]% miles burned, and l^/i miles stumped and grublied. On the road knoAvn 
as the " Old Mining Road," from Dawson Road, lot 18 to lot 13, Concessions 2 and 

3 Ware. 1 mile was cut out 50 ft. wide, 1/2 mile stumped and grubbed, 4,370 ft. 
ditched 3 timber culverts constructed, and 669 yds. of gravel used on this road, and 
repairs on the Dawson Road. 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



175 



Appendix No. 45. 
STATEMENTS FOR REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1920 



NEW LISKEARD DEMONSTRATION FARM. 

Work carried on in connection with the Farm during 1920 consisted largely 
of land clearing and in production of an oat crop. Lack of any farm buildings 
made it altogether impracticable to attempt to handle a variety of grain crops or 
field root crops. Therefore, it was deemed advisable to sow only one grain crop, 
viz., oats. Sixty acres were seeded to oats, seven to O.A.C* No. 73 and the balance 
to O.A.C. No. 3. Of the sixty acres, forty-two were new land cropped for the first 
time. A very creditable crop was harvested, the quality number one — the No. 3 
weighed forty pounds per measured bushel just as delivered from the threshing 




O.A.C. No. 72 Oats, grown on the New Liskeard Demonstration Farm, 1920. 

mill. An average yield of forty bushels was realized from the entire field, some 
parts of the field yielded sixty bushels per acre. 

In addition to sixty acres of grain, twenty acres of hay crop was harvested, a 
total crop of eighty acres altogether on the farm. 

Forty acres of new land was seeded down for hay for 1921. Twenty-six acres 
of new land were cleared during the summer and made ready for crop for next 
year. 

The farm gave an approximate yield of: 

Oats 2,500 bushels. 

Hay 40 tons. 

Straw 30 tons. 

The most urgent need of the Farm at the present time is suitable farm 
buildings. The policy of growing and selling hay and grain is not in the best 
interests of the farm and certainly cannot be recommended to Timiskaming agri- 
culture. 



176 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

Short Course in Agriculture and Seed Fair. 

As in former years a Short Course and Seed Fair was lield in the Judging 
Pavilion on the Farm. ■ The following is a detail report on same : 

The Department, in conjunction with the Agricultural Society, held a Short 
Course and Seed Fair from March 23rd to 26th. 

Instructors. 

Prof. C. A. Zavitz, O.A.C., Guelph, Ont. 

E. G. Gordon, B.S.A., Live Stock Branch, Toronto. 

H. G. Bell, Toronto, Ont. 

J. H. Scott, Department of Agriculture, Toronto. 

T/isT OF Donations to Prize List. 

International Harvester Co., O'Grady Bros., Agents $25 00 

The Massey-Harris Company, J. T. Goldthorpe, Agent 25 00 

R. G. Howie, five bushels Abundance Oats, value 10 00 

Hugh Carson Harness Co., Ottawa, The Edwards Agency, Agents, one 

club bag, value 15 00 

B. F. Ackerman Harness Company, Peterboro, The Edwards Agency, 

Agents, set brass mounted halter bridles, value 10 00 

Union Bank of Canada, New Liskeard, silver cup ^ 

Imperial Bank of Canada, New Liskeard, silver cup 

The Fleury Plow Company, O'Grady Bros., Agents, one No. 21 Fleury 

Plow, value 22 00 

List of prize winners as follows: 

Class 1, Oats, O.A.C., No. 3— 

1st, C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

2nd, John Molitor, Earlton, Ont. 

3rd, James Carter, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Section 2, Oats, O.A.C.. No. 72— 

1st, G. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 

Section 3, Oats, Abundance— 

1st, C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd, W. Hermiston, Uno Park, Ont. 

Section ^, Oats, Any Other Variety (White) — 
1st, G. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont 

Sweepstakes in Oats — C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont 

Vlass 2, Wheat, Marquis Spring Wheat — 
1st, C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd, Robt. Ross, Thornloe, Ont. 
3rd, J. M. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 
4th, Geo. Walsh, New Liskeard, Ont. 
5th, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

Section 2, Wheat, Fall Wheat— 

1st, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

Sweepstakes in Wheat — C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

Class 3, Barley, Any Six Rowed Variety — 
1st, G. C. Foster, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd, Jno. Molitor, Earlton, Ont. 
3rd, W. Hermiston, Uno Park, Ont. 

Class Jf, Peas, Large Field Pea — 

. 1st, C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 
2nd, B. Irvine, Hanbury, Ont. 
3rd, T. H. Nickle, Hanbury, Ont. 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



177 



Section 2, Peas. Small Field Pea— 
1st, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 
2nd, Chas. Carter, New Liskeard, Ont. 
3rd, E. David, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Sweepstakes in Peas — C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

Class 0, Grasses, Alsike Seed — 
Section 2 — 

1st, J. R. Philp, R.R. No. 1, New Liskeard. 

2rid, Geo. Walsh, New Liskeard, Ont. 

3rd, Robt. Ross, Thornloe, Ont. 

Section 3, Grasses. Timothy Seed — 
1st, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 

Siccepstak?s in Clover— J. R. Philp, R.R. No. 1, New Liskeard. 

Class 6, Flax — 

1st, C. Thomas, Unq Park, Ont. 




Field of O.A.C., No. 3 Oats, on the New Liskeard Demonstration Farm, 1920. 



Class 7, Potatoes. Irish Cobbler Type — 
1st, T. H. Nickle, Hanbury, Ont. 
2nd, C. Thomas, Uno Park, Ont. 

Section 2. Potatork, Green Mountain Tvne — 
1st, J. M. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 
2nd, A. Doupe, Hanbury, Ont. 
3rd, T. H. Nickle, Hanbury, Ont. 

Sweepstakes in Potatoes — J. M. Gray, New Liskeard, Ont. 

Lectures were held only in the afternoon as it was impossible foe farmers to 
attend in the morning. 

The attendance was very good although not as large as expected. This can 
be explained by the fact that a very large percentage of farmers and farmers' sons 
interested in Short Course work are always busy timbering during the winter. 

The Seed Fair was excellent considering the poor harvest conditions of the 
previous falls. 



EEPOET OF THE No. 3 



Matheson Fakm. 

The above has now been seeded down and taken over by the Agricultural De- 
partment. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



i 



W. G. Xixox, 

Acting Superintendent. 



REPORT OF ONTAEIO GOYERNMEXT CREAMERY, NEW LISKEARD, 

ONTARIO. 

To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests: 

Sir, — I beg to submit report of Creamery from November 1st, 1919, to 
October 31st, 1920. 

As was expected on account of the very wet season in the fall of 1919, and 
the high price and scarcity of feed, a great many farmers disposed of a great 
number of their cows, and a great many that were kept over, came out of the 
stables in very poor condition, and it was well on in the summer before they were 
producing the amount of milk they otherwise would have. We also had two 
private Creameries in the outlying district which took a few of our patrons in the 
Immediate vicinity of them. However, we are able to show an increase in the 
value of business done during the year, and the prices paid were the hio-hest that 
ever were paid in the history of the Creamery husiness. One drawback to the 
dairy industry is the number of star boarders still in a number of the farmers 
herds; this coupled with scrub bull, is a detriment to the industry. However, we 
are glad to report from the number of individual cows we have under test, and the 
i-ampaign on to eliminate the scrub bull, we can now look forward to greater strides 
in the dairy industry. 

The total number of patrons for the past year was two hundred and fifteen. 
The Creamery is growing in favor each year on account of the work it saves the 
women on the farm, and the steady cash revenue on the fifteenth and thirtieth of 
each month. 

There being a great deal more feed in the district this year and the fine open 
fall, we look forward to much larger production of cream this coming winter. 

The following is a summary of business done since we started operations on 
the 18th of August, 1917, to October 31st, 1920 : 

Amount of cream received 838,176 lbs. 

Amount of butter manufactured 267,897 lbs. 

Value of butter manufacturer! $1 41,258 85 

Paid patrons for cream 126,462 52 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. MacLachlan. Manager. 






192021 



DEPART.MEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



179 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE 

For the Sevex Years Ending 31st October, 1920. 
Northern and North-Western Ontario Development Fund. 



Section 



Summary 
of Expendi- 
ture, 23rd 
May, 1912 
to 31st 
October, 
1919 



Expenditure 
for year 

ending 31st 

October, 

1920 



Total 

Expenditure 

to 31st 

October, 

1920 



Section 1 (a) Works and Improvements ■. 2 

Section 1 (b) Roads 5,672 

Section 1 (d) Farms 67 

Section 1 (e) Creamery and Grain Elevators 31 

Section 2 (1) Seed Grain 142 

Section 2 (2) Cattle Purchase Account 18 

Section 2 (6) Fire Protection 

Eeturned Soldiers' and Sailors' Settlement Acts, 1917 

a ;id 1920 971 , 



$ c 
100 00 
721 51 
962 29 
362 57 
532 90 
720 61 



6,906,573 15 
Settlers' Loan Act, Clause 9 (Amending Act. 1918) 485,083 81 



,290,729 

6,795 

7.011 

35,439 

405 

3,773 



2 

6,963 

74 

38 

177 

19 

3 



$ c. 
,100 00 
,451 00 
,757 67 
,374 54 
,972 12 
,126 06 
,773 45 



202,465 241,173,638 51 



1,546,620 20 8,453,193 35 
64,317 82 549,401 63 



7,391,656 961,610,938 029,002,594 98 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 

Under Northern and North-Western Ontario Development Acts, 1912 and 1915. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st OCTOBER, 1920. 

Districts and Sections. 

Expenditure year 

ending 31st Oct., 1920. 

1. Kenora $107,396 18 

2. Thunder Bay 116,8'50 73 

3. Rainy River 71,062 50 

4. Sault Ste. Marie 142,942 18 

5. St. Joseph Island 7,077 17 

6. iSudbury 129,845 13 

7. Nipissing ' 55,567 41 

8. Parry Sound 69,119 59 

9. Muskoka 74,825 46 

10. Simcoe 43,246 ;84 

11. Pembroke, Mattawa, Petawawa 19,505 67 

12. Manitoulin Island 33,758 64 

13. Algonquin Park 7,495 30 

14. Temiskaming 388,612 60 

15. Farms 6,795 38 

16. Creamery 7,011 97 

17. Seed Grain 35,439 22 

18. Cattle Purchase 405 45 

19. Fire Protection (Timmins Townsite) 3,773 45 

20. General Administration 23,424 09 

$1,344,154 96 

21. Returned Soldiers' and Sailors Settlement Act: 

General Account $110,715 11 

Adjustment Account 91,750 13 

202,466 24 

22. Settlers' Loan Account 64,317 82 



$1,610,938 02 



Arthur B. D. Bruce. 

fiecretary and Accountant. 



180 



EEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Statement of E^xpenditure, Year Ending 31st October, 1920. 

Making of Roads: 

Grigg, A., Deputy Minister, salary $400 00 

Wliitson, J. F., the late, Commissioner, salary 

(8 mos.) 3,000 00 

Bruce, A. E. D., Secretary and Accountant, 

salary 3,450 00 

Beardall, F. G., Principal Clerk, salary 2,100 00 

Lawer, W. L., Senior Account Clerk, salary.. 1,900 00 

Dower, A. R., Clerk, salary (11 mos.) 1,374 99 

Dicker, C. L., Clerk, salary (10 mos.) 1,166 66 

, Sinton, Jas., Road Engineer, salary (10 mos.) 2,015 &7 

Reid, A., Map Draughtsman, salary (9 mos.) 1,125 00 

Fleming, Miss E., Junior Clerk (2 mos.) 154 78 

Carefoot, Miss O., Clerk-Stenographer (2 mos.) 147 75 

Caldwell, Miss G., Clerk-Stenographer (2 mos.) 126 64 

$16,961 49 

Wages 702,816 38 

Contracts 137,340 76 

Supplies and equipment 433,6,10 86 

1,273,768 00 

$1,290,729 49 
Advancement of Settlement and Colonization: 

Wages $3,906 09 

Contracts 690 00 

Supplies, stock and equipment 2,199 29 

6,795 38 

Creamery, New Liskeard: 

Wages $3,197 01 

Supplies, equipment, freight and expenses.. 3,814 96 

7.011 97 

Seed Grain: 

Wages $12100 

Seed, freight and expenses 35,318 22 

35,439 22 

Cattle Purchase Account: 

Feed, freight and expenses 405 45 

Fire Protection: 

Wages 3,773 45 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act: 

Wages $25,163 72 

Contracts 470 56 

Material, equipment, supplies, stock and ex- 
penses 85,080 83 

$110,715 11 
Adjustment Account 91,750 13 

202,465 24 

Settlers' Loan Department: 

Dane, F., Commissioner, salary $5,000 00 

Kennedy, W. K. P., Accountant, salary 2,500 00 

Crawford, G., Stenographer, salary 975 00 

$8,475 00 

Net amount of loans issued $55,130 00 

Expenses 712 82 

55,842 82 



$1,546,620 20 



November 13th, 1920. 



64,317 82 
$1,610,938 02 



Arthur E. D. Bruce, 

Secretary anrl AccoHntant.. 



192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



181 



Reventte A.OCOTJNT. 1920. 

The Making of Roads: 

Sale of supplies, stock and equipment, rentals and refunds $6,743 16 

Advancement of Settlement and Colonization: 

Sale of produce, rentals ; 323 75 

Creamery of New Liskeard: 

Butter revenue, sale of buttermilk, coal and cans 5,571 14 

Seed Grain: 

Notes retired, cash sales and freight refunded 18,337 24 

Cattle Purchase Account: 

Notes retired and cash sales 2,096 11 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act: 

Sale of buildings, equipment, provisions, supplies, stock, 

etc., rental and school grant 59,729 98 

Special Warrant Accounts: 

Refunds 28,338 70 

$121,140 08 

Settlers' Loan Account: 

Payments on principal, interest, etc 78,621 00 

Total revenue under all heads, 1920 account $199,761 08 

RECORD OF OORRBSPONDBNCE. 

For Year Ended Sist October, 1920 

Letters received 7,745 

Letters mailed 7,248 

Circulars mailed 1,578 

8.826 

Arthur E. D. Bruce, 

Secretary and Accountant. 



182 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 3 

Appendix No. 46. 
Eepokt of the Board of Adjustment, Appointed April 17th, 1920. 

To Effect Settlements with the Colonists at the Returned 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Colony at Kapuskasing. 

In the Report of the Commission of Enquiry appointed on February 21st, 
J920, certain recommendations were made for the adjustment of the affairs of the 
settlers at Kapuskasing. In order to give effect to these recommendations, the 
Government appointed a Board of Adjustment, consisting of Brigadier-Ceneral 
J. A. Gunn, Professor A Leitch and A. S. Morgan, on April 17th, 1920. Later 
Dr. Albert H. Abbott was named as Secretary of this Board. This Board of 
Adjustment was empowered to effect settlements in the case of each settler, and for 
its guidance the following basis of adjustment was authorized by the Government. 

Regulations Under Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land 
Settlement Act, 1920. 

1. The adjusting officers shall be the adjusting officers appointed under the 
Northern and North-Western Ontario Development Act, 1912, 2 Geo. Y, Chap. 2, 
and such adjusting officers shall be authorized to appoint such officers, employees 
and servants as they may require, at such wages, remuneration or salary as they may 
deem expedient for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of the Returnel 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Amendments Act, 1920'. 

2. The adjusting officers shall be authorized to hold such hearings and take 
such evidence on oath or otherwise as they may deem necessary, and to make such 
awards, settlements and grants as provided in paragraphs 11 (a) and 11 (h) of 
the said amendments of Act, at such places and at such times as they may deter- 
mine. That subject to amendments by the adjusting officers as hereinafter pro- 
vided, the basis upon which any award, settlement or grant shall be made shall 
be as follows : 

(a) The houses and buildings erected upon the settlers' location shall be 
valued, and the settlers' building account with the Northern Development Branch 
shall be adjusted in accordance with such valuation. 

(&) Each settler, who has not ceased to be a member of the Colony, shall be 
given the privilege of electing either to remain in the Colony or to leave it. 

(c) In the event of a settler electing to leave the Colony, in accordance with 
the provisions of paragraph (h), the value of the obligation of the Department 
for the ten-acre clearing ready for the plough, either done or to be done, shall 
be fixed at $1,000.00, and the settlers' general account with the said Branch shall 
be credited with that amount. 

(d) In the event of any settler having any clearing ready for the plough 
beyond the Government ten acres, he shall be credited in addition to the amount 
mentioned in paragraph (c) at the rate of $50.00 per acre for not more than ten 
acres, and the value of any additional partial clearance by the settler shall be fixed 
by the adjusting officers and credited to the settleT. 

(e) Each settler being indebted for animals purchased shall return the same 
to the Government and be credited with the purchase price, including any cash 
already paid by him on account thereof. 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 183 

(/) Credit shall be given to the settler for all saw-logs, pulpwood, railway ties, 
or other timber cut by him but not delivered. 

(g) Each settler shall be entitled to free transportation for himself, his family 
and effects, to any point in Ontario chosen by him. 

(h) That from the aggregate of the value of the houses and other buildings, 
as ascertained in accordance with paragraph (a), and the said sum of $1,000,00 
under the provisions of paragraph (c), and any sums due to the settler under the 
provisions of paragraphs (d), (e) and (/), shall be deducted the indebtedness of 
the settler up to and including the date hereof, provided that such balance due to 
any settler shall be deemed to be not less than $500.00, subject to the deduction of 
any indebtedness incurred after the date hereof. Any such balance shall be paid 
to him in monthly instalments of $100.00; the first of such payments to be made 
on the date of the adjusting account hereinafter referred to, and such first payment 
to be subject to the deduction therefrom of the amount of the settler's indebtedne.^s 
to the said Branch incurred after the date hereof. 

(i) The Adjusting Officers may authorize the payment of the whole or any 
portion of any balance, as provided in paragraph (e), in a lump sum, either on the 
date of the adjusting account or at such time as they may deem advisable. 

(;') In the event of d settler electing to remain in the Colony, in accordance 
with the provisions of paragraph (&), the settler shall have the privilege of receiv- 
ing as a gift, a horse from amongst those at the Colony, and a half set of double 
harness, and the sum of $200.00, payable quarterly in advance; the first of such 
payments to be made upon the date of the adjusting account. Priority of selection 
of horses to be determined by priority of application to enter the Colony. 

(h) If any settler does not desire to accept a horse and harness, as provided 
in paragraph (;'), he shall be given $450.00 in lieu of the horse, harness and 
$200.00 as provided in paragraph (j). 

(I) Farms left vacant by those settlers who elect to leave the Colony at 
Kapuskasing shall be available for transfer to those at outlying points who elect 
to remain. The terms of adjustment shall be settled by the Adjusting Officers, 

(m) Seed grain necessary for seeding each settler's available land during the 
spring of 1920 shall be supplied free, provided that such settler furnished to the 

Adjusting Officers a statement of the area of such available land before 

day of 1920, and the acreage of each crop he intends to plant. The 

choice shall be confined to spring wheat, oats, barley, timothy and clover seed. 

(n) The Adjusting Officers shall provide each settler at present at the 
Colony with a statement of his adjusting account. The form to be used for a 
settler who elects to leave the Colony shall be that attached hereto, marked " Form 
No. 1," and the form to be used for the settler who elects to remain shall be 
marked " Form No. 2," and such respective forms of account, when completed and 
executed by the Chairman of the Adjusting Officers on behalf of those officers, and 
by the settler, and in the case of a married settler by his wife, shall be conclusive 
as to the facts stated therein, and shall be sufficient authority for payment of any 
monies shown therein to be due to him or on his account. 

(o) Notwithstanding any provisions in these regulations contained, the Ad- 
justing Officers may alter, amend, or vary the terms of these regulations as they 
in their absolute discretion may deem expedient or advisable. 



184 REPOET OF TELE No. 3 

After studying the question for some days, the Chairman of the Board drew 
the attention of the Prime Minister to certain matters connected with the settle- 
ments, and received for the guidance of the Committee a letter as follows : 

Toronto, April 24th, 1920. 
"My dear , General Gunn, — 

" I am writing this letter as a general instruction from myself and the Govern- 
ment with regard to the settlement of the affairs of the settlers at Kapuskasing. 

" You are already familiar with the terms of the basis of adjustment, and these 
must stand. Recognizing, however, the correctness of the statement made by the Com- 
mission of Enquiry on page 12 of the printed report, we have added a paragraph which 
gives the Board very full discretion in the application of the general principles laid 
down. The Commissioners' statement is: 'They are convinced that no solution of the 
difficulty can be proposed which will be equally fair to all parties,' and the paragraph 
which we have added to the Basis of Adjustment is as follows: 

" ' Notwithstanding any provisions in these regulations contained, the adjusting 
officers may alter, amend or vary the terms in these regulations as they in their abso- 
lute discretion may deem expedient or advisable.' 

" In using the discretionary power given to the Board, I would suggest that two 
general principles be kept in mind: (1) We wish, in the treatment of all settlers, to 
err on the side of generosity rather than to strive to drive a hard bargain v^rith them; 
(2) We wish that those who have been successful, and who elect to remain at Kapus- 
kasing, should be treated rather more generously than those who elect to leave the 
Colony. 

" We have been informed that the adjustment of the alleged overcharges in the 
cost of the houses could be simplified by giving the settler credit for what he has paid 
on his house and ignoring the balance of indebtedness which stands on the books 
against him in the ' House ' account. We wish you to consider whether this would be 
a fair and simple solution of the difficulty. 

" While the above will apply to by far the greater number of houses, we are in- 
formed that some houses have been built which have cost the settler up to twice as 
much as the standard house recommended by the Government. We feel that in erect- 
ing these more expensive houses, the settlers must assume responsibility for their 
judgment, and we suggest that you consider limiting the value of any house to say 
$800.00, or at most $1,000.00. This would mean that no matter how much the settler 
may have actually spent on his house, he would not be allowed more for it than the 
maximum set. 

" In dealing with those who elect to remain at Kapuskasing, we feel that one con- 
sideration has been omitted from the Basis of Adjustment. When the settlers went 
to Kapuskasing, under the original plan, they were promised, (1) a free grant of 100 
acres of land, (2) the clearing of ten acres at the expense of the Government, (3) a 
grant of $150.00 toward the huilding of a house. In the Basis of Adjustment, no men- 
tion is made of the obligation of the Government to complete the clearing of the ten 
acres in cases in which that amount of land has not been cleared. We recognize our 
obligation in the case of those who elect to leave the colony by paying them $100.00 
an acre up to ten acres whether the land has been cleared or not, and we feel that 
the same consideration should be given to those who elect to remain, namely, in the 
event of less than ten acres having been cleared, we should allow such settlers at the 
rate of $100.00 an acre for the balance of the ten acres. This would be in addition to 
the provision made in Section 4 of the Basis of Adjustment. 

" Further, in Section 4 (c) it is provided that those who elect to remain may 
select the land of those who elect to leave, and ' in such cases generous terms of ad- 
justment should be given by the Government.' I feel that no general rule can be made 
with regard to these terms, and therefore the Government leaves the making of these 
termg in each specific case wholly in the hands of the Board. 

" The Government recognizes that a somewhat difficult task has been laid before 
you and your Board, and we wish you to feel that we have every confidence that the 
terms of settlement which you propose will be as equitable to each settler as they can 
be made. Complete fairness as between different settlers may be impossible to attain, 
but in that case we wish the settlers to feel that, while the settlement may be more 
generous to one than to another, it is intended that it should be generous to all. This 
applies particularly in the application of Section S (d). If the settler recognizes that 
what the Government wishes to do is to provide every man who leaves the colony 
with at least $500 to start him in his new life, it will probably be seen that it is hardly 
right to speak of any settlement as being unfair. 

" Special mention should also be made of one class of settlers, namely, those who 
have spent but a few months in Kapuskasing. They went there knowing the condi- 
tions. I think all of them were connected in some way by blood ties with persons who 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 185 



were already there. The Government did not assume the same obligations in their 
case as with the original settlers. I would suggest, therefore, that instead of feeling 
bound to allow them $1,000 for the clearing of ten acres, you should consider making 
a grant to them in no case to exceed $500. This would be done not as a recognition 
of a Government obligation, but in order to help them to become established in any 
new occupation they may take lup. 

" Yours very truly, 

"(Signed) E. C. Drury. 
" Brigadier-General J. A. Gunn, 

" Chairman, Board of Adjustors for Kapuskasing Settlers, 
" Toronto, Ont." 

On April 24th the Board proceeded to Kapuskasing, and arrived there in the 
evening of the 25th. The settlers who had elected to leave the Colony were notified 
that the Board would meet them in the morning of April 26th. By Thursday 
evening, April 39th, the Board had effected settlements with sixty-one settlers who 
had decided to leave the Colony. In effecting these settlements the Board was 
assisted by Mr. Charles Lennox, architect, who visited the houses and other build- 
ings and placed a valuation upon them, an'd by Mr. G. F. Summers, O.L.S., who 
measured the land cleared or partly cleared. A special train was ordered for these 
departing settlers and their effects, and on Saturday afternoon, May 1st, the train 
left Kapuskasing with practically all those who had decided not to remain. This 
train arrived in Toronto on Monday morning, and was met by representatives of 
the Citizens' Eepatriation League, who saw that every settler remaining in Toronto 
had proper accommodation until permanent quarters could be secured, and those 
who were taking trains out of the city were assisted in every possible way. The 
Board of Adjustment is greatly indebted to the Citizens' Eepatriation League, not 
only for this service, but also for helping the settlers in many ways to become 
established in their new homes. Within two weeks most of the settlers were either 
actually established in their new surroundings, or were well on the way to becoming 
established. Most of the men who left Kapuskasing have either purchased farms, 
or have gone to work on fanns during the summer months, awaiting a more 
favourable opportunity for purchasing in the fall. A few of them have gone into 
their old lines of business, and a few have taken positions in manufacturing estab- 
lishments. The Board felt that it should do everything in its power to assist these 
men to become settled in the kind of work in which they wished to engage, and 
any advice it could give, or any assistance it could render, which should be placed 
at their disposal ; consequently, it arrange'd with the Citizens' Eepatriation League 
to do for these settlers what it had been doing so efficiently during the past year 
for returned soldiers. 

In the afternoon of April 26th the settlers who had elected to ren;ain at 
Kapuskasing were met, and the general basis of settlement was discussed with 
them. However, on account of the fact that the basis suggested did not seem 
adequate, the Board decided to reach settlements with these men after it had had 
an opportunity of talking the matter over with members of the Government. A 
general basis of settlement was reached immediately 'following the return of the 
Board to Toronto, and the settlers were notified of the suggested settlement by 
letter on May 10th. On May 29th, the secretary proceeded to Kapuskasing, and 
was able, on Monday, May 31st, to effect settlements with all those remaining at 
the Colony. 



186 REPOET OF THE to. 3 

Basis of Settlement With Those who Elected to Leave the Colony. 

The general basis on which the Board proceeded in effecting settlements was 
as follows: 

1. Houses. As the Government was taking over the property of the settlers 
leaving the Colony, it did not seem important to determine whether there had been 
an overcharge made when the houses were built for the settlers. Consequently, 
the Government grant of $150 was allowed in each case where the settler had a 
house, and the settler was paid for any additions he had made to the house at 
his own expense. This avoided the necessity of entering into an intricate calcula- 
tion which could only, in any case, have been roughly approximate to the actual 
facts. For this reason, in its basis of settlement, the Board made no reference to 
the value of the house, or to the house account on the Colony books, settlement being 
effected under two headings as follows : 

1. Government grant allowed. 

2. Labor and materials allowed. 

2. Buildings other titan Houses. A valuation was agreed upon between the 
settler and the Board, and this amount was allowe'd. 

3. Land. According to the basis of adjustment, $1,000 was allowed for the 
ten acres which the Government had agreed to clear for the settlers under the old 
scheme, and due allowance was ma'de for any clearing which the settlers had done 
on their own account on the basis of a maximum of. $50 an acre for fully cleared 
land. Due allowance was also made for ploughing done, at the rate of $10 an 
acre, and for the cost of seed and seeding done. 

4. Wood, Cut hut not Delivered. Allowance was made the settlers for wood 
cut but, not delivered on the following basis : 

Sawlogs, approximately $1 00 a log. 

Pulpwood 4 00 a cord. 

Cordwood 2 00 a cord. 

Various other matters had to be adjusted, but the Board refused to attempt 
to make adjustment in all matters upon which accurate information was not avail- 
able. This covered certain matters in dispute between the settlers and the Colony 
Superintendent from 1917 down. In particular, no allowance was made for work 
alleged to have been done in connection with contracts which had been let to the 
settlers, but which were later cancelled. However, it may be said that had the 
Board made allowance for all such work at the valuation placed upon it by the 
settler, a very moderate sum, not exceeding $1,000, would have been involved. 

From the total due to the settler, according to the above basis, was deducted 
the amount standing against him in the supply account, store account and horse 
and cow account on the books of the Colony, and from the net balance due the 
settler were deducted any advances which had been made to him through Eev. H. 
J. King — which had, of course, already been paid. "'' 

Basis of Settlement With Those who Elected to Eemain at Kapuskasing. 

After meeting the settlers who intended to remain at Kapuskasing, and ascer- 
taining from their representations that they were not satisfied with the basis of 
adjustment proposed by the Commission of Enquiry (namely, a grant of $450, or 
its equivalent), and as this agreed with the view already reached by the Adjusting 
Officers, we decided to recommend a new basis for the consideration of the Govern- 
ment. After going into the matter very thoroughly, and considering in particular 
what effect an allowance for the balance of the land uncleared, in the ten acres 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND EOEESTS. 187 

which the Government had agreed to clear, would have, we decided to recommend 
a grant of $1,000 to each settler. This was accepted by the Government, and 
accordingly the following principles were adopted as a basis of settlement : 

1. A grant of $1,000 was made to each settler, and particularly to those under 
the '■ old scheme." Those under the " new scheme " were treated according to the 
■circumstances in each case. 

2. All alleged overcharges on the house accounts were adjusted. 

3. All the settler's indebtedness to the Colony was deducted from the amount 
.•allowed him. 

4. Seed grain, etc., was provided free for sowing in the spring of 1920. , 

5. Certain of the farm machinery returned by the settlers who had left, or 
Avhich was otherwise in the possession of the Colony, was given to the settlers. 

6. In the case of the transfer of settlers to lots vacated by those leaving the 
'Colony, we proceeded on the following basis : 

The value of the land and buildings formerly held was compared with the 
yalue of the land and buildings on the lot desiredy and approximately 25 per cent, 
•of the difference was charged the settler for making the transfer. Several transfers 
weie, however, made on even terms, and in the case of those on. the "new scheme" 
a few transfers were made in lieu of the grant of $1,000, or a large part. of it. 

7. Settlers were allowed to apply for the reservation of lots for their sons on 
terms to be settled by the Government. 

Attached to this Report will be found statements showing the amount of seed 
grain, etc., allowed each settler, and the farm machinery given to the settlers. We 
:also attach a copy of a letter sent to each settler remaining at Kapuskasing. This 
letter states the views of the settlers and the replies of the Adjusting Officers, and 
it thus is important in connection with the settlement. 

We have also made out complete statements of the settlements effected, and 
these are attached hereto. These statements show the following : 

Eighty-three settlers, on the Colony books on May 1st, have left Kapuskasing. 
-In the case of six of these eighty-three, addresses were not known, or for other 
reasons no settlement was asked for by them. 

Twenty settlers elected to remain at Kapuskasing. 

One hundred and three settlers, that is, all on the list as eligible for settle- 
ment, are thus accounted for, and of these, settlements were effected with ninety- 
j-even. 

Of the six with whom settlements were not made, the following may be said: 

Wm. Gauthier was entered on Land Settlement Scheme on October 29tli; 
1919, under the new scheme. He left the Colony on November 16th, 1919. The last 
Jiddress known for him was Xushka, Ont. He was hot regarded as meriting con- 
sideration. 

Bexjamix Halliwell was entered on Land Settlement Scheme on July 5th, 
1918. He left the Colony on June 14th, 1919, on two weeks' sick leave, since when 
110 information has been received of his whereabouts. As coming under the old 
scheme he might make a claim for the grant of $1,000 for ten acres of land, but 
we should not have allowed him more, tlian $250 in any case, and believe he is 
actually not entitled to anything. 

Arsene Huar'd entered on Land Settlement Scheme on September 5th, 1919, 
under the new scheme. He left the Colony on November 5th, 1919, expecting to 
return in the spring of 1920, but nothing has been heard of him, and his address 
is not known. He is not entitled to consideration in any case. 



188 EEPOET OF THE No. a 

John Innes entered on Land Settlement Scheme May 7th, 1918, and left 
the Colony on February 21st, 1919, requiring surgical treatment and mentally 
deranged. He is now in the Manitoba Provincial Hospital at Selkirk, Man. We 
have corresponded with the Superintendent and learn that he has no dependents, and 
that he is now under the care of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment. 
He is apparently an incurable case. Had he been at the Colony he would have 
received at least a grant of $150 on his house and $1,000 on his land, but we 
believe no settlement is necessary. 

T. T. Lewis entered on Land Settlement Scheme on March 26th, 1918, and 
left the Colony for medical treatment on December 8th, 1919. He lived at Port 
Hope, but we have been unable to learn more of his whereabouts, and a letter 
addressed to the Mayor of Port Hope brought no reply. He apparently had no 
house at Kapuskasing, and therefore he could receive consideration only on the 
land grant. We believe he need not be further considered. 

W. G. Moffat entered on Land Settlement Scheme September 25th, 1918, and 
left the Colony on May 4th, 1919, for three months' leave at Hamilton, Ont. The 
last address known for him there was 767 Barton Street. He had a house at 
Kapuskasing, which was valued at $729,00, as against a cost, according to his 
house account, of $542.31 plus $150.00— $692.31. We believe the house should be 
taken over and the house account cancelled, and that no attempt should be made 
to follow the matter further. 

The settlements effected with those leaving the Colony show the following 
totals : 

Valuation of houses $47,572 00 

House accounts cancelled $25,526 80 

Allowed settlers on houses 12,868 00 

Excess of valuation over accounts cancelled and amounts allowed 9,177 20 

$47,572 00 $47,572 00 

Valuation of barns and outbuildings $15,708 00 

Allowed settlers on these $11,287 00 

Excess of valuation over amount allowed 4,421 00 

$(15,708 00 $15,708 00 

Total amount allowed settlers $99,872 91 

Indebtedness $23,055 82 

Amount advanced through Rev. H. J. King 1,248 99 

Cash paid out 75,568 10 



$99,872 91 $99,872 91 

The settlements effected with the twenty settlers remaining at Kapuskasing 
show the following totals : 

Grants allowed $17,389 60 

Overcharges on houses allowed 650 00 

Credit on books 322 35 



Total allowed $18,361 95 

Amount charged for making transfers $1,025 00 

Indebtedness 13,510 67 

Total credits to settlers ." . . $4,886 59 

Total debits to settlers 1,060 31 

Amount of cash paid out ,3,826 28 3,826 28 

$18,361 95 $18,361 95 



1920-21 DEPAETMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 189 



These statements show the following cost to the Government of this whole 
settlement : 

House Accounts Cancelled: 

Settlers leaving Colony $25,526 80 

Settlers remaining in Colony , . 5,263 07 



Supply Accounts Cancelled: 

Settlers leaving Colony $10,799 21 

Settlers remaining in Colony 2,171 65 

Store Accounts Cancelled: 

Settlers leaving Colony $11,302 86 

Settlers remaining in Colony 1,150 07 

Other Accounts Cancelled: 

Settlers leaving Colony $953 75 

Settlers remaining in Colony 5,357 88 

Allowed through Rev. King 1,248 99 



Cash Paid Out: 

To siettlers leaving Colony $75,568 10 

To settlers remaining in Colony 3,826 28 



$30,789 87 



12,970 86 



12,452 93 



7,560 62 



79,394 38 



$143,168 66 



Against this the Government receives cleared land, on which no valuation can 
be made, and houses and out-buildings valued as follows : 

Houses $47,572 00 

Barns, etc 15,708 00 



$63,280 00 



Deducting the value of the Buildings from the total cost of the settlement to 
the Government — transportation charges and other incidental expenses not con- 
sidered — we get : 

Total cost •. $143,168 66 

Value of buildings 63,280 00 



$79,888 66 
or approximately the amount of cash paid out. 

It is evident, therefore, that the Government has paid approximately $8Q,000 
to get back the land, cleared and uncleared, set aside for the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Colony at Kapuskasing, with the exception of the twenty lots held by settlers still 
remaining in the Colony. At this cost, it has satisfied the hundred settlers that 
the Government wanted to deal fairly by them. Indeed, it might be said that most 
of the settlers would admit that the Government had treated them generously 
rather than merely fairly. 

Respectfully submitted by, 

(Sgd.) J. A. GuNN, 

Chairman. 

(Sgd.) Albert H. Abbott, 

Secretary. 



190 REPOKT OF THE No. a 

Copy. 
Farm Machineky for Yorkville Settlers. 

2 discs 

2 sets harrows 

2 walking ploughs 

1 mower 

1 seeder 

1 roller 

1 hay rake . . - 

2 one-horse cultivators 
1 double wagon 

1 single wagon 

2 sets sleighs. 

Approved by General Gunn. (Sgd.) A. Leitcu. 

In addition to the above tlie following articles were allowed to settlers in the 
final settlement : 

1 set sleighs 
1 single wagon 

Farm Machinery Sold to Settlers. 



1 hillside plough 

1 spring tooth harrow 

1 disc harrow 

1 single wagon 

1 set sleighs 

1 sawing machine 

1 forge 

1 anvil 

1 grinder and bagger 

2 pointers (boats). 



I 



1920-21 DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 


191 


SEED FOR 1920 


Nauie 


Red Clover Timothy 


Oats 


Barley 


Peas 


Wheat 


Potatoes 




Endicott : 

York 

Ridley 


lbs. 
50 ■ 
75 
90 
35 
35 
110 
30 
30 
80 
50 
75 
30 
90 
50 
50 
40 


lbs. 
35 
50 
60 
25 
25 
70 
80 
80 
55 
35 
50 
90 
60 
75 
50 
20 


bus. 
17 
10 
10 


bus. 
4 
5 
5 


bus. 

'"b" 
5 


bus. 
2 


bags 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




Dertinger 




Foran 




1 






Wing 

Mairs .... 


14 
25 
25 
25 


5 


7 






Call M W 








LeMarier 


1 3 






Nash 




McMinn 


10 


5 


5 






Poolton 




Ryan 

Sprague 


15 

30 
5 


7 


5 






Currie -, 








Gough 






1 Millet 










1 Buckwheat 


Total 

Cripps, Nephew ol 
Wing, wants 


920 
75 


860 
50 


1S6 
12 


31 


30 
5 


2 


16 
1 


1 Millet 
25 Rape 


On hand 


995 


910 
250 


198 


31 


35 

30 


2 
2 


17 


72 Millet 












25 Rape 


To Order 


995 


660 


198 


31 


i ^ 




17 


1 bu. buck- 




wheat 



Copy of Letter Sent to Settlers on May IOtii, ee Suggested Settlement. 



Be the Adjustment to he made with the Settlers remaining at Kapushasing. 

Dear Sir, — The Boafd of Adjustment, in accordance with the promise made 
to the settlers remaining at Kapuskasing, has had a conference with the Govern- 
ment relative to the basis of settlement with these men, and we are now able to 
report the general basis upon which such scheme will be eflfected. 

In the basis approved by the Government, in accordance with the report of 
the Commission of Investigation, the settlers electing to remain were to receive 
$450 in cash or its equivalent value, and they were to have the privilege of trans- 
ferring to lots left vacant by those leaving the Colony on terms which should be 
approved by the Government. It was also provided that seed for this spring's 
sowing should be supplied to these settlers free of charge. 

Also, the settlers electing to remain were advised to form a school section 
as quickly as possible, and the Government was to pay the salary of the teachers, 
or teacher, for at least two years. 

The settlers who wished to remain in the Colony did not think these terms 
as favourable as were the terms proposed to those electing to leave, and they pre- 
sented to us certain suggestions, which were as follows: 

1. That settlers whose ten -acre lots are not yet ready for the plough, be paid 
for completing stumping, or that the Government finish the job. 

2. That all settlers remaining be placed on an equal footing. 



192 EEPOET OF THE No. 3 

3. That slashing and burning contracts to the value of $500 be given to each 
settler for the year 1920, and the same for 1921. 

4. That settlers remaining be given their patent, and have their building loan 
cancelled. 

5. That settlers be allowed to reserve lots for their sons. 

6. That so long as horses remain on the Colony farm, settlers continue to get 
the use of them under the same conditions as at present. 

7. That settlers be permitted to buy food at cost from the Colony farm, so 
long as the farm is in operation. 

8. That farm implements be provided for the use of settlers. 

9. That as twelve children of school age now reside in Yorkville, a school be 
provided for them at once. 

10. That settlers have preference in all work to be done at the Colony farm. 
In answer to these suggestions we stated that they would have to be taken 

up with the Government, and we now are able to give answer to them as follows : 

1. The suggestion regarding the allowance for uncleared land would be adopted 
in principle, no settler to receive more than one thousand dollars for ten acres. 

2. This suggestion will automatically come into effect by the abandonment of 
the scheme, and broadly, in the settlement now to be made those on the new scheme 
will be treated practically the same as those on the old. 

3. The Ontario Government will not provide work for settlers, but this is not 
necessary, as Mr. Ballantyne, of the Dominion Government- Farm, assures us that 
he can give employment to all those remaining, in connection with the Dominion 
Government Farm. 

4. We could not recommend, nor would the Government consider, the granting 
of patents on any basis more favourable than that already provided in the settle- 
ment scheme. 

5. There is no objection whatever to settlers reserving lots for their sons, but 
such reservations will have to be made in the regular way, and not as a special 
favour to be granted by our Board. The only consideration which could be allowed 
would be that certain terms might be arranged with regard to the work to be done 
on such reserved lots, which would be of more advantage, both to the settler and 
his sons, than would be the case were their work divided. The beginning of the 
clearing on the sons' lot might be delayed for a reasonable time. TJiis, however, 
will be a matter of individual adjustment. 

6. So long as horses remain on the Colony Farm settlers may continue to 
get the use of them under the old conditions, but it is understood that this can 
be for a limited time only, as horses will not be retained on this farm by the 
Government after the final settlement has been made. 

7. -Settlers may buy feed at cost from the Colony Farm so long as the farm 
is in operation and has such feed to sell. 

8. It has already been provided that settlers may receive farm implements 
free of charge when recommended by the Board, but no indiscriminate distribution 
of implements is to be made. 

9. While no formal settlement with regard to the location of a school in 
Yorkville has been made, the Government is entirely favourable to such an arrange- 
ment as the Yorkville settlers suggested to the Board, viz., the Government would 
supply the materials and the settlers would themselves construct the school build- 
ing free of charge. Until such time as this building is constructed a house suggested 
by the Yorkville settlers may be used as a school building, it being understood 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AXD FOEESTS. 193 

that any arrangement regarding the school will not be effective until the begin- 
ning of the school term next fall. 

10. As the Colony Farm is not to be operated by the Government there will 
be no opportunity of the Government carrying this suggestion into effect. 

When we came to consider a basis of adjustment, we reached the conclusion 
that the most equitable to the settlers as a whole would be that a grant of one 
thousand dollars to each settler remaining in the Colony should be made, it being 
understood that this amount was to be applied in the first instance to the wiping 
out of any indebtedness up to April 30th which there might -be on the books of 
the Colony against these settlers, and that so far as may be considered advisable, 
debts incurred, under the recommendation of the Board of Adjustment, since 
April 30th, should be covered also; this, however, to be done in such a way that 
it will not unduly embarrass the settler. That is to say, each individual case will 
have to be considered with regard to the payment of debts incurred since April 
30th. With regard to the individual settlers, always bearing in mind that debts 
incurred since April 30th are not here included, this would mean the following 
adjustments : 

The Board purposes to have the secretary proceed to Kapuskasing in the near 
future and have the necessary agreements signed by the settlers. In the meantime 
it is understood that the above statement covers the settlements which the Board 
is willing to make, with the exception of minor adjustments which may be necessary 
or advisable in individual cases. 

The fact of any settler acting on statements contained in this letter l)efore 
he actually signs the agreement with the Government is to be taken as clear evidence 
that he accepts the terms herein proposed, and that he understands that the accept- 
ance of these terms releases the Government from any obligation, real or implied, 
which was undertaken with the settler under the Eeturned Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Land Settlement Act. It is, of course, understood that no money is to be paid 
out to complete this settlement until the papers are actually signed. 

(Here Follows the Settlement in the Case of the Settler Addressed). 

1 
Part of the cash balance will be withheld until you proceed to build a house. 
This will be adjusted with you later. . ■ 

Yours faithfully, 

(Sgd.) Albert H. Abbott, 
Secretary, Board of Adjustment, Kapuskasing Colony. 



13 L.F. 



194 



EEPOET OF THE 



Xo. 3 



SETTLEMENTS EFFECTED WITH SETTLERS REMAINING AT 



Name; property held or 

transferred to; and 
reservations requested 



Land cleared or 
partly cleared 



Valuation of Buildings 



House Other bldsrs. 



Amount Allowed 



Grant 
aUowed 



Overcharge 

on house a/c 

allowed 



Call, M. W.— 
Lot9, Con. 9, O'Brien. 



Car on, Lean — 
Transferred to Lot 18. 

Con. 13, O'Brien 

Currie, A. S. — 

Lot 5, Con. 16, Ow^ens. . . 
Darmet, C. H.— 
Transferred to Lot 19, 

Con. 14, O'Brien 

Dertinger, Adam — 
Lot 22. Con. 8, O'Brien 
transferred to Lot 22. 
Con. 9, O'Brien. Asked 
reservation for son-in- 
law but no action .... 
Endicott, E. B.— 
Lot 28 Cons. 10 and 11, 
O'Brien. Asked reser- 
vation foi- son Arthur. 
Lot 27, Cons. 10 «& 11. 
O'Brien, to cost $300.00. 



Foram, David — 
Lot 24, Con. 8, O'Brien, 
transferred to Lots 25, 
& 26, Con. 10, O'Brien. 
Asked reservation for 
sister Bridget E.Forao. 
Lot 27, Cons. 9 & 10. 
O'Brien 

Gough, Wm. — 
Lot 20, Cons. 13 and 14. 
O'Brien. Asked reser- 
vations for son Walter, 
Lot 20, Con. 15,0'Bvien, 
and for son Frank, Lot 
19, Con. 15, O'Brien... 

LeMarier, M. — 
Lot 18, Con. 8, O'Brien, 
Transferred to Lot 19, 
Con. 13, O'Brien 

Mairs, A. A. — 
Lot 8, Con. 11, O'Brien, 
transferred to Lot 9, 
Cons. 10 & 11, O'Brien. 

McMinn, W. — 
Lot 3, Con. 16, Owens. 
Asked reservations for 
son Wra. Gordon, Lot 1, 
Con. 17, Owens, and for 
son Harry, Lot 2, Con. 
17, Owens 



8ac. cleared, 2ac. 
to stump and 
burn 



10 ac. slashed only 



5 ac. cleared, 5 ac. 
to stump and 
burn 



10 ac. ready for 
plough 



3 ac. cleax'ed, 7 ac 
to stump and 
burn 



$ c. 
590 00 



582 00 



not examined 



on old lot 
150 00 



1,384 00 



on old lot 
259 00 



on old lot 
525 00 



680 00 



$ c. 



15 00 



147 00 



756 00 



198'00 



$ c. 
1,000 00 



1,000 uO 
200 00 

1,000 00 



1,000 00 



l.OC-O 00 



1,075 12 



1,000 00 



1,000 00 



1,000 00 



$ c. 



100 OfJ 



1920-21 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS. 



195 



KAPUSKASING BY THE ADJUSTMENT BOARD, APRIL-JULY, 1920. 



Indebtedness 



Or. on I Total 



books 



Credits House 

a/c 



Supply 

a/c 



Store 

a/c 



Horse 
or cow 

a/c 



Indebt- 
edness 
since 
April 30. 
1920 



Charge 
for 

transfer- 
ring to 

other lot 



Total in- 
debtedness 



Net balance 

due to or 

from settler 



$ c. $ c, 



1,000 00 



$ c. 



351 03 



$ c. $ c. 



104 57 



155 55 



$ c. 



$ c. $ 



$ c 



611 15 



$ c. 



388 85 Or. 



33 35 



289 00 



1,000 00 
200 00 

1,000 00 



1,000 00 



1,038 35 



1,364 12 



1,000 00 



1,000 00 



27 26 



251 23 



500 00 



287 50 



132 75 



1,100 00 644 75 188 41 



83 83 



607 10 



690 93 



22 55 



281 79 



331 60 



309 07Cr. 
200 OOCr. 

668 40Cr. 



153 48 



12 26 



641 39 



105 63 



20 33 



222 73 



290 00 



207 76 



1,008 10 



255 31 125 00 



163 00 



450 54 



294 85 



250 00 



200 00 



9161 204 84 1,129 61 29 61 Dr. 



8 lODr 



412 90 



1,814 66 



995 35 



332 75 



620 45 Cr. 



450 54 Dr. 



4 65 Cr. 



667 25 Cr. 



196 



KEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SETTLEMENTS EFFECTED WITH SETTLERS REMAINING AT KAPUSKASING 



Name; property held or 

transferred to; and • 
reservations requested 



Land cleared or 
partly cleared 



Valuation of Buildings 



House 



Other 
Buildinsrs 



Amount allowed 



Grant 
allowed 



Overcharge 

on house a/c 

allowed 



Nash, J — 

Lot 3, Con. 15, Owens. . . 

Packer, W. M.— 
Lot 2R, Con. 14, Owens. 
Transferred to Lot 24 

Con. 11, O'Brien 

Poolton, T.— 
Lot 19, Con. 12, O'Brien. 

Ridley, J.— 

Lot 2, Con. 15, Owens. 
Transferred to Lot 28, 

Con. 15, O'Brien 

Ryan, P.— 

Lot 29, Con. 15. O'Brien. 
Transferred to Lot 16. 

Con. 12, O'Brien 

Sprague, W. — 

Lot 6, Con. 9, O'Brien. 

Transferred to Lots 7 

and 8, Con. 10, O'Brien 

Straiten, H. — 

Lots 25 and 26, Con. 11, 

O'Brien 

Wing, J.— 

Lot 1, Con. 15 &16, Owens. 
Asked reservation for 
nephew Oliver Cripps, 
Lot 2, Con. 16, Owens 
to cost 300.00 



York, W. H.— 
Lot 1, Con. 14, Owens. ., 



10 ac to stump 
and burn 



10 ae. ready for 
plough 



Not examined. 



ji cleai"ed, 1 to 
bur n, 8^ to 
stumpand burn 

3 cleai'ed, 7 to 
stump an i burn 



$ c. 
680 00 



764 00 



on old lot 
425 00 



on old lot 
360 00 



on old lot 
750 00 



not exam i lied 



805 00 



693 00 



95 00 



75 00 



804 00 



338 00 
305 00 



$ c. 
1,000 00 



1,000 00 

],ooo no 

1,000 00 

1,114 48 
1,000 00 

1,000 00 
1,000 00 



17,389 60 



$ c. 



100 CO 



250 00 

200 00 
650 00 



Summary — 

Total amount allowed settlers $18,331 95 

Total indebtedness $14 , 535 67 

Total Credit balances $4,8.S3 59 

Total Debit balances 1,060 31 

Net Balance paid ojt 3,826 28 



$18,361 95 $18,331 95 



1920-21 DEPAET.MEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



197 



BY THE ADJUSTMENT BOARD, APRIL-JULY, 1920.— Continued. 



Cr. on 
books 



I 



Total 
Credits 



Indebtedness 



House 

a/c 



Supply 

a/c 



Store 
a/c 



I Jndebt- 
Horse| edness 
or cow since 
a/c I April 30, 
1920 



Charge 
for 

transfer- 
ring to 

other iot 



Total in- 
debtedness 



Net balance 

due to or 

from settler 



$ c. $ c. 



$ c. 



1,000 00 562 78 



$ c. 



$ c. 



6 95 35 31 



$ c. 



$ c 
36 52 



$ c 



$ c. 
641 56 



$ c. 
358 44 Cr. 



322 35 



1,100 00 
1,030 00 
1,000 00 

1,114 48 

1,000 00 

1,250 00 

1,200 00 
18,361 95 



461 61 



115 00 



195 44 

457 29 
421 29 



46 00 



34 52 



524 63 



107 56 



25 00 



504 68 

465 46 
5,263 07 



218 84 

223 05 
2,171 65 



221 11 

106 41 
1.150 07 



379 56 

30 98 

642 10 

500 00 
47 43 

228 98 
165 12 



956 17 143 83Cr. 



250 00 



200 00 



326 98 

1,072 06 

1,614 48 
468 72 



1,168 61 



Ci7.3 02Cr, 

72 OGDr, 

500 OODr. 
531 28Cr. 

81 39Cr. 



960 04 239 96 Cr. 
593 00 4,332 881,025 00 14,535 67 4,886 59Cr. 

Less debit balances 1 , 060 31Dr. 

Net balance paid out 3 , 826 28Cr . 



198 






REPORT 


OF 


THE 






" No>3 




FINANCIAL REPORT 


ON 


SETTLEMENTS 


EFFECTED 


WITH 


THOSE 


LEAVING 



Name and Property. 



Re Buildings 






1 


■tf >s « 




o 


tf2 
•— 


0^0 




c 


a ~, 


<ux: 


aj 


o 

■3 = 


luat'o 

ther 

ngs 


seac 
ncei: 
king 


-a 




=3 cS cj 




■eS-^ 


cs " — 


«+^ 


fl 


> 


> 


III • 


j 



Adjustments Allowed 



O 



P 

S 
a 

o 






Ashcroft, Enoch, Lot 3 

Con. 10. O'Brien 

Baker, William, Lot 19, 

Con. 11, O'Brien . . 
Beamont, Robert, Lot 

17, Con. 13, O'Brien 
Behie, Clarence L., Lot 

4, Con. 16, Owens . . 
Bould, James, Lot 8, 

Con. 9, O'Brien . . . 
Boyce, Thomas C, Lot 

17, Con. 12, O'Brien. 
Brown, Chas. W., Lot 4, 

Con. 10, O'Brien . 
Capper, F. P., Lot 16, 

Con. 12, O'Brien 

Chapman, Benj., Lot 12 

Con. 10, O'Brien 

Clark, John, Lot 24, 

Con. 14, Owens . . 
Clark, Robert, Lot 26, 

Con. 18, Owens . . . 
Clark, Thomas, Lot 24, 

Con. 11, O'Brien . 
Clarke, W. G., Lot 27, 

Cons. 9 & 10, O'Brien 
Convery, Robt. J., Lot 

12, Con. 13, O'Brien 
Darlington, F. G., Lot 

21, Con. 10, O'Brien. 
Davidson, John, Lots 10 

& 10, Cons. 10 & 11, 

O'Brien 

Davis, J. H., Lot 18, 

Con. 13, O'Brien . . . 
Dumont, Francis, Lot 

27, Con. 7, O'Brien.. 
Durand, D. J., Lot 22, 

Con. 11, O'Brien 

Durrant, E. R., Lot 24, 

Con. 9, O'Brien 

Dyson, G. E., Lot 6, 

Con. 8, O'Brien 

Feno, C, Lot 11, Cons. 

10 and 11, O'Brien. . 
Fleming, S., Lot 23, 

Con. 10, O'Brien 

Fox, Albert, Lot 24, 

Con. 14, Owens 

Gardiner, W. J., Lot 23, 

Con. 11, O'Brien 

Gauthier, Wm., Lot 16, 

Con. 1.5, O'Brien . . . 
Gould, A. H. J., Lots 24 

& 25, Con. 17, Owens 
Halliwell, Benj., Lot 

25, Con. 16, Owens. . 



$ c. 

856 00 
774 00 

,008 00 
750 00 
150 00 

.000 00 



550 00 
665 00 
224 00 
163 00 
,250 00 



210 00 

441 00 
,618 00 



457 00 
700 00 



425 00 
979 00 



1.563 00 



598 00 



$ c. 
178 00 
249 00 
468 00 
100 00 



275 00 

1,185 00 

486 00 

295 00 



200 00 



370 00 

177 00 
346 00 



95 00 
380 00 



235 00 



317 00 



85 00 



$ c. 
489 75 
789 00 
482 01 



492 89 



$ c 
250 00 
150 00 
350 00 
700 00 



400 00 



609 17 
224 19 



722 66 



322 27 

402 46 



879 95 
567 62 



352 97 
416 55 



1,038 93 



$ e 
100 00 
200 00 
400 00 

85 00 



$ c 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 



250 00 
150 00 
75 00 
150 00 
250 00 



250 00 
618 00 



250 00 
150 00 



150 00 
300 00 



400 00 



150 00 



300 00 

90 00 

400 00 

200 00 



200 00 



115 00 

125 00 
500 00 



75 00 
275 00 



200 00 



300 00 



50 00 



,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 
,000 00 



$ c 

295 00 

75 00 

50 00 

100 00 



200 00 



000 00 
000 00 

000 00 
000 00 



000 00 
000 00 



000 00 
000 00 
750 00 
000 00 



1,000 00 






345 00 
170 00 



14 00 



160 00 
100 00 



10 00 



100 00 



20 00 



1920 21 



DEFARTMEXT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS'. 



199 



KAPUSKASING COLONY BY ADJUSTING OFFICERS, APRIL-JULY, 1920. 



Adjustments Allowed 



a 5 

o 






tf "3 




Indebtedness 



M 



o « 



Siunmary of Settlement 



i5 



o Sf.S 



^ cd 0^ 

J aft: 



32 00 



30 00 



120 00 
25 00 

64 00 
113 50 



100 00 



16 50 



$ c. 



80 00 



10 00 



50 00 
60 00 



40 00 

20 00 



40 00 



21 00 



40 00 
15 00 



70 00 



10 00 



55 00 



25 00 



50 00 



$ c, 



271 83 



527 93 
300 00 



44 00 



500 00 



500 00 



845 46 

17 50 

107 44 



75 00 



c 
1.645 
1,585 
2,103 
885 
527 
2,250 
1,150 
2,035 
1,584 
1,115 
1.150 
1,515 
500 
1,120 
1.140 



1,664 00 
2,346 50 

500 00 
1,445 00 
1.435 00 

845 46 
1,167 50 
1,817 44 

750 00 
1,791 50 

1,275 00 



•i; c. 

142 54 

199 56 

671 41 

21 00 



648 88 



215 85 
348 83 



42 79 
11 49 



22 20 



224 73 
555 74 



115 78 
74 19 
57 79 

777 70 



152 09 



c c. 
239 60 

88 87 
253 58 

43 77 

27 93 
625 27 



227 97 
296 76 



32 25 



221 30 



163 95 
495 84 



56 50 
271 27 
134 38 
226 68 



90 27 



225 66 



$ c. 



37 50 



145 00 



266 50 



117 25 



$ c. 

382 14 

288 43 

924 99 

64 77 

27 93 

1.311 65 



443 82 
790 59 



42 79 

43 74 



243 50 



388 68 
1,051 58 



172 28 

345 46 

192 17 

1,270 88 



359 61 



225 66 



$ c 

,262 86 

,297 07 

,178 84 

820 23 

500 00 

938 35 

,150 00 

,591 18 

793 41 

.115 00 

,107 21 

,471 26 

500 00 

876 50 

,140 00 



1,275 32 

1,294 92 

500 00 

1,445 00 

1,262 72 

500 00 

975 33 

546 56 

750 (M) 

1,431 89 

1,049 34 



$ c 
31 45 
30 00 
43 31 



27 59 
69 01 



30 00 
60 68 



48 00 



24 67 
50 00 



26 06 



50 00 



$ c. 
,231 41 
,267 07 
,135 53 
820 23 

472 41 
869 34 

,150 00 
,561 18 
732 73 
,115 00 
,107 21 
,471 26 
500 00 
828 50 
,140 00 

1,250 65 
1,244 92 
500 00 
1,445 00 
1,262 72 

473 94 
975 33 
546 56 
750 00 

1,381 89 

1,049 34 



200 



EEPOKT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



FINANCIAL REPORT ON SETTLEMENTS EFFECTED WITH THOSE LEAVING 





Ee Buildings 


Adjustments Allowed 


Ncme and Property. 


o 
o 

> 


Valuation on 
other build- 
ings 


House accouat 
cancelled by 
taking house 


o 

o 


On other 
buildings 


o 

o 


a 

o 


O 


Harriott, David, Lots 14 

& 15, Con. 11, O'Brien 
Harrow, G. W., Lot 18, 

Con. 12, O'Brien . . . 
Plibbard, Thos., Lot 24, 

Con. 10, O'Brien . . . 
Hirst, Wm., Lot 6, Con. 

10, O'Brien 


$ c. 
764 00 
754 00 
610 00 
850 CO 


$ c. 
305 00 
385 CO 
414 CO 
620 00 


$ c. 
651 37 
377 19 
437 17 
780 67 


$ c. 
200 00 
250 00 
150 00 
250 00 


$ c. 
300 00 
150 00 
350 00 
400 00 


$ c. 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 


$ c. 

450 00 
50 00 
75 00 

225 00 


$ c. 
47 25 


Hudson, I. F., Lot 2, 

Con. 16, Owens 

Ilott, Harry, Lot 1, 


610 CO 


155 00 


575 11 


150 00 


50 00 


1,000 00 


120 00 





Ilott, Jos., Lot 1, Con. 


















Innes, John, Lot 5, 

Con. 10, O'Brien 

Joyce, Norris. Lot 24, 

Con. 18, Owens 

Kelly, J. J., Lot 19, 

Con. 14, O'Brien 

Kelly, J. W., Lot 26, 

Con. 9, O'Brien 

Kirkham, W. J., Lot 20, 

Con. 15, O'Brien 

T pwi«! T T 


475 CO 
945 00 
400 DC 
'825 00 
1,080 00 


313 00 
100 CO 
277 00 
187 00 


495 18 

808 10 
299 21 












350 00 
150 00 
250 00 
850 00 


250 00 
100 CO 
200 00 
150 00 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 




80 00 


45 00 
70 00 




Lowe, D. A.. Lot 25, 
Con. 18, Owens 

Makowsky, H. E., Lot 
16, Con. 11, O'Brien. 

Maltby, R., Lot 22, Con. 
9 O'Brien 


840 OC 
290 OC 
994 00 
540 00 
729 00 
li067 00 


90 00 




250 00 


100 00 


1,000 00 










425 00 
97 00 

,120 00 


670 00 

542 31 
659 24 


250 00 
150 00 


350 00 
350 00 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 






Meaden, W. F., Lot 25, 

Con. 15, Owens 

Moffat, W. G., Lot 19, 

Con. 15, O'Brien 

Morgan, A. S., Lot ^20> 

Con. 11, O'Brien .'. . 
Musklow, W. F., Lot 5, 

Cnn 11 D'RrlpTi 










250 00 


150 00 


1,000 00 










Magrath, Thos., Lot 13, 
Con. 16, O'Brien 

McKinnon, I. C, Lot 15. 
Con. 12, O'Brien . . . 

McKinnon, W. N., Lot 
15 Con 13 O'Brien 


850 00 
1,152 00 

288 00 


165 00 
116 00 
100 00 


518 25 
556 83 
556 78 


250 00 
250 00 
150 00 


150 00 

75 00 

100 00 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1.000 00 


50 00 








Nichols, D. C, Lot 21 
Con 11, O'Brien 






Nichols, D. S., Lot 20, 
Con 10 O'Brien 


625 00 


334 00 


473 07 


300 00 


250 00 


1,000 00 






Nichols, G. H., Lot 20, 
Con. 9, O'Brien 






Nypack, Herman, Lots 
28 & 29, Con. 18, 
Owens 


















Otto, C. A., Lots 7 & 8, 
Con. 10, O'Brien 


845 00 


945 00 


668 27 


150 GO 


700 00 


1,000 00 


250 00 





1920 21 



DEPAETMEXT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



201 



KAPUSKASING COLONY BY ADJUSTING OFFICERS, APRIL-JULY, 1920.— Con. 



Adjustments Allowed 


Indebtedness 


Summary of Settlement 




On ploughing 
done 


On seeding 
done 


S 3 
O 


-3 
o 

Eh 


a 

^§ 
p. o 


3 

o 
o 
o 

p 

o 
+-> 

02 


3 

CO l> 
u o 
o o 


Total indebt- 
edness 


Net balance 
due settler 


Less advance 
made through 
Rev. H.J. King 


3 

o 
O 


$ c. 
79 00 


$ (•. 
110 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,139 00 
1,465 00 
1,778 09 
1,927 25 


$ C. 

520 61 
144 52 
292 23 
684 93 


$ C. 

520 68 
253 63 
584 90 
334 61 


$ C. 

25 00 
22 50 


$ c. 

1.041 29 
423 15 
877 13 

1.042 04 


$ c. 

1,097 71 

1.041 85 

900 96 

885 21 


$ c. 
50 00 
30 00 

49 51 

50 00 


$ c. 
1,047 71 
1 Oil 85 


15 00 










16 00 
5 00 


187 00 


851 45 






835 21 
















1,320 00 
529 89 

300 OG 


190 97 


180 31 
29 89 




371 28 
29 89 


948 72 
500 00 
300 00 




948 72 








529 89 
300 00 


500 00 

300 00 






























210 00 


1,8D0 00 
1,250 00 
1,887 84 
1.570 00 


204 09 

3 18 

335 36 


250 45 

5 57 

485 32 


25 00 


454 54 

8 75 

845 68 


1,435 46 
1,241 25 
1.042 16 
1 570 00 


53 24 


1 435 46 








1 241 25 




33 00 




362 84 


988 j2 
1 ,570 00 


























22 00 


75 00 
554 26 


1,447 00 

551 26 

1,690 00 

1,500 00 


15 22 


151 76 
39 04 


1 


151 76 
54 26 


1,295 24 

•500 00 

1,600 00 

1,500 00 


14 90 


1 295 24 






485 10 










r.eoj 00 


















1 500 00 
























40 0(J 






1,440 00 

200 00 

1,490 00 

1,325 00 


87 97 


186 07 




274 04 


1.165 96 

200 00 

1,146 06 

1,213 80 

1,246 45 

500 00 

1.351 85 

500 00 

150 00 
299 32 


39 00 
30 00 

36 79 


1,126 98 






200 oa 


200 00 




40 OO 






96 24 
3 55 


247 70 
111 20 




343 94 

111 2(J 

3 55 


1,116 06 










1.213 80 
1,246 45 










1,250 00 

500 00 
1,580 00 








500 00 






500 OQ^ 
1 351 85 




30 Oi 




93-26 


109 89 


25 00 


• 228 15 

1 






500 00 
15 J 00 


500 00 
2,100 00 


500 00 
















150 00 








982 63 


578 05 


240 00 


1,8'JO 68 


262 53 













14 L.F. 



202 



EEPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



FINANCIAL REPORT ON SETTLEMENTS EFFECTED WITH THOSE LEAVING 





Ke Buildings 


Adjustments Allowed 






1 


-*^ >3 « 












§ 


fl2 

o " 


gf ^^ 






U3 


a 


"2 « 








ol5 2 










eg o 


Name and Property. 


_ 


g-5 




<a 






>Hti 


S « 




ii 


luati 
ther 
tigs 


use a 
ance 
akinj 


3 
^ 


Ii 




0) V 


^1 




oj-P 


oj o.-, 


O w +a 


CJ 


a-^ 


c-3 


fl « 


a " 




> 


> 


w 


O 


O 


o 


o 


O 




$ c. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Precious, D., Lot 7, 


















Con. 9, O'Brien 


810 00 


664 00 


668 49 


250 00 


400 00 


1,000 00 




25 00 


Precious, W. W., Lot 7, 


















Con. 8, O'Brien 


















Preston, Robt., Lots 23 


















& 24, Con. 17, Owens 


887 00 


30 00 




150 00 


100 00 


1,000 00 






Pryce, Jas., Lot 6, Con. 






11, O'Brien 


780 00 


200 00 


714 44 


150 00 


200 00 


1,000 00 


85 00 


54 75 


Raynsford, John, Lot 


















26, Con. 8, O'Brien. . 


560 00 


60 00 


388 90 


150 00 


50 00 


1,000 00 






Reid, W. C, Lot 22, 






Con. 10, O'Brien . . . 


658 00 


380 00 


528 52 


150 00 


250 00 


1,000 00 






Roberts, Jos., Lot 25, 






Con. 15, Owens .... 


150 00 










1,000 00 






Robinson, D. L., Lot 14, 














Con 13, O'Brien .... 








75 00 




1,000 00 


75 00 




Rodger, Robt., Lot 19, 










Con. 13, O'Brien 


1,300 00 


300 00 


480 87 


400 00 


300 00 


1,000 00 


90 00 




Salava, J. 0., Lot 29, 


















Con. 1 Williamson. . 


















Scarborough, E. T., Lot 


















24, Con. 16, Owens. . 


366 00 


345 00 














Scarborough, R., Lot 27, 














Cons. 10 fell, O'Brien 


900 00 


150 00 


637 70 


250 00 


75 00 


1,000 00 


60 00 




Selley, W. H., Lot 19, 


















Con. 10, O'Brien 


864 00 


72 00 


897 24 


150 00 


72 00 


1,000 00 


120 00 


•••••. 


Smith, Fred, Lot 18, 


















Con. 10, O'Brien . . . 


772 00 


300 00 


718 56 


150 00 


100 00 


1,000 00 


100 00 




Smith, W. R., Lots 10 & 


















11, Con. 10, O'Brien. 


946 00 


210 00 


482 18 


300 00 


180 00 


1,000 00 


50 00 




Souch, Wm., Lot 28; 


















Con. IS, O'Brien 


730 00 




344 29 


150 00 


75 00 


1,000 00 






Stacey, John, Lot 17, 






Con. 10, O'Brien 


















Taylor, Ernest, Lot 12, 


















Con. 11, O'Brien 


750 00 


75 00 


618 47 


150 00 


75 00 


1,000 00 


30 00 




Thornton, I. B., Lots 25 


















& 26, Con. 10, O'Brien 


900 00 


70 00 


582 85 


250 00 


50 00 


1,000 00 


100 00 




Vice, J. H., Lot 22, 


















Con. 8, O'Brien 


600 00 


95 00 


423 34 


150 00 


75 00 


1,000 00 






Waterhouse, C. C, Lot 






14, Con. 12, O'Brien. 


1,652 00 


180 00 


563 08 


200 00 


450 00 


1,000 00 


332 00 




Whelan, W. G., Lot 25, 


















Con, 1, Williamson.. 


756 00 


105 00 




250 00 


100 00 


1,000 00 






Wilkinson, R. W.. Lot 






17, Con. 11, O'Brien. 


















Wilkinson, Wm., Lot 18, 


















Con. 11, O'Brien ... 


825 00 


270 00 


550 00 


150 00 


145 00 


1,000 00 


45 00 


130 00 


Wilson, C. H., Lot 9, 


















Cons. 10 & 11, O'Brien 


620 00 


843 00 


569 20 


150 00 


600 00 


1,000 00 


360 00 




Titus, Mrs. Violet, Lot 


















13, Con. 11, O'Brien. 


832 00 


770 00 




150 00 


200 00 


1,000 00 


62 00 




Totals 


47,572 00 


15,708 00 


25,526 80 


12,8b'8 00 


11,287 00 


59,750 00 


4,483 00 


407 50 







192021 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FOEESTS. 



203 



KAPUSKASING COLONY BY ADJUSTING OFFICERS, APRIL-JULY, 1920.— Concluded. 





Adjustnjents Allowed 




Indebtedness 


Summary of Settlement 


O 

o 
o 
•s 


On ploughing 
done 


be 

*> a) 

o 


o 


o 

o tn 




S 

o 
o 


ji > 

t-i o 
o o 


.S CO 

o aj 
H 


Net balance 
due settler 


Less advance 
made through 
Rev.H.J.King 


-»3 

o 
O 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,675 00 

200 00 
1,375 00 
1,499 75 
1,212 00 
1,446 00 
1,000 00 
1,150 00 
2,003 34 

200 00 

540 21 
1,450 16 
1,442 00 
1,350 00 
1,596 00 
1,320 00 

300 00 
1,330 00 


$ c. 
193 29 


.$ c. 
161 32 


$ c. 
25 00 


$ c. 
, 379 61 


$ c. 
1,295 39 

200 00 
1,156 75 

884 46 
1,212 00 

834 76 
1,000 00 
1,085 34 
1,384 26 

200 00 

500 00 
1,203 38 
1,020 79 

920 68 
1,290 42 
1.320 00 


$ c. 

30 00 

31 44 
25 00 

45 25 

50 00 
35 00 
43 91 

30 00 

75 00 
39 18 


$ c. 
1,265 39 








200 00 
125 00 


200 00 








145 89 
232 23 


72 36 
383 06 




218 25 
615 29 


1,125 31 




10 00 




859 46 


12 00 






1,212 00 


12 00 


20 00 


14 00 




264 48 


346 76 




611 24 


834 76 
1,000 00 










18 51 
247 05 


46 15 
372 03 




64 66 
619 08 


1,085 34 








213 34 

200 00 

540 21 

37 66 


1,339 01 








200 00 








1,37 52 
126 59 
151 30 
206 22 


40 21 
109 26 
294 62 
278 02 

99 36 




40 21 
246 78 
421 21 
429 32 
305 58 


500 00 


27 50 






1,203 38 




100 00 




970 79 








885 68 


10 00 


70 00 


56 00 
25 00 


300 00 


1,246 51 
1,320 00 












300 00 
1,173 07 
1,269 38 
1,078 75 
1,005 88 
1,364 41 

200 00 
1,222 03 
1.817 85 
1,472 00 


300 00 




75 00 




44 07 
130 62 

32 66 

424 17 

3 31 


112 86 




156 93 
130 62 
225 75 
1,075 79 
219 59 


1,143 07 








1,400 00 
1.304 50 
2.081 67 
1,584 00 
200 00 
1,583 79 
2,120 00 
1,472 00 


1,269 38 


18 00 






61 50 

59 67 

234 00 

200 00 

83 79 


193 09 
651 62 
216 28 


;: 


1,078 75 




40 00 




930 88 
1,325 23 








200 00 


30 00 






226 82 
277 15 


134 94 


25 00 


361 76 
302 15 


1,222 03 


10 00 







1.817 85 




60 00 






1.472 00 


















754 50 


1,005 00 


304 00 


9,013 41 


99,872 41 


10.799 21 


11. .302 86 


J53 75 


23,055 82 


76,816 59 


1,248 99 


75.567 60 



204 REPOET OF THE No. 3 



Nummary. 

L Valuation on Houses . . . $47,572^ OQ 

Amount of house accounts cancelled $25,526 80 

Amount allowed settlers ,.. 12,868 00 

Excess of valuation over house accounts and amounts 

allowed 9,177 20 



$47,572 00 $47,572 00 

Valuation of Barns and Outbuildings $15,708 00 

Amount allowed settlers on these $11,287 00 

Excess of valuation over amount -allowed 4,421 00 



$15,708 00 $15,708 00 

3. Total Amount Allowed Settlers $99,872 41 

Total indebtedness cancelled , $23,055 82 

Net balance due settlers 76,816 59 



$99,872 41 $99,872 41 

4. Net balance due settlers $76,816 59 

Amount paid settlers through Rev. H. J. King $1,248 99 

Cash paid out .• 75,5'67 60 



$76,816 59 $76,816 59 
Respectfully submitted on behalf of the Adjusting Officers, 

J. A. GUNX, 

' Chairman. 

ALBERT H. ABBOTT, 

Secretary. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE IN ADJUSTING CLAIMS OF SOLDIER SETTLERS 

AT KAPUSKASING COLONY. 

Effected by the Adjustixg Officers, under the Chairmanbhip of 
1 Brigadier-General J. A. Gunn. 

Amounts awarded to settlers leaving the Colony $76,816 59 

Amounts awaj-ded to settlers remaining at the Colony 4,886 59 

• $81,703 18 

Freight on household goods of settlers leaving the Colony... $1,282 26 
Railway fares of settlers leaving the Colony 6,239 46 

7.521 72 

Seeds provided for settlers remaining at the Colony, 1,551 30 

Expenses of adjusting officers and incidental expenses 973 93 



Total expenditure- .................. $91,750 13 

ARTHUR E. D. BRUCE, 

Secretary and Accountant. 



1920-21 DEPAliTMEXT OF LA^sDS AND FOEESTS. 205 

Appendix No. 47. 
Settlers' Loan Commissioner. 

Toronto, December loth, 1920. 
To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to herewith submit a report of the operations conducted by this 
Department under the Northern and North-western Ontario Development Act, 
Amending Acts 1916 and 1918. 

Up to October 31st, 1920, a total of 2,227 applications for loans were received, 
asking for an amount of $874,760.00, an average of $384.61 per application. 
Careful consideration was given to each individual request, and loans advanced- 
on the basis of security offered in the way of improved land, where it was clearly 
sliown the money could be used to good advantage for the improvement of settle- 
ment duties. 

A total of 1,556 loans have been made to settlers, amounting to $490,836.00, 
an average of $315.44, and in addition a loan of $12,000.00 has been advanced 
to the Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd., and also a loan of $8,000.00 
to the Kenora Dairy Co-operative Association. 

The repayment of loans has been very satisfactory, as is evidenced by the 
fact that over 90 per cent, of the interest payments are up-to-date, and payments 
of principal equal over 97 per cent.' of the amount due, this being partly duo 
to the fact that a number of loans have been paid in advance. 

I beg to direct your attention to the attached memorandum giving details oi 
operation carried on, and it is a pleasure to be able to state that settlers who 
have received loans through this Department have expressed their appreciation 
of the help the loan has been, by enabling them to stay on their own lots, and 
carry on the work of clearing land. 

Yours very truly, 

F. Dane, 
Settlers' Loan Commissioner.- 



206 



REPOKT OF THE 



No. 3 



Memorandum of Settlers' Loans to October 31st, 1920. 
Applications. 

Total number of applications received 2,227 

Total amount applied for $874,760 00 

Average per application 384 61 

Amount applied for under approved applications 636,040 00 

Loans. 

Number of loans issued 1.558 

Equal to 70% of applications. 
Amount granted 510,536 00 

Equal to 58% of total amount applied for, and 

Equal to 80% of total amount applied for under 
approved applications. 

Average loan 315 44 

Total acreage covered by liens 238,678 

Acreage improved land — equal to 13.2% of total acreage 32,663 

Average loan per acre on total acreage 2 14 

Average loan per acre on acreage improved land 15 63 

Note. — Figures, except averages, include application for, and loan of $12,000.00 
to Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd., and $8,000.00